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 Ghiandaia azzurra americana (Cyanocitta cristata) - Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)

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Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Ghiandaia azzurra americana (Cyanocitta cristata) - Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)   Ven 9 Dic 2011 - 17:45

Nella seconda parte di questa scheda scopriremo che la ghiandaia azzurra americana viene simbolicamente associata alla comunicazione, alla curiosità e all'energia. Ci insegnerà a proteggere le persone che amiamo, insegnerà ad usare in modo corretto il nostro potere personale.

Ma intanto gli articoli di wikipedia, buona lettura.

FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cyanocitta_cristata

Cyanocitta cristata
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.


FONTE IMMAGINE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Cyanocitta-cristata-004.jpg

La Ghiandaia azzurra americana (Cyanocitta cristata, Linneo, 1758) è un uccello dell'America settentrionale della famiglia dei corvidi.

Bibliografia

BirdLife International 2004. Cyanocitta cristata. In: IUCN 2010. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Versione 2010.1

Curiosità

L'uccello è il simbolo ufficiale dei Toronto Blue Jays, squadra di baseball canadese militante nel massimo campionato statunitense di baseball, la Major League Baseball.




FONTE IMMAGINE: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cyanocitta_cristata_FWS.jpg


FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Jay

The Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) is a passerine bird in the family Corvidae, native to North America. It is resident through most of eastern and central United States and southern Canada, although western populations may be migratory. It breeds in both deciduous and coniferous forests, and is common near and in residential areas. It is predominately blue with a white breast and underparts, and a blue crest. It has a black, U-shaped collar around its neck and a black border behind the crest. Sexes are similar in size and plumage, and plumage does not vary throughout the year. Four subspecies of the Blue Jay are recognized.

The Blue Jay mainly feeds on nuts and seeds such as acorns, soft fruits, arthropods, and occasionally small vertebrates. It typically gleans food from trees, shrubs, and the ground, though it sometimes hawks insects from the air. It builds an open cup nest in the branches of a tree, which both sexes participate in constructing. The clutch can contain two to seven eggs, which are blueish or light brown with brown spots. Young are altricial, and are brooded by the female for 8–12 days after hatching. They may remain with their parents for one to two months before leaving the nest.

The bird's name derives from its noisy, garrulous nature,[1] and it sometimes also called a "jaybird".[2]

Description

The Blue Jay measures 22–30 cm (9–12 in) from bill to tail and weighs 70–100 g (2.5–3.5 oz), with a wingspan of 34–43 cm (13–17 in).[3] There is a pronounced crest on the head, a crown of feathers, which may be raised or lowered according to the bird's mood. When excited or aggressive, the crest may be fully raised. When frightened, the crest bristles outwards, brushlike. When the bird is feeding among other jays or resting, the crest is flattened to the head.[4]

Its plumage is lavender-blue to mid-blue in the crest, back, wings, and tail, and its face is white. The underside is off-white and the neck is collared with black which extends to the sides of the head. The wing primaries and tail are strongly barred with black, sky-blue and white. The bill, legs, and eyes are all black. Males and females are nearly identical.[5]

As with other blue-hued birds, the Blue Jay's coloration is not derived from pigments but is the result of light interference due to the internal structure of the feathers;[citation needed] if a blue feather is crushed, the blue disappears as the structure is destroyed.[6] This is referred to as structural coloration.

Blue Jays have strong black bills used for cracking nuts and acorns, and for eating corn, grains and seeds, although they also eat insects such as beetles, grasshoppers, and caterpillars.

Distribution and habitat

The Blue Jay occurs from southern Canada through the eastern and central USA south to Florida and northeastern Texas. The western edge of the range stops where the arid pine forest and scrub habitat of the closely related Steller's jay (C. stelleri) begins. Recently, the range of the Blue Jay has extended northwestwards so that it is now a rare but regularly seen winter visitor along the northern US and southern Canadian Pacific Coast,[7] As the two species' ranges now overlap, C. cristata may sometimes hybridize with Steller's jay.[8]

The northernmost subspecies C. c. bromia is migratory, subject to necessity. It may withdraw several hundred kilometers south in the northernmost parts of its range, but even northern birds do not necessarily move south, particularly in mild years with plentiful winter food. It migrates during the daytime, in loose flocks of 5 to 250 birds.

The Blue Jay occupies a variety of habitats within its large range, from the pine woods of Florida to the spruce-fir forests of northern Ontario. It is less abundant in denser forests, preferring mixed woodlands with oaks and beeches.[4] It has expertly adapted to human activity, occurring in parks and residential areas, and can adapt to wholesale deforestation with relative ease if human activity creates other means for the jays to get by.[9]

Subspecies

Four subspecies are generally accepted, though the variation within this species is rather subtle and essentially clinal. No firm boundaries can be drawn between the inland subspecies. The ranges of the coastal races are better delimited.[10]

Cyanocitta cristata bromia – northern Blue Jay

Canada and northern USA. The largest subspecies, with fairly dull plumage. Blue is rather pale.

Cyanocitta cristata cristata – coastal Blue Jay

Coastal USA from North Carolina to Texas, except southern Florida. Mid-sized and vivid blue.

Cyanocitta cristata cyanotephra – interior Blue Jay

Inland USA, intergrading with C. c. bromia to the north. Mid-sized, quite dark blue on mantle contrasting cleanly with very white underside.

Cyanocitta cristata semplei – Florida Blue Jay

Southern Florida. The smallest subspecies, much like C. c. bromia in color.


FONTE IMMAGINE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Blue_Jay-27527.jpg


Behavior

The Blue Jay is a moderately slow flier (roughly 32–40 km/h (20-25 mi/h)) when unprovoked)[11] and therefore, easy prey for hawks and owls when flying in open areas. It flies with body and tail held level, with slow wing beats.

The Blue Jay can be beneficial to other bird species, as it may chase predatory birds, such as hawks and owls, and will scream if it sees a predator within its territory. It has also been known to sound an alarm call when hawks or other dangers are near, and smaller birds often recognize this call and hide themselves away accordingly. It may also be aggressive towards humans who come close to its nest, and if an owl roosts near the nest during the daytime the Blue Jay mobs it until it takes a new roost. However, Blue Jays have also been known to attack or kill other smaller birds.[12] Jays are very territorial birds, and they will chase others from a feeder for an easier meal. Additionally, the Blue Jay has a bad reputation for raiding other birds' nests, stealing eggs, chicks, and nests. However, this may not be as widespread as is typically thought.[13]

Blue Jays, like other corvids, are highly curious and are considered intelligent birds. Young individuals playfully snatch brightly colored or reflective objects, such as bottle caps or pieces of aluminium foil, and carry them around until they lose interest.[12] Blue jays in captivity have been observed using strips of newspaper as tools to obtain food,[14] while captive fledglings have been observed attempting to open the door to their cages [15]

Diet

Its food is sought both on the ground and in trees and includes virtually all known types of plant and animal sources, such as acorns and beech mast, weed seeds, grain, fruits and other berries, peanuts, bread, meat, small invertebrates of many types, scraps in town parks, bird-table food and rarely eggs and nestlings.[13] Blue Jays will sometimes cache food, though to what extent differs widely among individuals.[verification needed]


Reproduction

The mating season begins in mid-March, peaks in mid-April to May, and extends into July. Any suitable tree or large bush may be used for nesting, though an evergreen is preferred. The nest is preferentially built at a height of 3 to 10 m. It is cup-shaped and composed of twigs, small roots, bark strips, moss, other plant material, cloth, paper, and feathers, with occasional mud added to the cup.

Blue Jays are not very picky about nesting locations. If no better place is available - e.g. in a heavily deforested area - they will even use places like the large mailboxes typical of the rural United States.[9] They also appropriate nests of other mid-sized songbirds as long as these are placed in suitable spots; American robin nests are commonly used by Blue Jays, for example.

Blue Jays typically form monogamous pair bonds for life. Both sexes build the nest and rear the young, though only the female broods them. The male feeds the female while she is brooding the eggs. There are usually 4–5 eggs laid and incubated over 16–18 days. The young fledge usually between 17–21 days after hatching.[12]

After the juveniles fledge, the family travels and forages together until early fall, when the young birds disperse to avoid competition for food during the winter.

Vocalizations

Blue Jays can make a large variety of sounds, and individuals may vary perceptibly in their calling style. Like other corvids, they may learn to mimic human speech. Blue Jays can also copy the cries of local hawks so well that it is sometimes difficult to tell which it is.[16] Their voice is typical of most jays in being varied, but the most commonly recognized sound is the alarm call, which is a loud, almost gull-like scream. There is also a high-pitched jayer-jayer call that increases in speed as the bird becomes more agitated.This particular call can be easily confused with the chickadee's song because of the slow starting chick-ah-dee-ee. Blue Jays will use these calls to band together to mob potential predators such as hawks and drive them away from the jays' nests.

Blue Jays also have quiet, almost subliminal calls which they use among themselves in proximity. One of the most distinctive calls of this type is often referred to as the "rusty pump" owing to its squeaky resemblance to the sound of an old hand-operated water pump. The Blue Jay (and other corvids) are distinct from all other songbirds for using their call as a birdsong.


Relationship with humans

The Blue Jay is the provincial bird of Prince Edward Island.

Toronto's Major League Baseball team is called the Toronto Blue Jays. The Blue Jay is also the athletic mascot of The Johns Hopkins University, Elizabethtown College, Jesuit High School, Bryn Mawr Elementary School, and Creighton University although the latter spells the name as Bluejay.

In old African-American folklore of the southern United States the Blue Jay was held to be a servant of the Devil, and "was not encountered on a Friday as he was fetching sticks down to Hell; furthermore, he was so happy and chirpy on a Saturday as he was relieved to return from Hell".[17]

References

^ Coues, Elliot (1890). Key to North American birds (5 ed.). Boston, MA: Estes and Lauriat. pp. 326. OCLC 469020022.
^ ">jaybird "jaybird - definition of jaybird by the Free Online Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia". Retrieved April 20, 2011.
^ CLO (1999), Frysinger (2001)
^ a b Nero (1991)
^ Madge & Burn (1994), Frysinger (2001)
^ All About Birds, Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology (2007)
^ CLO (1999)
^ Rhymer & Simberloff (1996)
^ a b Henninger (1906)
^ Madge & Burn (1994)
^ Texas Parks & Wildlife retrieved July 1, 2008
^ a b c Oiseaux.net
^ a b Cornell bird guide
^ Jones & Kamil (1973)
^ American Rivers blog
^ George (2003), p. 279.
^ Ingersoll, Ernest (1923). Birds in legend, fable and folklore. New York: Longmans, Green and co.. pp. 166–167. Retrieved 2009-08-08.

BirdLife International (2004). Cyanocitta cristata. 2006. IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN 2006. www.iucnredlist.org. Retrieved on 09 May 2006.
Cornell Lab of Ornithology (CLO) (1999): Bird Guide - Blue Jay. Retrieved 2007-MAY-29.
Frysinger, J. (2001): Animal Diversity Web: Cyanocitta cristata. Retrieved 2007-JUN-18.
George, Philip Brandt. (2003): In: Baughman, Mel M. (ed.): Reference Atlas to the Birds of North America. National Geographic Society, Washington, D.C. ISBN 0-7922-3373-5
Goodwin, Derek & Gillmor, Robert (1976): Crows of the World (1st ed.). University of Washington Press, Seattle.
Henninger, W.F. (1906): A preliminary list of the birds of Seneca County, Ohio. Wilson Bull. 18(2): 47-60. DjVu fulltext PDF fulltext
Jones, Thony B. & Kamil, Alan C. (1973): Tool-Making and Tool-Using in the Northern Blue Jay. Science 180(4090): 1076–1078. doi:10.1126/science.180.4090.1076 (HTML abstract)
Madge, Steve & Burn, Hilary (1994): Crows and jays: a guide to the crows, jays and magpies of the world. A&C Black, London. ISBN 0-7136-3999-7
Nero, Robert W. (1991): Bird Fact Sheet - Blue Jay. Retrieved 2007-MAY-29.
Oiseaux.net (2008): Blue Jay. Version of 2008-FEB-13. Retrieved 2008-FEB-14.
Rhymer, Judith M. & Simberloff, Daniel (1996): Extinction by hybridization and introgression. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Syst. 27: 83–109. doi:10.1146/annurev.ecolsys.27.1.83 (HTML abstract)
Tarvin, K.A. & Woolfenden, G.E. (1999): Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata). In: Poole, A. & Gill, F. (eds.): The Birds of North America 469. Academy of Natural Sciences, Philadelphia, PA & American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, D.C. Online version. doi:bna.469 (requires subscription)


FONTE IMMAGINE: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Blue_Jay-27527-2.jpg
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Tila
Iniziato Sciamano
Iniziato Sciamano


Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Ghiandaia azzurra americana (Cyanocitta cristata) - Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)   Sab 10 Dic 2011 - 15:15

Come per i corvi o le gazze tutto ciò che luccica cattura l'attenzione della ghiandaia azzurra, ed è forse per questo che tra i suoi simbolismi troviamo la curiosità.

Chi ha come totem questo animale troverà nuove direzioni, nuove visioni per placare la sua curiosità.

Ci insegnerà il coraggio di difendere il partner e coloro che amiamo, anche se i nostri avversari sembreranno più potenti di noi.

Scopriremo inoltre che è determinato, vivace, ha grinta, è intelligente; questi sono alcuni dei tratti e dei simbolismi associati alla ghiandaia azzurra che vedremo nei seguenti articoli...buona lettura!


FONTE: http://www.whats-your-sign.com/blue-jay-animal-symbolism.html

Blue Jay Animal Symbolism

Like the crow, magpie and raven, blue jays are talkative creatures utilizing a wide range of vocalizations to express their opinions. Indeed, their speech abilities are so advanced, that they are able to mimic other birds and even humans. Blue jay’s have been known to mimic hawk calls as a ploy to lure these birds of prey away from jay’s nests.

Likewise, those with the blue jay as their totem are quite loquaciousness, and have the gift of gab. Common vocations of those with the blue jay as their totem are sales people, lawyers, politicians, public speakers, and teachers.

Animal symbolism of the blue jay includes:

Loquaciousness
Communication
Determination
Assertiveness
Faithfulness
Intelligence
Advantage
Curiosity
Vibrancy
Clarity
Energy

Animal symbolism of determination, assertiveness, and intelligence is also a shared trait among those who claim the blue jay as their totem (and also common attributes with those having the vocations above listed). We see these characteristics in the blue jay because it is fiercely bold against its enemies.

The jay is fearless when it comes to protecting its partner, young and territory. So too are those with this animal as their totem. They will defend their positions against adversaries who seem much more powerful than themselves – often with successful results.

Blue jay animal symbolism resonates truth, faithfulness, and solidarity because they are vigilant in their tasks. They also keep the same mate for life, which is symbolic of endurance, patience and loyalty. The jay is an excellent symbol for those wishing to honor their long-lasting bond between friends, family and lovers.

In the spiritual realm, the blue jay speaks of clarity and vision. In Native American symbolism (namely the Sioux Nation) the azure of the jay against the blue sky indicated a “double vision” or double clarity. This visual/spiritual “blue on blue” concept speaks of purity of the soul, truth of the heart, and clarity of thought.

In dreams the blue jay animal symbolism also deals with clarity – but of higher thoughts, and taking action. When we dream of blue jays our deeper selves may be telling us that we are not being honest with ourselves about something, and it’s time to “come clean” with our thoughts. Blue jay’s in dreams are also symbolic of taking action in the direction of our highest truth. The jay asks for honesty, and forthrightness – any other action taken (such as deceptive or dishonest action) will mean double jeopardy for us in our waking hours.

These spiritual and dream impressions are especially poignant because the jay is an air animal totem. Creatures of the air naturally symbolize the realm of thought, higher ideals, spirituality and the attainment of higher truth.

The Sioux also observed the jay preferring fir and oak trees for their homes and nesting areas. These trees are symbolic of longevity, endurance and strength, and so share the same animal symbolism with the blue jay.

This is not to say the jay is persnickety. On the contrary, the blue jay animal symbolism includes aspects of opportunity and advantage because it will make its home anywhere. From supermarket awnings, to mailboxes, the blue jay is extremely resourceful and makes the best out of its environment. Those with the jay as their totem are likely to be the same way. Generally easy-going, jay people are able to make a turn situations around to their best advantage, and make awesome lemon aid out of the sourest of lemons.

Blue jay’s are vastly curious, stopping to peck at any shiny thing that catches their eye (much like crows and magpies). Those who resonate with the blue jay will also find themselves equally curious. Indeed, blue jay people have are always dabbling in new directions, gathering new insight, and slaking their curiosities. These people tend to be a jack-of-all trades, knowing a little bit about seemingly everything. This makes them fantastic trouble-shooters and quite resourceful (not to mention fascinating party guests).



FONTE: http://www.linsdomain.com/totems/pages/bluejay.htm

Blue Jay

Proper Use of Power


If you have a Blue Jay totem, you must learn to use your personal power properly. Be careful not to become a bully. The word “jay” comes from the Latin word “Gaea” which is Mother Earth. A Blue Jay totem links you directly with the power of the Earth itself. It can link the heavens and the Earth and give you access to universal energies and power.

If Blue Jay is your totem, you may have tremendous abilities and potential, but you must learn not to be scattered and neglect to develop your abilities to their fullest. Blue Jay people can become dabblers – a little bit of knowledge about many things but master of none. Develop your gifts and you will have unlimited potential.

All images are public domain.

Some of the information on this webpage was derived from the following sources:
Sans, Jamie & Carson, David. Medicine Cards: the Discovery of Power Through the Way of Animals. Santa Fe, NM. 1988. Print.
Andrews, Ted. Animal-speak: the Spiritual & Magical Powers of Creatures Great & Small. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1993. Print.
Andrews, Ted. Animal-Wise: the Spirit Language and Signs of Nature. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1999. Print.
D. J. Conway. Animal Magick: the Art of Recognizing & Working with Familiars. Woodbury, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 2003. Print.
Farmer, Steven D. Animal Spirit Guides. Hayhouse Inc., 2006. Print.

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