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 Reiki History and Reiki Myth

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MessaggioOggetto: Reiki: more concerning the symbols   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:53

FONTE: http://www.aetw.org

and

http://www.scribd.com/doc/168801/Reiki-More-concerning-the-Symbols


Reiki
- more concerning the symbols
by
James Deacon

[Version 1.07]
Copyright © 2008/9 James Deacon


NOT FOR SALE

Copies of this E-Book may be distributed
WITHOUT CHARGE to anyone you wish.
It may also be distributed WITHOUT CHARGE in printed form
- providing it is done so in its entirety (including end-pages).
Permission is NOT given to add to, subtract from,
or otherwise modify this document in any way, shape or form.
[See foot of document for further details re: Use of Materials from this E-book]
THANK YOU

THE REIKI SYMBOL THAT (SUPPOSEDLY) NEVER WAS...

[Copyright © 2005 James Deacon]
Only Three Reiki Symbols?


Some time ago I remember reading an interview in one of the Reiki magazines in
which either Phyllis Furumoto, or Paul Mitchell (- her co-holder of the Office of
Grandmaster in the Reiki Alliance) stated that there are actually only three Reiki
symbols used in Usui Shiki Ryoho ( - meaning this in the sense of: 'in terms of giving
Reiki treatment'). [We know Takata-sensei taught the sole use of DKM was for
attunement.]
It was only a short while after this (-and some might say it was merely a
coincidence?) that Hiroshi Doi decided to reveal yet another new snippet of 'secret
Gakkai information', i.e:
that there were actually only three symbols in the Usui Reiki Ryoho system...
However, unlike the Reiki Alliance leaders, Doi's meaning was not that the DKM was
solely reserved for attunement purposes. He was claiming that there were only three
symbols. Period.
Three symbols - and the DKM was not one of them!
Doi claimed that the Gakkai doesn't use the DKM, not even for attunement purposes
- and that Usui-sensei didn't use a 'master symbol' at all.
[Though, as Doi himself states, he has not reached the Shinpiden level in the Gakkai
- so he is therefore not privy to the 'Mystery Teachings' of this level. The Gakkai (so
Doi tells us) is a very formal organisation - strictly following rules of protocol and
secrecy - so just how is it that he is supposedly able to say what does or does not
feature in the attunement and other practices used by those who have reached the
higher levels in the organisation ? ]
Hiroshi Doi's claims have apparently also been 'validated' by certain other 'cliquish'
Reiki Masters, though no one is willing (or able?) to say just how they have validated
them! And soon, others started to spread the story, as usual without question...
But then again, just who would they question - Doi, so we are told, is the only one
with direct access to the fabled Gakkai.
(Of course, many are currently questioning whether the Gakkai actually really exists
or whether its 'members' are - to put it politely 'channelled' by Doi…)


DKM - a piece of Artwork?


Hiroshi Doi would have us believe that, originally, the DKM was simply a piece of
calligraphy which Usui-Sensei presented to each of his Shinpiden students.
The way Doi tells it, this piece of 'brush art', was intended as a reminder that their
ultimate aim in life should be the achievement of enlightenment; but that somehow,
over the years, the calligraphy evolved into an actual Reiki symbol…
Interestingly, a simple online search for DKM will eventually lead to the discovery that
- hanging in a place of prominence in most modern-day Ninjutsu Dojo's - one will find
a scroll bearing a piece of calligraphy which reads:
'Shiken Haramitsu DAI KO MYO'
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
2
And the purpose of this scroll?
To remind the martial arts student that their ultimate aim in life should be the
achievement of enlightenment...
So, having been informed that Usui-Sensei himself practiced a form of martial art,
should we view this ninjutsu-related fact as something that 'lends weight' to Hiroshi
Doi's story ?
Possibly.
But personally, I am more of the opinion that Doi's story about DKM simply being a
piece of calligraphy may well have come into being purely as a result of Doi himself
having 'googled' (literally or otherwise) the phrase DKM - in an attempt to seek out
other snippets of information about its wider usage.
[And no doubt he would have also discovered the link with the Sekai Kyusei Kyo and
their 'Scroll of Light'... or would he?]
DKM, as Doi teaches it?
So why then - if the DKM was not actually a Reiki symbol and neither the Gakkai, nor
Usui-Sensei, ever even used a master symbol of any sort - does Doi himself teach
the use of the DKM, as a master symbol?
Well apparently, Doi says that having been used and 'believed in' by so many Reiki
practitioners over the years, the DKM has developed a life of its own, and has
become empowered as a viable symbol in its own right.
(An interesting twist, I feel - that somehow we, the collective Reiki Community, rather
than Usui-Sensei - are responsible for creating and empowering the 'master symbol'
which we use to attune others to Usui-sensei's Reiki Phenomenon!)
If not Usui-Sensei, then who?
And if the DKM was not originally the Reiki 'master symbol' - if there wasn't even the
concept of a 'master symbol' - how and when did DKM become the 'master symbol'?
Who is responsible?
[I admit I find it really quite fascinating - the way this whole process works. It's really
quite a clever 'mind-game' - you claim an accepted 'fact' (such as DKM being an
original Reiki-symbol) to be untrue, but instead of even bothering to work out a clear
and rational alternative scenario, you simply offer snippets of information here and
there - snippets of information that will logically invite further questions - and hey
presto! this opens up a 'creative space' into which other inquiring minds are drawn, to
engage in further speculation - further 'flights of revisionist fancy' - on your behalf!]
In an attempt to 'fill in the missing links' it has been suggested that Hayashi sensei
may have created the concept of a 'master symbol' exclusively for Takata-sensei (as
to why he should have done this - or even felt the need to do so - well, 'flights of
revisionist fancy'…).
And, as to why Hayashi-sensei - who, from what we can gather, was concerned with
developing Reiki as a therapeutic modality (rather than a spiritual discipline) - would
add to the system's 'powertools' something like the DKM - which has strongly
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:54

spiritual overtones, intimating as it does, of the Radiant Wisdom of Deity?
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
3
Well, here is yet further opportunity for 'flights of revisionist fancy'.
It has also been suggested that Takata-sensei invented the master symbol herself -
which means we would have to assume that Hayashi-sensei must have either given
her, shown her, or at least told her about, the DKM calligraphy (supposedly only used
as a piece of inspirational artwork) ['flights of...']
[It really is so easy to get drawn into this speculative 'mind-game'!]
In support of this theory that it was Takata's creation, it has been pointed out that one
of Hayashi-sensei's other students, Chiyoku Yamaguchi (founder of Jikiden Reiki)
didn't use or teach the DKM master symbol - she had not received it from Hayashisensei.
Was this because Hayashi-sensei himself did not have it to use or teach? ['flights
of...']
(Or maybe Hayashi-sensei was simply experimenting with different ways of teaching
what had afterall by this time evolved into Hayashi Reiki Ryoho - perhaps this was
why Chiyoko Yamaguchi didn't receive the DKM as a master symbol from him?)
[Chiyoko Yamaguchi did not begin her Reiki training until after Takata-sensei had
completed her Master level training, which included the use of the DKM]
But there is also another possible explanation why Chiyoko Yamaguchi didn't receive
the DKM from Hayashi-sensei:
Some time back on at least one Reiki forum, questions were raised about whether or
not Chiyoko Yamaguchi ever actually undertook the Master Level with Hayashisensei.
Not long after this, it was revealed that Mrs. Yamaguchi had actually completed her
training, not with Hayashi-sensei, but with her uncle, Wasaburo Sugano, who it
seems was one of Hayashi-sensei's master-level students...
The fact that Sugano did not teach the DKM as the master symbol, does not
necessarily mean that Hayashi-sensei did not.
It has also been commented that (interestingly I thought), it was only after her son,
Tadao, had attended a 'western' style Reiki seminar that the Yamaguchi's began to
talk about Mrs Yamaguchi's training with Hayashi-sensei…
Mrs. Yamaguchi claimed she used have a number of notes (apparently copied from
Hayashi-Sensei's own Reiki notes), but that these were later lost in a fire during a
time when she was living in Manchuria.
Her certificates seem to have also gone the same way...
But all this is beginning to lead away from the issue of Hiroshi Doi's 'mind-game'
claims that originally DKM was not the 'master symbol' - not a Reiki symbol at all…
Just as well, though, because if you were expecting a nice neat conclusion to this
piece, there isn't one.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
4
Because, at this point I'd just like to introduce yet another new snippet of 'secret
Gakkai information', courtesy of Hiroshi Doi.
According to Doi, the most important and powerful Reiki symbol is…
the HSZSN…
* * * * * * *

SOME MORE ON THE REIKI SYMBOLS...


Copyright © 2006/7 James Deacon
# Which came first - symbols or kotodama?
Some versions of the 'new' history of Reiki would have us believe that the four
symbols were not part of Usui-sensei's system in the early days - and that the
functions within the Reiki system now ascribed to the four symbols, were originally
ascribed to four mantra-like utterances derived form the practice known as
kotodama.
But how plausible is this theory?
Let us consider, for example, the symbols HSZSN and DKM.
We must remember that the distance and master symbols are not 'symbols' in the
abstract sense ( i.e.'glyphs'), but are rather, are actual phrases written in Japanese
calligraphy, and these particular pieces of calligraphy read, respectively, as the
words hon sha ze sho nen and dai ko myo.
Now in the kotodama-derived practice, which it has been claimed predated the
introduction of the symbols, the 'phonomes' or syllables uttered with the intent of
producing the effects more commonly associated with the distance and master
'calligraphy-symbols' are actually modifications of the phrases HSZSN and DKM
themselves [hon sha ze sho nen has been 'deconstructed'/reduced to 'ho a ze ho ne',
and dai ko myo to 'ai ku yo']
Thus, can we not infer from this that, the HSZSN and DKM 'symbols' must have
come first (- in order that the phrases could later be modified in order to produce the
forms used in the kotodama-style practice)?
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
5


# CKR - a Buddhist Symbol?


I have heard several people asserting that the CKR is a Buddhist symbol, however I
have never found any evidence to suggest that the CHR symbol has ever been used
in Buddhism (yes of course, there are variations on the spiral pattern that is part of
CKR used in Buddhist symbolism, but not the complete CKR itself)
# Symbols only introduced to help people feel the 'energy'
Some other versions of the 'new' history of Reiki, would also have us believe that the
four symbols were not part of Usui-sensei's system in the early days (- no mention of
kotodama here!)
This time, we are asked to believe that the symbols were supposedly introduced at a
later date simply as a medium through which to assist people - primarily the Naval
contingent who had joined (and to all intents and purposes, taken over) Usui-sensei's
dojo - who were apparently having difficulty feeling the 'energy' .
But how likely is this?
Three of the Reiki symbols are derived from Buddhist symbols.
So just how well would this have gone down with the Imperial Navy - Usui-sensei
utilising a set of essentially Buddhist symbols to aid the Navy - an instrument of an
overtly Shinto-centred state - to practice healing?
# On not keeping the symbols and their mantras/names secret
The four Usui Reiki symbols are indeed considered Sacred by many of us - but
sacred is not the same as secret.
And, I feel, it is important to remember that while many westerners tend to think of
the Reiki 'symbols' as being four arcane, mystical 'glyphs', two of the four are simply
words written in Japanese kanji (Chinese Characters)
There are many thousands of kanji characters - some highly obscure & only very
rarely used; however every Second Grade student in Japan is expected to be familiar
with the three kanji: dai, ko and myo.
So if every Second Grader is familiar with the kanji for 'DKM' - how can we claim
DKM is secret?
And every Fourth Grade student in Japan is expected to be familiar with all the kanji
used to write HSZSN
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:54

In a similar vein, the suggestion that the symbol's Japanese 'names' should not be
spoken out loud in public is a bit like suggesting, for example, that English-speakers
should not be permitted to speak the everyday words 'great bright light' (DKM).
In fact, some years back the phrase 'DKM' (- a big/great bright light) was apparently
used as part of an advertising slogan for a Japanese company selling Flashlights!
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
6


Further, I feel we also have to remember that the symbols/their names are not
exclusively the 'property' of Reiki
For example:
It is generally accepted that the SHK symbol is essentially a poorly rendered version
of the Buddhist 'seed symbol' Kiriku (pronounced somewhere between K'rik and K'lik
in Japanese)
Now while Kiriku is a Sacred symbol (being the 'spiritual emblem' of both Amida
Butsu and Senju Kannon Bosatsu) and has secret significance to those initiated in
the Mikkyo (esoteric) traditions within Buddhism, the symbol itself is not secret. In
fact it is to be found on public display all over Japan.
The DKM also has central significance within the religious group known as Shumei
(founded by Mokichi Okada - originator of the healing practice called Johrei ). As a
sacred Shumei symbol, is openly on display in Shumei centres.
DKM is also of great importance in the practice of Johrei itself - particularly in relation
to the ohikari or 'focussing pendant' used at the third level of this healing practice.
The term Choku rei [though perhaps not the symbol itself] is an important concept in
the beliefs of both the Byakkõ Shinkõkai and the Omoto kyo spiritual groups [though
the Omoto kyo primarily use the alternative 'reading' of the Choku rei kanji: Nao Hi]
And as for the HSZSN - a version of it even crops up in historical 'magical charms'
used by the Ninja !

# The Symbols and the Initiation process


In the initiations as used and taught by Takata-sensei, the symbols were used oh so
sparingly compared to the way many people use them today.
For whatever reasons, many people - including several of the '22' - have felt the need
to modify Takata-sensei's initiation process.
Many versions of initiation/attunement process now call for all four symbols to be
used in passing each level of Reiki.
However Takata-sensei taught that only certain symbols were used at each level.
Most importantly, the DKM was only written during the level 3 attunement. Only its
mantra was used in passing the level 1 and 2 initiations.
I personally feel it is down to issues of insecurity on the part of several early post-
Takata 'masters' (not trusting in the inherent power of each symbol and the need only
to use it as Takata-sensei had taught) that we've ended up with people using all the
symbols at all the levels. A case of 'Belt and Braces' gone mad!
# The Symbols and different 'energies within Reiki'?
In Takata-sensei's day the symbols had very specific proposes:
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
7
There was one symbol to focus, concentrate and intensify the effect of Reiki; another,
to facilitate the healing of psychological issues; yet another, to form a temporary
meditative connection between Practitioner and Client at a distance; and finally, one
solely for use in initiating Reiki Masters.
Reiki was understood as a single, unified, integrated energy. There was never any
talk - never any concept - of the symbols either representing, or connecting the
Practitioner or Client to, different 'energies within Reiki' or - as it is sometimes
expressed - different aspects or qualities of the Reiki energy.
This idea of the symbols being linked to different energies, or different aspects or
qualities of the energy, was one of the many new perceptions which developed within
western Reiki in the years after Takata-sensei's passing.
And gradually, as various forms of western Reiki were imported into Japan, this
thoroughly modern, western 'New Age' perception of the symbols also found its way
into the newly-evolving Japanese Reiki, and it was not long before we were being
asked to believe that not only was this in fact an original Japanese perception, but
that this was the primary reason why Usui-sensei had introduced the symbols into
Reiki in the first place: to assist certain students in differentiating between the various
different aspects or qualities - the various 'energies within Reiki' ...!!


# 'Symbol 1', 'Symbol 2', etc...?

Hiroshi Doi received his initial western-style Reiki training from Mieko Mitsui (though
apparently later, he 'remembered' that he had actually received Japanese Reiki
training - albeit by a different name - from a Japanese practitioner some years prior
to meeting Mitsui!)
Due to the nature of the teaching structure in the form of Reiki taught and practiced
by Mieko Mitsui (variously known as Authentic Reiki, Real Reiki or The Radiance
Technique), she herself was only qualified to teach levels 1 and 2 in the art.
In this particular form of Reiki, at level 2 the student was taught the standard three
symbols, however, unlike in the more familiar Usui Shiki Ryoho, at this level, the
symbol's names/mantras were not taught (this being something reserved for a higher
level in the system). Instead, the symbols which were referred to as 'cosmic patterns'
were simply identified by numbers. Quite probably, none of Mitsui's level 2 students
(including Hiroshi Doi) would have even been aware that the symbols had
names/mantras.
Is it mere coincidence then, that later, when Hiroshi Doi claimed to have made
contact with the 'original' Usui Reiki Society, he also claimed (for a while at least) that
in this 'secret' Reiki organisation, the symbols were referred to, not by names, but
simply as 'Symbol 1', 'Symbol 2', etc...?
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
8

REIKI SYMBOLS

- Facts, Fiction or 'Japanese Whispers'?


Copyright © 2008 James Deacon
Probably most people have now heard the often-repeated story of how, supposedly,
in the beginning Usui-sensei did not teach the use of symbols to his students - that
the symbols were something he added to the system later in it's development, in
order - it is suggested - to help students feel and differentiate between certain
aspects of the 'energy'.
Of course the story could be true. [And this would be a very short article.]
However, it has on occasion been suggested that this story is simply a modern fiction
- an attempt at creating a piece of 'supporting testimony' intended to lend weight to
the views held by some within the Reiki Community who would wish to eradicate use
of the symbols from the discipline entirely.
Usually the thinking is expressed something along the lines of "Well, if the symbols
weren't part of the original system they can't be that important - can't really be all that
relevant -can they? So lets just ditch 'em!"
[- and, I feel, comments to this effect are probably often followed by the silent
thought: "Afterall, I never could quite get the hang of remembering how to draw them
complicated little ****ers!]
Strangely, several of those people in the pro-"ditch the symbols" camp, also claim
that Reiki has its origins strongly rooted in Esoteric (Mikkyo) Buddhist practice. [It
would seem such people are completely oblivious as to the essential and
empowering role of symbols (to effect both 'this-worldly' and 'other-worldly' healing
and transformation) within the Mikkyo traditions...!]
So, the story that the symbols were something Usui-sensei added to the system later
in it's development: Truth? Fiction?
There is of course another option - that the story has its basis in some sort of fact, yet
due to a mild case of 'Chinese Whispers' (or in this instance 'Japanese Whispers' !) it
has become ever so slightly confused on its journey down through the years to us.
What if the original story - the fact behind the whispers - rather than stating that the
symbols were something only introduced to the system later in it's development,
simply actually spoke of how the symbols were something only introduced to the
student at a later stage in their development?
We often hear how, in Takata-sensei's day, the symbols were considered something
to be kept secret. [1]
However, it may be more correct to say that rather than it being just a matter of
simply not letting non Level 2 Reiki folk see the symbols - it was a case that even the
very fact that there were symbols at all was to be kept secret.
Not only were the symbols not shown to, or even discussed with, Level 1 students,
the very existence of symbols was not even mentioned.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
9
While the symbols were obviously used by Takata-sensei as part of the Reiki
initiations (though, of course, not all symbols were used in every level initiation), it
was not until Level 2 that the symbols, their form and usage, were introduced to the
student as part of their training.
It may well be that the primary reason for wanting to keep the symbols (/their very
existence), secret from those doing Level 1 training, was to keep the student's focus
'in the present moment'; rather than fueling their curiosity, imagination, and
impatience to move on to 'higher' things - when they had not yet even learnt and
integrated the basics of what the system had to offer at the earliest stages of training
Likewise, the Level 2 student, having been introduced to the three symbols at that
level, was not informed about the fourth symbol.
It was only on being accepted as a level 3 [2] student that the existence of this final
symbol was revealed.
Jump back now to the 1920's...
From several different sources, there have been several somewhat different
accounts as to the level-structure within Usui-sensei's system in the early years.
However, we know from the Question and Answer section of the Usui Reiki Ryoho
Hikkei, that Usui-sensei divided training into three (main [3]) tiers or levels: Shoden,
Okuden, and Shinpiden
And while some of the developmental and therapeutic practices taught at each of
these levels may not have survived intact - essentially, this training structure was
very similar to the "Level 1, Level 2, Master Level" structure most of us in the West
are familiar with via Takata-sensei's teachings.
It is said that Usui-sensei's students numbered somewhere in the region of two
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:55

thousand, with the greater majority of these being Shoden level.
Far fewer would have received training at Okuden; and we are told, less than 20
received Shinpiden level - i.e. became Teachers.
As we have seen, in Takata-sensei's day, even the very existence of the symbols
was kept secret from Level 1 students; and it is fair to assume that it would have
been no different with Usui-sensei's Shoden level students.
In discussing their training and practice amongst themselves, or - should the be
tempted to - in sharing information about the system with family, friends or even
outsiders, there would be no knowledge of symbols - only mindfulness in applying
'hands that bring healing'.
As far as these Shoden level students would be aware, there were no symbols used
in this therapeutic art.
Likewise, those students who had reached the next stage in their development - the
Okuden level - would only be aware of there being three symbols - would not have
even heard of there being a fourth.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
10
Which leads to the question - the sources who claim that "originally there were no
symbols in Reiki"
- is it simply that their information comes (however indirectly) from students who
never progressed beyond Shoden level training?
And for that matter - the sources who more recently have begun to claim that "there
were only ever three symbols in Reiki, not four"
- is it simply that their information comes (however indirectly) from students who
never progressed beyond Okuden level training?
_______
NOTES:
[1]
While the four Usui symbols are considered by many of us to be Sacred (or at least, of sacred
significance), ever since two of the symbols were first revealed in a Reiki book: 'The
Challenge To Teach Reiki' by A.J. MacKenzie Clay, (published in 1992), the belief in the need
to keep them secret is no longer generally considered relevant.
[2]
Or as Takata-sensei had called it [on the certificates she issued] the 'Advanced' level.
[3]
Though it would seem that these levels may have themselves been divided into a number of
subsections at different periods over the short few years during which Usui-sensei taught his
system
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
11

THE REIKI SYMBOLS: (IN)FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS


Is it best to learn Reiki with a Japanese master or at least a Westerner
who is a master of Japanese Reiki? I want to learn Reiki like Usui and
Hayashi taught it, not with all the add-ons, changes and confusion I'm
told exists in western Reiki.
Well, IMO, the only way for you to be absolutely certain you are learning Reiki "like
Usui and Hayashi taught it"; would be for you to invent a time machine, travel back in
time and study with them directly.
And as for "add-ons, changes and confusion", contrary to what many would have us
believe, this is not something unique to styles of Reiki originating in the West.
On closer inspection of 'Japanese' Reiki, we can see that all is not exactly as
authentic, add-on free, and brimming with clarity as the hype would have us believe.
To begin with, even today, probably the greater majority of Reiki masters in Japan
practice and teach styles of Reiki which originated in the west at a time after Takatasensei's
passing, or alternatively, practice and teach styles which are derived from
(or at very least are heavily influenced by) modern, western, Reiki styles.
Many Japanese Reiki Masters teach Karuna Reiki, or Seichim, or other Western
styles which are only loosely based on Usui Shiki Ryoho. And even those who do
teach Reiki under the name 'Usui Shiki Ryoho', generally tend to teach the modernday
version as commonly taught in the west (Something which, with all its talk of
chakras, and crystals, and Reiki Guides and 21-day cleansing periods, etc.,etc.,
Takata-sensei herself might have a hard time recognising as Usui Shiki Ryoho...)
Although, Takata-sensei tells us that she taught Usui Shiki Ryoho classes in Japan in
the mid 1970's *, it was not until the mid 1980's that the first classes in a modified
form of Reiki (devised by one of Takata-sensei's students) were taught in Japan and
as a result, Reiki (in this modified form) gradually began to become known on the
Japanese 'New Age' scene.
At least a couple of 'home grown' Japanese Reiki styles have evolved out of this
particular modern Western Reiki style (though these Western influences are usually
played down, with much being made of formative influences apparently having been
drawn from obscure Japanese sources...)
And it is fair to say that, just as in the west, in Japan you will also find Reiki
practitioners who are not averse to creating new symbols, adding new practices, and
otherwise modifying and embellishing things to suit their personal views and beliefs...
And of those who claim to teach 'traditional' Japanese Reiki, well it seems there is
more than a little confusion and misunderstanding as to what actually constitute the
'traditional' teachings.
Take the Reiki symbols for example:
First we were told that originally there weren't any symbols used in Reiki, that they
were something added - almost as an afterthought, it seems - supposedly as a
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12
means of helping people with poor levels of sensitivity to feel the 'energy' - that they
were of no real importance (though if this was the case, just how drawing some
unimportant 'squiggles' would help improve sensitivity, was never explained...)
Then it was claimed that the four symbols (referred to as 'shirushi'[1]) were no longer
taught as part of 'Japanese' Reiki, yet that they were still shown to students out of
historical interest.[2]
Apparently the symbols did not have names; they were simply referred to as Symbol
1, Symbol, Symbol 3, and Symbol 4.
However, later, we were told the symbols did indeed have names. Oh, and there
were only three, not four....
Yet at least one of those Japanese practitioners who claim there were only three
symbols, actually teach and use four symbols themselves...
And then, apparently - whereas in Usui Shiki Ryoho (as originally taught by Takatasensei)
the names of the symbols were also mantras used in conjunction with the
drawn symbols – well it seems in 'Japanese' Reiki the symbol names were not
mantras; we were asked to believe that the symbols had separate mantras, in
addition to the names (which er, they apparently didn't have, or...?!)
And while for a time at least, we were told that the phrases we in the west knew as
the name/mantras accompanying each symbol were indeed the symbol mantras (but
not their names), apparently some great mystical occurrence took place outside the
range of our awareness, as, suddenly the phrases we in the west knew as the name/
mantras accompanying each symbol, which had indeed been the symbol mantras
(but not their names), were now no longer – had never been - the symbol mantras
(or their names...)
According to one Japanese practitioner, the name for what, in Usui Shiki Ryoho, had
been referred to as the 'power symbol', was not 'Choku rei', but Zui-un[3]
However, according to another, the name was Kumo[4]
Yet another teaches that the name is/was Un[4]
Some Japanese Practitioners draw the actual 'power symbol' itself very similarly to
the way in which Takata-sensei was taught to draw it by Hayashi-sensei; though
somewhat disconcertingly, the version used and taught by a couple of prominent
Japanese practitioners is suspiciously similar to a modern alternative version of the
power symbol, created in the late 1980's by an 'independent' Reiki master of
Austrian(?) origin.
Some teach the 'power symbol' at level 2, as Takata-sensei was taught to do by
Hayashi-sensei, yet others teach their version of this symbol at level 1.
Some teach the 'power symbol' as a means of intensifying the Reiki-flow; others,
merely as a way of increasing byosen sensitivity.
As to the accompanying mantras (which, may - or may not - have originally been
referred to as 'jumon'[5] in Japanese):
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Well, some claimed that the 'power symbol' - this Zui-un, or Kumo, or Un - didn't
actually have an associated jumon.[6]
However, according to others it did.
One claims the jumon was... 'Un'.
Though this 'Un' used as the jumon or mantra apparently isn't the same 'Un' as the
'Un' used by others as the name of the symbol (depending, that is, on who you ask)...
It seems that in a desperate case of 'clutching at straws', certain Japanese Reiki
practitioners had been attempting to manufacture a link between the Reiki symbols
and symbols used by the Kurama Kokyo sect (based at the temple on mount Kurama
since 1949).
The Kurama Kokyo worship a triune deity: Sonten - the three aspects of which are
represented by the deities Mao-son, Bishamon-ten, and Senju-Kannon.
Now, in this trinity, Mao-son is seen as representing 'the power of Sonten'.
Mao-son's emblem is the Sanscrit character 'hum'. In Japan this is pronounced 'Un'.
And as Mao-son is seen as the 'power', it would seem it was only a short (if
uncreative and misguided) jump to the conclusion that the emblem of Mao-son was
most likely associated with the Reiki 'power symbol'.
Hence, the jumon associated with the 'power symbol' must have obviously have been
'Un' all along...
Some, went further than this, claiming that not only was the word 'Un' the jumon of
the 'power symbol' but that the visual depiction of this Sanscrit character 'Hum'/'Un'
was actually the original form of the 'power symbol'; and that two further Sanscrit
characters - representing Senju-Kannon and Bishamon-ten - were respectively the
original forms of the 'mental/emotional' and 'distance' symbols...
Of course, it seems others had created different 'truths'...
Some claim that the 'mental/emotional' symbol (which didn't have a name?) was
apparently originally called Muryou-ju,[7] or depending on who you ask: Mugen
Muryou-ju [7]
Some claim its jumon is Fukuju[8]; though others claim Fukuju is its name, not its
jumon...
Though yet others have said the jumon is actually a 'modified' version of the more
familiar 'Seiheki'.
And some say the 'mental/emotional' symbol does not have a jumon.
While some use the 'mental/emotional' symbol in conjunction with recitation of the
Gokai ('Reiki Principles').
Some Japanese Practitioners draw the actual 'mental/emotional' symbol itself very
similarly to the way in which Takata-sensei was taught to draw it by Hayashi-sensei;
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:56

however, others use what can only be described as a partial/incomplete version of
the symbol; and yet others still, use a modified form of this latter incomplete version.
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14
As to what is referred to as the 'Distance symbol' in Usui Shiki Ryoho:
Well, most Japanese Practitioners, it seems, draw the actual 'distance symbol'
symbol itself very similarly to the way in which Takata-sensei was taught to draw it by
Hayashi-sensei, with minor variation in the number of strokes used (some use 21,
some 22).
According to some Japanese Practitioners, the jumon is pronounced Hon Ja Ze Sho
Nen (the Ja is another 'reading' of the kanji pronounced as Sha in the more familiar
form: Hon Sha Ze Sho Nen).
Others do not consider the symbol to actually be a 'symbol' as such - claiming rather
that drawing/writing the visual aspect of what we deem the 'distant symbol'
constitutes part of reciting a jumon...
Some claim the vocalised element (i.e. the jumon-proper) should be pronounced Hon
Ja Ze Sei Nen (the Sei is another 'reading' of the kanji pronounced as Sho in the
more familiar form: Hon Sha Ze Sho Nen).
As for the 'master symbol':
Some Japanese practitioners would have us believe that the 'master symbol' was not
traditionally part of Reiki at all (but rather an add-on, originating several years after
Usui-sensei's passing!!)...
However, of those Japanese practitioners who do use and teach the 'master' symbol
(and this group actually includes some of those who claim the 'master' symbol is not
a original Reiki symbol !!), most, it seems, draw the symbol in its regular three-kanji
form.
And, just as happened in the west after Takata-sensei's passing - where many and
varied new uses were dreamed up for the 'master symbol' - so too in Japan the
symbol is widely used far beyond its sole original purpose[9]
While most also tend to use 'Dai Ko Myo' as the jumon, some apparently vocalise
'Dai Mitsu Mei' instead. [Simply for the sake of being different, perhaps?].
(Mitsu is simply another 'reading' of the kanji pronounced as Ko in the more familiar
form: Dai Ko Myo, and Mei is another 'reading' of the kanji pronounced as Myo).
And as is the case with the 'distance symbol', no doubt there will also be some who
claim that the 'master symbol' is not a 'symbol' at all - that drawing/writing the visual
aspect (i.e. the three kanji) merely constitutes part of reciting a jumon...
______
Notes
[* See: http://www.aetw.org/reiki_in_japan.htm]
[1] Shirushi - a sign, symbol, 'glyph' or graphic visual representation; also a mark
made with a stamp or seal.
[2] Interesting, as at that time many western practitioners were also no longer using
the symbols...
[3] Zui-un translates as 'Auspicious Cloud' ( – a good omen). It is also the name of a
brand of Aloeswood Incense!
[4] Kumo and Un are two alternative 'readings' of, i.e. ways of pronouncing, the same
kanji character meaning 'cloud'
[5] Jumon - an incantation; a spell, a charm; a magic word, 'words of power'/ 'words
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15
filled with spirit'.
[6] or at least, they themselves had not been taught its jumon
[7] Muryo-ju = 'Infinite Felicitation' or 'Uncountable Blessing' - also the name of a
specific manifestation of Amida Butsu.
Mugen = Infinity, Infinite Compassion, Infinite Wisdom, Unconditional Light
[8] Fuku ju means something like "a long and prosperous life" (used as a toast, it is
much like saying "Cheers!").[It is also the name of a popular brand of sake]
[9] i.e. as part of the initiation process
What can you tell me about the symbol “tamarasha”? I heard it is a fifth
symbol of reiki used for grounding someone?
Tamarasha is part of Reiki as practiced by SOME people, but it was not part of any
style of Reiki prior to the mid 1980's.
You will find that people incorporate all manner of symbols, beliefs, practces from
totally unrelated healing disciplines, spiritual beliefs and other 'New Age' interests
into their personal Reiki practice - unfortunately many folk also present these 'addons'
as actually being part of the system as devised and taught by Usui-sensei.
Tamarasha is actually the central symbol in a modern system of symbol-healing
called Kofutu.
The symbol was 'channeled' by Kofutu's founder, Frank Homan.
According to Frank, Tamarasha is the name of an 'Ascended Master' he works with.
Is it true that Mrs Takata taught different versions of the symbols to
different students?
Actually there is very little evidence to support this (to all intents and purposes it is
something that falls in the category of 'Reiki Myth')
At the first meeting of the majority of Reiki masters - in Hawaii in April 1982 - it
emerged that Takata-Sensei had taught each master somewhat differently (- i.e. she
had adapted her approach slightly with each student, as any good teacher would)
It also emerged that a couple of the students were 'writing' the symbols ever-soslightly
differently from most of the others [Takata-sensei frequently spoke of 'writing'
rather than 'drawing' symbols]
As a result, some folks later claimed that Takata-sensei had shown different students
very different versions of the symbols.
However, it is generally accepted that the minor differences which actually existed
were primarily due to mis-rememberings on the part of the students (generally,
Takata-sensei did not allow students to keep copies of the symbols) .
While later, endless different versions of the original symbols began to appear, [due
to students intentionally modifying symbols and their meanings/significance as taught
by Takata-sensei, to suit their own purposes], originally, the primary differences
seemed to be in the way a couple of the students wrote HSZSN (which is of course
for many folk the most difficult symbol to master)
It also emerged that there were what seemed to be two or three slightly different
versions of the DKM.
However, it must be remembered that these two 'symbols' DKM and HSZSN are in
fact phrases written in Japanese kanji and just as there are several ways of writing
words/phrases in the 'roman' (English) alphabet, eg: Block Capital and lower-case
letters of numerous different 'font' styles, and also cursive /handwriting script - with
most individuals having their own style - so too with Japanese writing.
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Essentially there are four main Japanese writing styles, and if anything, the 'different'
versions of the DKM are due to nothing more than the phrase being written in a
couple of different styles….
Since I received my attunements, my Reiki master has begun to use a
new symbol in place of one of the symbols I was attuned with, and has
requested that we all use the new symbol when attuning students of our
own. Do I need to get re-attuned with the new symbol in order to be able
to use it?
Personally, I feel that you have to have experienced a symbol (via attunement)
before you can really use it effectively - and especially so, if you wish to use it to
attune others. It doesn't matter even if the new symbol is only slightly different to the
one you were actually attuned with, the differences may be very subtle, but there will
be a difference.
I have been taught that each Reiki symbol has its own colour and should
be visualised in that colour?
While several people do teach that each of the four symbols has its own colour, in my
research I have not found any suggestion that, originally, the symbols were ever
associated individually with specific colours.
This supposed colour-association seems to be yet another addition to the neverending
list of Western, New-Age 'add-ons' - elements which have been adopted-in to
Reiki since the passing of Takata-sensei. (So much of what is today presented as
Usui Shiki Ryoho was in fact never taught by Takata-sensei herself.)
To make matters worse, such adulterated forms of Reiki healing practice have also
been imported into Japan, and many of these western add-ons have managed to find
their way into various forms of 'Japanese' Reiki, where they are being passed on to
students as though they had always been part of native Japanese practice.
In many instances where people currently allot colours to the symbols, it has a
connection with the 'non-traditional' meanings/associations these people (or their
teachers) have overlaid on the symbols - e.g. the erroneous belief that CKR is
somehow connected with the Earth/the elemental earth energy, often leads folk to
connect it with the colour green; and so on.
In traditional Japanese practice (whether Buddhist, Shinto or Omyodo[Taoist]
-influenced), symbols the kind used in Usui Reiki Ryoho would normally all be
visualised in either gold or pure, colourless, bright light.
In specific cases, such symbols might be visualised in silver, or for 'talismanic'
purposes, in red (many protective and healing amulets are written in red ink on
yellow paper, and at a certain level, the Usui Reiki symbols can be placed on a par
with such protective devices). It would be rare for such symbols to have their own
individual colours.
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Should we use all three second-degree symbols together when doing
treatments, or just use certain ones?
Well (IMO) that would depend on two things: 1, which form of Reiki you have been
attuned/trained in; & 2, what you happen to be doing at the time.
For example in 'pure' Usui Shiki Ryoho:
if you are giving a distance Reiki treatment, then you use the HSZSN to connect to
the person, followed by the CKR (you would also use SHK if doing a 'habit'
treatment)
If you are not working at a distance you don't use the HSZSN. Period.
If you are treating an ache, a very minor cut, or other 'simple' physical injury, while
you may use the CKR, you probably wouldn't need the SHK
SHK can come into the equation when there is psychological-emotional
shock/trauma (however minor) connected with the physical injury etc. (though
perhaps there may actually be some level of emotional shock/trauma accompanying
'simple' physical injuries - a paper cut for example!) .
If the client has had a fall, been in an accident, etc, etc, then they would almost
certainly be suffering from associated emotional shock/trauma (as well as from the
physiological shock /trauma), so you could use SHK as well as the CKR.
This would also help prevent the build-up of what is often referred to as
'emotional body-armour' around the area of injury, and will contribute greatly to the
self-healing process. SHK can also be used to release-clear pre-existent 'emotional
body-armour' associated with old injuries which although technically healed, are still
causing the client discomfort or other problems.
Also, if you are treating a purely stress-related problem of any kind where there is no
physical injury, etc. you would use SHK.
You would use SHK and CKR together in behavioural modification treatments - be it
Takata sensei's version of the technique or the 'Japanese' version: Seiheki chiryo-ho
Is it true some Japanese warriors used the Reiki DKM as a sign of
protection when entering unfamiliar buildings, and some modern-day
Japanese businessmen still do this when going to important business
deals?
Yes - and no.
There is indeed a common practice [handed down from the or warriors of old] in
which one uses 'Dai Ko Myo' as a form of protection, not just on entering buildings,
but in any situation where you feel you need protection or an advantage (including in
tactical military situations or even business negotiations).
However, this use of 'Dai Ko Myo' has no direct Reiki connection.
'Dai Ko Myo' in this context (as used as a sign of protection) should not be confused
with the symbol DKM as used in Reiki Ryoho.
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It predates the origination of Usui-sensei's system by several centuries.
As mentioned elsewhere in this site, 'Dai Ko Myo', as distinct from its significance as
a Reiki 'symbol', has symbolic importance in Japanese Buddhism. It can be seen to
represent great 'Enlightened Nature' - Spiritual Radiance - and by extension, is
considered by many to be a strong protective force, manifesting as 'great bright light'
(or 'great shining light')*
The practice employed by various warriors and others, involved the use of the
phrase 'dai ko myo' – not in the sense of the Reiki symbol, but rather in the sense of
a broader, more commonly used meaning of these words.
This protective practice involves visualising yourself surrounded by an intense
protective aura of 'great bright light' ['Dai Ko Myo'] (- or often 'White Light': Hakko - so
the practice could also be spoken of as visualising the 'dai hakko myo' rather than the
'dai ko myo').
There is of course a similar practice commonly to be found in western
spiritual/psychic traditions.
The term Dai Ko Myo has also often been used by the 'warrior priests' known as
Yamabushi (or Yamafushi), to refer to yet another, far more esoteric, Buddhist
symbol - one of great importance - though again, not one with Reiki-significance:
Dai Ko Myo or the 'Great Ko Myo' is another name for the 'Komyo Shingon'**- the
'Mantra of Light' (or, Enlightenment Mantra) - which, chanted or visualised, is
considered to be a powerful charm of protection as it is believed to encompass the
entire power of the Supreme Buddha Dainichi.
Yamabushi (and many others) have used the visualisation of the complex written
form of this mantra as a form of protection, and illumination.
However, it must be understood that, while the name dai ko-myo can be applied to
the Mantra of Light - the written form of this Mantra is not the three kanji familiar to
Reiki practitioners as the Reiki DKM.
The Mantra itself does not even include the words 'dai ko myo'.
__________
*In general usage, the Japanese words 'dai', 'ko', and 'myo' simply mean a great or
intensely bright light - any bright light. (The phrase Dai Ko Myo has often appeared
on advertizing for Flashlights!)
**Shingon in this context does not refer to the Shingon sect of Buddhism, but simply
means 'true word'(i.e mantra)
Sometimes the Ko-myo Shingon is also referred to by the name Dai Ko-myo Shingon
(Great Mantra of 'Light')
In Diane Stein's book Essential Reiki she teaches something called the
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Mer 1 Lug 2009 - 11:56

non-traditional dai ko mio symbol. Where does this come from?
This 'non-traditional' symbol is actually a version of a symbol known as Dumo, which
has been modified to look more like the 'mystic spiral' found in western 'neo-pagan'
traditions.
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The symbol Dumo (aka: the Tibetan Master Symbol) comes from Raku Kei - a Reiki
style created by Arthur Robertson who claimed (though there has never been any
proof) that Reiki originated in Tibet.
Why should we have to learn to say the symbol names or mantras in
Japanese? Why not just use the English translation? Same question about
the actual distant and master symbols - aren't they just the names drawn
in Japanese writing? So why not just write the English words instead. It
would be much easier.
Well, for a start, learning how to pronounce the Japanese phrases, and draw the
stylised kanji that make up these two symbols, is a basic sign of commitment on the
student's part - it shows a willingness to make an effort to learn...
It is also a useful exercise in Mindfulness: focussing the attention
Then there is a matter of showing respect, and gratitude:
- taking the time to learn (and it really doesn't take that long) the correct form of the
symbols and the pronunciation of their names/jumon is one of the many ways in
which we honour the Gift that is Reiki.
And while we certainly know the English translation of the kanji used as symbols 3
and 4 - perhaps it says something about the inherent spiritual importance of symbols
per se, that, on bringing Reiki to an English-speaking society, Takata-sensei
translated everything concerning Reiki into English - except for the word 'Reiki' itself,
and the Symbols: their forms and names.
I was taught [Ishikuro/Robertson lineage] that if you use the master
symbol on a client during treatment this 'implies you accept full
responsibility for their healing'?'' Why is this?
If I recall correctly, the original thinking was that the Master symbol was considered
purely as an initiatorial symbol, so in attempting to use it on a 'client' in a healing
context, you would in fact be 'passing attunement' to them.
From the Tibetan teachings brought in by Arthur Robertson who (- with input from Iris
Ishikuro) created Raku Kei Reiki, came the understanding of the Teacher's karmic
responsibility for their student (which, in using the DKM on them, the 'client' had now
- albeit unintentionally - become).
In just about every initiatorial tradition I am aware of, it is a very serious matter for a
teacher to take on a student. A student is said to be (for want of a better term) 'tied' to
the teacher/master - through a karmic bond.
Whether in Tibetan Vajra tradition, or in the Mikkyo traditions of Shingon and Tendai,
the teacher/master (Mikkyo: Ajari) is karmically responsible for the student until the
student becomes a 'master' in their own right and takes on the responsibility for the
'karma' in relation to the teachings they are being empowered with/into.
Being karmically responsible for the student ('client') would also include responsibility
for their healing.
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Do the symbols have to be imprinted in the chakras for the practitioner to
be able to use them to intensify the healing produced by the Reiki energy?
The whole concept of chakras is really alien to Japanese healing practices (one -or
more - of Takata sensei's students, it seems, introduced the chakra system into Reiki
probably in the late 70's as a frame of reference for New-Age oriented westerners).
"...use them to intensify the healing produced by the Reiki energy?"
Perhaps we in the west think too much about Reiki in terms of 'energy' (something
that we have re-imported back into Japan)
Reiki is - to my mind - more 'Spiritual Phenomenon' than 'Energy'.
Rather than seeing it that healing is 'intensified' by the symbols - it might be better to
say that the symbols bring focus ( -mindfulness) to the whole 'Process of Sharing'
that is the Reiki Experience.
To infer that symbols are 'used to intensify the healing produced', seems to me to
suggest that healing is something that the practitioner 'does' to the client.
When a Reiki Practitioner and a Client enter into the Sharing Process that is the Reiki
Experience, the Practitioner is simply the Facilitator for the Experience, Reiki is the
Catalyst, the Client themself is the Healer....
I was shown an attunement where the Reiki Master drew symbols on the
student's middle fingers. Is this a standard practice?
It is currently believed by many researchers that Reiki was strongly influenced by
elements of Mikkyo (esoteric) Japanese Buddhist practice.
Mikkyo speaks of a Buddhist elemental system known as 'godai': the 'Five Elements'
(-not to be confused with the Chinese Five Elements system).
Everything in the universe is perceived to be a manifestation of five great elemental
'building blocks' - referred to as: Earth, Water, Fire, Wind/Air, and Void/Sky/Ether.
Earth gives substance; Water holds things together; Fire heats or transforms;
Wind/Air is responsible for movement; & Void/Sky/Ether connects with the creative
source.
In the godai system, the middle finger is seen to be directly connected with 'ka' -
elemental Fire - and in particular, with heat in the body
Picking up on this point, some Reiki practitioners believe that attuning the middle
finger directly will help increase 'ka' - the fire element, and with, it increase the 'hot
hands' sensation which is considered the sure sign that you have actually 'got' the
attunement.
However godai is all about a balanced interplay of all 5 elements - too much Fire can
increase the passions - but also increases aggression and anger...
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(so ideally, if people are working with finger-tip attunements, they should attune all
the fingers [and thumb] to maintain the dynamic balance)
I am looking to make Buddhist connection to Reiki. In your opinion do the
Reiki symbols link to these Buddhas: CKR for Dei Seichi Bosatsu, SHK for
Monju Bosatsu, HSZSN for Ashuku Nyorai, DKM for Amida Nyorai ?
Why do you feel the need to link the Reiki symbols to individual Buddhist Deities?
CHR is not a Buddhist Symbol - it is possibly of Shinto origin. On one level, it may be
seen an invocation of the Blessings of the Kami [- choku rei = 'Spirit Direct from God']
SHK is the only Reiki Symbol with any direct connection to an emblem of a particular
Buddha. SHK is based on the shuji symbol "kiriku".
Kiriku is used in Japanese Buddhism to symbolise Amida Butsu - Buddha of
Compassion. (and also to symbolise the bodhisattva, Senju Kanzeon).
To draw the kiriku is - for followers of either of these two Deities - to invoke their
power/Blessing.
But, this does not mean that, in Reiki symbolism, SHK necessarily has any direct
connection with either Amida or Senju Kanzeon.
HSZSN is not a 'symbol' per se - it is actually a mantra reminding us of the need for
Mindfulness in ones undertakings - not a symbol of a specific Buddhist Deity (though
'Mindfulness' is the 7th step in the Noble 8-Fold Path of Buddhism.)
And as for DKM, in a Buddhist sense, it signifies the great Komyo –'Enlightened
Nature' or 'the Radiant Light of Wisdom' - the Radiance of a Deity - not of one
specific Deity, but any expression of deity - be it in the form of a Buddha,
Bodhisattva, 'Vidyaraja', etc. ( -even a Shinto kami for that matter)
My Reiki master taught me that the CKR power symbol should be drawn
clockwise to focus the energy, but now I have been told by another
teacher that this is a mirror image of the original CKR symbol - and also
that one version is for putting energy in and the other for drawing energy
out?
Over the years since Takata-sensei's passing there have been many new meanings
and associations added to the four Usui Reiki symbols (and also, it seems, elements
of the original meanings have often been removed or obscured - albeit unwittingly).
In addition to this, several people have made changes to the actual forms of the
symbols themselves [presumably in an attempt to make them 'fit' with their own
personal views & perceptions]
It was not till the 1980's (after the death of Takata-sensei) that mirror-image versions
of the choku rei started appearing.
Up to this time there was only one choku rei - and it was always drawn (from the top):
from left to right, then the vertical line down, and then an ANTIclockwise spiral
inwards to the centre.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
22
There was no concept of drawing choku rei one way to 'put in' energy and drawing a
reversed or mirror-image version to 'draw out energy' (for the simple reason that this
was not what the symbol was about)
The first proto-version of the 'reversed' choku rei actually seems to have originated
(albeit unintentionally) with one of Takata-sensei's master-level students: Iris
Ishikuro.
Iris was a follower of Johrei Healing (- an outgrowth of the Shumei religion) and
introduced a new symbol into her Reiki practice. Named 'White Light', this symbol
was a stylised version of a piece of calligraphy sacred to Johrei and the Shumei.
The proto-version of the reversed choku rei is actually part of Iris's 'new' Reiki symbol
It is in the lineages coming down via Iris that the reversed choku rei in its 'proper'
form seems to have originated, first truly becoming popularised by Kathleen Milner as
part of her Tera Mai system.
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
23
__________________________________________________
If you found this Reiki E-Book of help, then please “Pay it Forward”
by supporting
THE DIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND INTERNATIONAL
http://www.gorillafund.org
Dedicated to the conservation of gorillas and their habitats in Africa
through anti-poaching, regular monitoring, research, education
and support of local communities.
__________________________________________________
If you have your own web site, perhaps you might also be willing to help by placing
this banner / link in a prominent position on some of your pages.
Thank you
Download more FREE pdf-format Reiki documents at:
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
24
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
25
The contents of this E-book may be updated from time to time.
The availability of newer versions of this E-Book will be publicized on the
downloads page at: http://www.aetw.org
USE OF MATERIALS
You may freely publish the material contained in this e-book on your own website,
or in your Reiki Manuals*, newsletter*, or other 'not-for-profit'* publication
( - you may also translate it into other languages )
providing you publish it in its entirety
- including full Author and Copyright credits,
and:
If used on a website, you provide a live link back
[from the page where you place the material] to:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
If used in a manual*, newsletter*, or other printed medium*, you clearly credit:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
as the source of the material.
*There must be NO FINANCIAL GAIN from the use of this material.
If however, you do wish to include this material in a 'for-profit' publication,
you must seek and receive my express permission before doing so.
_______
If you simply wish to quote extracts from this material,
please make it obvious that they ARE extracts - i.e. use quotation marks
- and again clearly credit the source of the material.
Please do not use quotes out of context.
THANK YOU
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MessaggioOggetto: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 6:51

FONTE: http://www.aetw.org

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Reiki History
& Reiki Myth:
- another look at some elements
of the 'new' History of Reiki
[Parts 1 & 2]
by
James Deacon
[Version 1.00]
Copyright © 2008 James Deacon
NOT FOR SALE
Copies of this E-Book may be distributed
WITHOUT CHARGE to anyone you wish.
It may also be distributed WITHOUT CHARGE in printed form
- providing it is done so in its entirety (including end-pages).
Permission is NOT given to add to, subtract from,
or otherwise modify this document in any way, shape or form.
[See foot of document for further details re: Use of Materials from this E-book]
THANK YOU
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
2

REIKI HISTORY AND REIKI MYTH:

Another look at some elements of the 'new' History of Reiki...

[Parts 1 & 2]
[Copyright © 2008 James Deacon]
Part 1
For long, the facts as we knew them in the West were that Usui-sensei had been a
Christian (- and not just a Christian, but a Christian Minister - and that the Reiki
healing system (while not having any connection with Christianity itself) had
essentially come into being as a result of Usui-sensei's quest to discover how Jesus
had performed his healing miracles
However, by the late 1980's / early 1990's, when Reiki was beginning to pick up
momentum in its spread throughout the New Age community, the idea of Usui being
Christian Minister wasn't all that fashionable.
In fact, for many New Agers, it was a rather uncomfortable, even slightly
embarrassing, idea.
No doubt, for a lot of people, part of the reason they had begun to explore New Age
ideas in the first place, was out of a need to find an alternative spirituality - to get
away from what they saw as the 'dogmatic control' of a Christian upbringing - and so,
to discover that the founder of the Reiki system had been a Christian Minister, well …
Now as fate would have it, around this period, it would seem that several different
individuals had (quite independently of each other) begun to attempt to verify certain
elements of the History as it had been handed down to them.
Amongst other lines of enquiry, a few people decided to contact the two Universities
mentioned in the History:
Doshisha University, in Kyoto - where they had been told Usui-sensei had been both
a Minister and, in some accounts, University President, and
the University of Chicago - where Usui-sensei was said to have studied as part of his
quest to discover how Jesus had performed his healing miracles.
One of the people who contacted the Universities was the Reiki master, William
Rand.
In November 1990, he received a reply from the University of Chicago stating that:
"…our records do not indicate that Mikao Usui ever attended the University of
Chicago"
The following year Rand also contacted Doshisha University, and received a
response (December 1991), stating that the name Mikao Usui " never appeared" on
the lists of graduate students, nor on the list of faculty and clerical members. Also
that "… he was never the president of Doshisha"
Of course this information must have come as quite a shock to many Reiki folk - and
we can only imagine the various ways in which people sought to come to terms with
these - as some saw it - serious errors in the account of the History of Reiki.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
3
However, it seems that some folk - notably those who were not all that comfortable
with the whole Christian element of the History in the first place, actually saw these
discrepancies as, well, as a 'godsend'.
For these people, this was a great opportunity - a chance to edit things - revise
things.
And so, revise they did.
All too swiftly, a "New Authorised" version of the History of Reiki began to take
shape.
And in this new version, not only was Usui-sensei not President of Doshisha, nor a
Minister at the University - now he was not even a Minister at all, in fact he was not
even a Christian at all.
Usui-sensei was now a Buddhist[1] - always had been - and if anyone questioned why
it had ever been claimed otherwise - well the parroted response was that Takatasensei
had, at best been confused, at worst, made the whole thing up.[2]
After all, Buddhism was far more acceptable to many New Agers than Christianity
was, and of course, in the History, Usui-sensei was said to had studied in a Zen
monastery, and eventually found the 'keys' which would lead to the manifestation of
his system of Reiki Healing in Buddhist sutras[3]
And gradually, over time, in response to any who would dare to even innocently
question this particular element of this new revisionist version of Reiki History by
raising the topic of 'Usui the Christian' - there began to develop a series of 'stock'
replies, including:
"Well, he couldn't have been a Christian, could he - he's buried in a Buddhist
graveyard" [4]
and
"You see, it's obvious to anyone who knows even a little about Japanese history that
Usui couldn't have been a born a Christian. Christianity had been outlawed for
hundreds of years in Japan, and the ban wasn't lifted until Usui was about 8 years
old, so there weren't any Japanese Christians when he was born."
and
"Of course we know Usui wasn't a Christian - both the 'Gakkai and one of his
surviving students - a Buddhist nun called Mariko - have confirmed he was a
Buddhist all his life..."
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
4
However, even now it is seldom ever pointed out that there is probably less evidence
to confirm the existence of either this 'surviving student' or the modern-day Gakkai,
than there is to confirm that Saddam Hussein ever had any 'Weapons of Mass
Destruction' ...
Also, in the History of Reiki as recounted by Takata-sensei, there was no mention of
Usui-sensei having been born a Christian - no mention of his early years at all… and
for that matter, no mention of him having died a Christian either. (Takata did not say
Usui was a Christian all his life. For example, there is no mention of him returning to
his duties as a Christian Minister after receiving the 'Reiki Experience' on Kurama
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Yama)
And actually, as we will see, there were Christians in Japan at the time of Usuisensei's
birth - quite a lot of Christians….
Roman Catholicism had been brought to Japan in 1549, and for the next half century
Christianity thrived - with ever-growing numbers of converts. Some estimates put the
number of Christians in Japan by the end of the 16th century to be in the region of
300,000.
However, after the Tokugawa Shogunate seized political control at the very
beginning of the 17th century, things began to change.
Partly because it came to be seen as a medium through which 'European Interests'
could gain sway over the hearts and minds of the Japanese people, Christianity
came to be viewed as a threat to the Shogun's power-base, and a period of everincreasing
levels of suppression ensued.
In time, this led to the Tokugawa government issuing an edict formally banning
Japanese people from practicing the Christian faith; and orders were issued exiling
foreign missionaries and also many prominent Japanese adherents of the religion.
Rather than leave the country, many of the (European) Roman Catholic priests went
into hiding.
Large numbers of the faithful also openly refused to renounce their Christian beliefs.
So they were offered a simple choice - recant, or die. Many recanted.
Many were executed.
In time, seeking to further rid itself of Western influence (and the possible threat of
the Europeans gaining too much power in the country) the Shogunate eventually
decided to implement a policy of isolationism - expelling not just the missionaries but
all Europeans, and ending all trade with European nations ( - with the exception of a
small amount of strictly controlled trade with the Dutch)
Yet even after this, the Christian faith in Japan was by no means eradicated.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
5
Historians believe that somewhere in the region of 150,000 Japanese Christians
outwardly renounced their beliefs, yet continued to practice their faith, worshipping in
secret.
And for more than two centuries, generations of these - as they were later named:
senpuku kirishitan ("underground Christians") - often living in isolated, self-contained
rural communities - would continue to worship in secret, knowing that if they were
discovered, they would be executed.
And during this period, it is estimated that somewhere in the region of 40,000 were
discovered and executed…
Over the centuries, these underground Christians had been without prayer books,
Holy Scriptures or any of the identifying paraphernalia and formal rituals of the
Church - all of which had, of necessity, been given up to lessen the chance of
discovery.
Outwardly, the senpuku kirishitan had had to present an appearance of being
adherents of Buddhism or Shinto (the distinguishing lines between these two faiths
were often very blurred).
Theirs had become a religion of oral transmission, and down through the years, their
faith had undergone varying degrees of transformation, absorbing as it had, various
understandings and attitudes drawn from Buddhism, formal Shinto practice, and also
from local folk beliefs.
In many ways, the religion of the senpuku kirishitan had evolved into what could best
be described as a form of 'Folk Christianity'.
In 1853, a small fleet of US warships had arrived at Uraga harbour at the entrance of
Edo Bay, demanding that Japan open its ports to full trade with the West.
As a result of centuries of self-imposed isolation from the rest of the world, Japan's
military forces had not evolved technologically, and thus, realising its inability to
effectively defend itself - should the US decide to be more 'forceful' in pursuing its
demands - the Shogunate had little option but to agree; and by 1854 Japan had
signed friendship treaties with not only the US, but also the UK, France, Russia and
the Netherlands.
At the time of Usui-sensei's birth in 1865, Christianity was indeed still outlawed in
Japan (at least, that is, for the Japanese themselves. The re-opening of the
Japanese ports for foreign trade had led to an influx of Roman Catholic and other
Christian missionaries - ostensibly to minister to the ever-growing number of
Westerners living in the many newly-established foreign enclaves).
While banned from propagating Christianity amongst the Japanese people, it seems
that the various missions were allowed to provide medical treatment, and carry out
educational work.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
6
Even after the fall of the Shogunate, and the establishment of the Meiji government
(1868), it was still illegal for Japanese Citizens to practice Christianity. (About 3,000
Japanese Christians were arrested during the first two to three years of the Meiji era)
Yet things were about to change.
Under pressure (economic and otherwise) from the US and other western nations,
the Meiji government was forced to 're-think' its religious policy, and eventually
formally lifted the ban on Christianity in 1873.
While several of the senpuku kirishitan had already cautiously revealed their
existence to greatly-surprised Roman Catholic missionaries prior to 1873, with the
lifting of the ban they were now free to openly to receive fresh instruction and reeducation
in the catechism and the formal rites of the Roman Church (from which,
over their 200+years of seclusion, their practice had to varying degrees strayed).
And while many senpuku kirishitan did indeed happily return to Catholicism, many of
these previously 'underground' Christians chose not to - preferring to hold fast to
beliefs and traditions (including ancestor-worship[5]) which had developed over
perilous centuries of evading discovery by the authorities.

Part 2

That Usui-sensei's family were senpuku kirishitan is of course not beyond the bounds
of possibility[6]
However it is perhaps more likely that Usui-sensei, if he was a Christian, became one
at a time some years after the ban on Christianity had been lifted - perhaps during his
teens or early adulthood.
Usui-sensei obviously had an enquiring mind, a great appetite for learning - and, it
seems had embarked on a quest for new meaning in his life. We are told that he had
studied widely, gaining amongst other things a good understanding of history,
divination, incantation, various religions (including Buddhism, and Shinto), medicine,
physiognomy and psychology, etc., and it is quite likely that his studies would have
also included western Philosophy and Christianity - both of which had become very
popular areas of study with the Japanese.
And if Usui-sensei had 'experimented' with Christianity (just as today many Western
'seekers' experiment with Eastern faiths and philosophies, including Hinduism,
Sufism, Taoism, and various sects or denominations of Buddhism) well there were
certainly a considerable number of different of Christian denominations to choose
from…
As mentioned, with the reopening of Japan's ports to western trade, as well as the
Roman Catholics, missionaries from numerous different denominations had also
begun to establish a presence in the country
Amongst the different Protestant denominations eager to bring their own version of
Christianity to the Japanese people were:
Presbyterians, Baptists, Anglicans, Methodists, Lutherans, Episcopalians, Unitarians,
Congregationalists, and Dutch Reformists.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
7
By 1872, the first Japanese Protestant church, the Nihon Kirisuto, had been
established.
The same year had also seen the establishment of a Japanese branch of the
Russian Orthodox Church.
And over time, numerous Christian schools - some boys-only, some girls-only, some
co-educational, sprang up.
There were also several Christian Academies and Seminaries of various
denominations, and in time, several Christian Universities would also be created.
At its core, the Meiji Restoration was all about modernisation, westernisation, and
industrialisation - about the Great Japanese nation, crippled by endless years of
isolationist policy - seeking to catch up with the rest of the world.
Whereas, in the past, the Tokagawa government had sought to rid Japan of western
influences, the Meiji government now sought to embrace the West and all it had to
offer in terms of science, technology, philosophy, etc, etc
The Japanese government began hiring dozens of western advisors with expertise in
areas of economics, politics, education, industry, etc. And, over time Japan, adopted
the western calendar, western educational formats, a western-style political systems
(including the adoption of a Constitution), and so on.
In fact, so strong was the drive towards westernisation that several influential people
including Mori Arinori and Saionji Kimmochi[7] even advocated making English the
new language of the modern Japanese nation.
Many Japanese citizens adopted western modes of dress, (including top hats and
walking canes), and the Japanese appetite for all things western became almost
insatiable.
Many wealthy Japanese families sent their children overseas to get a western
education (something encouraged by the Meiji, and later, Taisho governments as
part of Japans modernisation-process)
However, certainly in the first half of the Meiji era, the majority of educational
establishments set up within Japan itself were funded and run by Christian
Missionaries
With the Japanese hungry to acquire western learning, the various Christian missions
took full advantage of the situation - any opportunity to propagate their faith.
Providing education was an ideal means of gaining converts.
During the Meiji and early Taisho eras, many Japanese converted to Christianity.
While it is important to point out that the majority were genuinely seeking a new
moral, ethical, and philosophical 'code' more in keeping with the Meiji eras drive
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
8
towards modernisation and Internationalism, it must be stated that there were also
those who viewed Christianity with a purely pragmatic eye
- as simply means to an end - the primary reason for conversion being in order to
procure a good comprehensive western-style education. After all, a good education
meant good prospects.
And so, with Christian missionary establishments providing access to western
educational formats, it was not that uncommon for families to convert to Christianity
(even if only nominally so), in the hope that a western-style education would help
their children secure positions in either the government or the military
The early years of the Meiji era had brought great upheaval to the structure of
Japanese society - most notably to lives of the old nobility: the Samurai
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 6:52

In 1871 the Samurai had been banned from carrying swords.
They had lost most of their power and privilege, and their old feudal way of life was
being systematically swept away.
During the early part of the Meiji era, a great many people from old Samurai (i.e.
Buddhist) families converted to Christianity.[8]
Again, it is important to be clear that while, for some, this was no doubt a purely
pragmatic move, probably the majority of converts were genuinely drawn to
Christianity seeking a new 'way' - searching for something to provide a new sense of
meaning in their rapidly changing lives.
In fact, the first Japanese person to have been ordained as a Protestant minister had
been of Samurai stock.
However, he had been drawn to the Christian faith in the years immediately
preceding the Meiji restoration - at a time when the Samurai were still powerful - and
Christianity was still banned ...
In the years immediately following the reopening of Japanese ports to foreign trade, it
was still very difficult for Japanese citizens to get permission to leave the county, yet
in 1864, a 21 year old samurai named Niijima Jou (1843-1890) secretly found
passage on a ship to the U.S. (via China) with the intent of studying Christianity and
science
Settling in Massachusetts, he attended Amherst College and Andover Theological
Seminary; eventually, in 1874, becoming ordained as a Protestant minister.
However, at the time, had you contacted either Amherst College or the Andover
Seminary enquiring as to whether or not an individual named Niijima Jou had
attended their establishment, you may well have received an answer something
along the lines of the one William Rand received from the University of Chicago,
concerning Mikao Usui (see above)
i.e., that their records did not indicate that Niijima Jou ever attended the
establishment.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
9
And the reason for this?
In the US, Niijima Jou, had adopted the name Joseph Hardy Neesima. (Jou became
Joe became Joseph, Niijima became Neesima, and as to the middle name, Hardy,
this was the surname of the people who sponsored his stay in the US)
And in taking a westernised name, Niijima Jou / Joseph Hardy Neesima could
perhaps be seen to have set a precedent.
For, over the years it became a not too uncommon practice amongst Japanese
students travelling to western countries to adopt western names (or at very least,
westernised versions of their original Japanese names)[9]
[Which begs the question: Could it be that when Usui-sensei went to the US[10] he
had also adopted this practice?[11] ]
For some, like Neesima, the westernised name was a baptismal one[12] - an outward
sign of the individual's Christian faith[13] , for others, taking a western name was
simply part of their immersion in western culture, part of their desire to 'fit in'.
On returning home, some kept their western names (a statement of their
westernisation/modernisation), some did not.
Niijima Jou, on returning to Japan in 1874, retained the westernised name Joseph
Hardy Neesima.
In 1875, he opened his own Eigakko (Academy) in Kyoto.
Initially having only eight students, Neesima's academy steadily grew into an
important centre for education, and by 1920, had evolved into a full-blown, private
Daigaku (University) - yet it still bore its original name: Doshisha.
[Part 3 of “Reiki History & Reiki Myth” will be included in a future version of this e-book]
_________
NOTES
[1] Though, as to which specific denomination of Buddhist -well even now in 2008 there is still
no clear consensus on this.
[2] Perhaps it was also during this period that the poorly thought-out notion that Takata-sensei
had manufactured the Christian connection to make Reiki more approachable to westerners
first manifested itself?
[3] It is perhaps interesting to note how some elements of the History were kept intact, while
others were ditched.
[4] Of course the same reasoning could possibly also be used to argue that Usui-sensei
wasn't a Tendai Buddhist (as has been claimed) - afterall, he is buried in a Jodo Shin
Buddhist cemetery...
[5] Most importantly, those ancestors who had been martyred for their Faith.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
10
[6] Though I feel it is important to point out that there is absolutely no evidence to suggest that
they were.
[7] Both Mori Arinori (1847-1889) and Saionji Kimmochi (1849-1940) served as Japanese
Minister of Education. Mori Arinori was appointed to the position in 1885, Saionji Kimmochi in
1894.
[8] It has been suggested that Usui-sensei was of Samurai ancestry (Chiba clan)
[9] Even today, some Japanese people working abroad choose to adopt English names
(though nowadays, usually only first names), in an effort to fit in. Commonly the adopted
name will have the same initial sound as their Japanese names; for example, Tomita might
simply be shortened to Tom or become Thomas, Kenichi might become Ken or Kenneth.
Yoshio - Josh or Joshua
- and theoretically, Mikao might become Mike or Michael…
[10] We know from the inscription on the Memorial stone at Usui-sensei's grave that he went
to the US.
[11] Note the careful phrasing of the reply received by William Rand - "…our records do not
indicate that Mikao Usui ever attended the University of Chicago" - as opposed to a clear
"Mikao Usui definitely did not attend the University of Chicago" or similar phrasing.
[12]Even the senpuku kirishitan - the 'underground Christians' - had taken ( -albeit secretly -)
western baptismal names
[13] In much the same way that many westerners, on becoming a (for example, Tendai)
Buddhist, may not simply receive a Japanese Buddhist name in addition to their birth-name,
but as a sign of their new-found faith, choose to actually replace their birth-name their newly
acquired Buddhist one
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
11
__________________________________________________
If you found this Reiki E-Book of help, then please “Pay it Forward”
by supporting
THE DIAN FOSSEY GORILLA FUND INTERNATIONAL
http://www.gorillafund.org
Dedicated to the conservation of gorillas and their habitats in Africa
through anti-poaching, regular monitoring, research, education
and support of local communities.
__________________________________________________
If you have your own web site, perhaps you might also be willing to help by placing
this banner / link in a prominent position on some of your pages.
Thank you
Download more FREE pdf-format Reiki documents at:
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
12
The contents of this E-book may be updated from time to time.
The availability of newer versions of this E-Book will be publicized on the
Free Reiki E-books page at: http://www.aetw.org
USE OF MATERIALS
You may freely publish the material contained in this e-book on your own website,
or in your Reiki Manuals*, newsletter*, or other 'not-for-profit'* publication
( - you may also translate it into other languages )
providing you publish it in its entirety
- including full Author and Copyright credits,
and:
If used on a website, you provide a live link back
[from the page where you place the material] to:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
If used in a manual*, newsletter*, or other printed medium*, you clearly credit:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
as the source of the material.
*There must be NO FINANCIAL GAIN from the use of this material.
If however, you do wish to include this material in a 'for-profit' publication,
you must seek and receive my express permission before doing so.
_______
If you simply wish to quote extracts from this material,
please make it obvious that they ARE extracts - i.e. use quotation marks
- and again clearly credit the source of the material.
Please do not use quotes out of context.
THANK YOU
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MessaggioOggetto: Miscellaneous Reiki Articles   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 6:58

FONTE: http://www.aetw.org


http://www.aetw.org
Miscellaneous
Reiki Articles
- vol. 1
by
James Deacon
[Version 1.00]
Copyright © 2008 James Deacon
NOT FOR SALE
Copies of this E-Book may be distributed
WITHOUT CHARGE to anyone you wish.
It may also be distributed WITHOUT CHARGE in printed form
- providing it is done so in its entirety (including end-pages).
Permission is NOT given to add to, subtract from,
or otherwise modify this document in any way, shape or form.
[See foot of document for further details re: Use of Materials from this E-book]
THANK YOU
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
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REIKI NO MICHI
(The Way of Reiki)
Copyright © 2002 James Deacon
All you need to know…
Reiki:
Calms the Mind
Empowers the Soul
Fills the Heart with Compassion
Warms the Hands
Heals the Body
Anything less and its not Reiki - no matter what anyone says
All you need to do…
Receive Reiki Treatments to balance & harmonise your Vital Essence
Once balanced & harmonised, receive Reiki Attunements
Once Attuned, give Reiki Treatments to others,
to balance & harmonise their Vital Essence
Once balanced & harmonised, give them Reiki Attunements
Anything less and you're not doing Reiki - no matter what you say
Receiving Treatments,
Receiving Attunements,
Giving Treatments,
Giving Attunements:
This is the
'Reiki Circle Of Life'
* * * * * * *
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TO PONDER...
Copyright © 2006 James Deacon
# "Reiki comes in through the crown ..."
It is frequently said that Reiki enters via the top of the head - i.e. via the Crown centre
- then flows down through the other energy centres...
So how come, at the culmination of his 21-day meditation on Kurama-yama, Usuisensei's
Reiki experience began when the 'light' (DKM) struck him - not on the top of
his head - but rather in the middle of his forehead?
# Where does Reiki...? (a "beginner's mind" question)
Ok, so people often ask the question "where does Reiki come from?"
But have you ever wondered: Where does Reiki go to?
I mean, you give someone Reiki - lots of Reiki - in some cases, day after day, for
several weeks. The person gets better
(- or alternatively, chooses not to). So, what happens to all the Reiki that has been
channeled to them?
Has it been: 'used up' ? transformed into somethng else [if so, what]? does it just stay
there, pervading the person's aura? does it 'bleed out' - escape back into the ether?
Or something else?
# Feeling the Reiki?
When we speak of 'feeling the Reiki energy', are we actually feeling the Reiki energy,
or are we simply feeling an energetic response - a response within our own bodyenergy
– a response elicited by the phenomenon that is Reiki?
# Uchideshi
In 1935, Takata-sensei had travelled to Japan to inform her parents of the death of
one of her sisters in Hawaii (also bringing her late husband's ashes to be interred in
Kyoto).
After receiving Reiki treatment for several health conditions, she was accepted as a
student of Reiki by Hayashi-sensei, and began an internship at his clinic.
Some months later, Takata-sensei's parents left Japan to return to Hawaii, and we
are told that Takata-sensei moved into the Hayashi's home.
Now to 'western' minds, little significance is placed on this fact (- other than perhaps
a fleeting thought that the Hayashi' were kind to give her a place to stay), and, other
than to express her gratitude to the Hayashis,Takata-sensei herself did not 'make a
big thing' of it when recounting information about this time in her life.
However, in Japanese culture, a student being invited to live as a member of their
teacher's household (no matter what the nature of the discipline they are studying) is
seen as something of great significance. It is a great honour - something only
bestowed on a student who displays the highest potential.
To be invited to live with the teacher's family is to become uchideshi ('inside student')
- a live-in student who receives special training - with a focus on becoming the
teacher's successor...
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# The Gokai 'User Instructions'
The instructions accompanying the Gokai tell us:
"Mornings and evenings sit in the gassho position and repeat these words out loud
and in your heart. For the improvement of mind and body…"
Perhaps they should also include something to this effect:
"From morning to evening, live these words with every breath you take.
For it is in their application in the midst of daily life that the fullness of their power
truly manifests..."
# Reiki without permission...
Some people, when faced with the ethical dilemma of offering Reiki when it has not
specifically been requested, work with the intent that if it is rejected by the intended
recipient, the Reiki go to the nearest living thing that will accept it (or simply, that will
not refuse it)
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 6:59

So what happens if the nearest living thing happens to be the bacteria or a virus
(both living beings - however simple in nature) which happen to be threatening the
life of the intended recipient?
# From reiju to denju...
Many people are seemingly of the opinion that, as Usui-sensei originally worked with
the incremental reiju process as a means of 'awakening' the Reiki Ability in his
students, then it must have been someone else - such as Hayashi-sensei - who
devised the denju (initiation) process as used by Takata-sensei.
But why? Are we expected to believe that, having begun to work with his reiju
process (as opposed to Hiroshi Doi's reiju - or Chris Marsh's, for that matter), Usuisensei
never experimented: never modified the initial process, never attempted to
improve on it? Or, perhaps, if he found something more effective, even replace it?
We know Usui-sensei's system went through various evolutionary changes - e.g. the
incorporation of the gokai, the introduction of a grading system, the gradual increase
in emphasis on the therapeutic side of his system, where previously the focus had
been primarily on Spiritual development.
We are also told that the symbols were not a component of the therapeutic side of
the system in the very early days - that they were something Usui-sensei introduced
at a point during its continued evolution - this action in itself marking a quite
significant shift from earlier practice.
Now, as the symbols are a vital part of the denju process, could it be that their
introduction coincided with the shift (whether immediate or gradual) from reiju to
denju ?
That a denju process (possibly only a proto-version of the more familiar, later denju
process) came into use as the direct result of a need for a more effective 'delivery
system', as it were, for the newly introduced symbolic keys we are now all familiar
with?
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# The Usui Memorial - Usui Rei-Ho
The memorial stone which stands next to Usui-sensei's grave in the grounds of the
Saihoji Temple, Tokyo, bears the one and only known public account of Mikao Usui's
work (and, for that matter, of his very existence). If we are to accept its authenticity
(and there has been some speculation about this), the stone was erected in
February, 1927 - less than a year after Usui-sensei's death.
The inscription on the stone is written in an old form of Japanese (written Japanese
was simplified after WW2) and there have been several translations - either directly,
or via modern Japanese - into English.
However, contrary to what many people seem to believe, in the original Japanese,
the title of the inscription speaks of Usui-sensei, not as the founder of Reiki (nor of
Reiki Ryoho for that matter), but rather, the founder of something called:
Rei Ho (lit. 'the Spiritual Method').
Now, some observant folk, having picked up on this, have attempted to explain it
away by claiming that Rei Ho is somehow a contraction of Reiki Ryoho?
Not only is there no evidence to support this claim, but in the very text of the
memorial stone itself we can clearly read just what Usui-sensei's Rei Ho - his
Spiritual Method for improving mind and body - actually entails.
This Rei Ho does not involve any form of hands-on healing...
Yet the term Reiki is indeed also mentioned in the inscription. In the account of the
meditation on Mount Kurama, it states that Usui-sensei experienced "a large Reiki"
over his head.
"a large Reiki"?
This wording, implying that (at least at the time the inscription was written) Reiki -
rather than being understood in the modern conceptualisation as abstract 'energy',
was perceived to be some 'thing' - a Presence or Spirit of some sort perhaps?
* * * * * * *
BEYOND "UNIVERSAL ENERGY": DEFINING REIKI
Copyright © 2002/3 James Deacon
While the term "Reiki" is used to describe both the system of healing & spiritual
development developed by Mikao Usui, and the therapeutic 'phenomenon' at the
heart of the system, it is this latter - the 'Reiki' itself, rather than the system - that I
wish to focus on here.
When it comes to the matter of a definition of Reiki, a commonly held view amongst
Reiki practitioners, it seems, is: "don't think too much about it - Reiki is experiential -
just do it.." - and of course, in one sense, this is true.
But, on the other hand, as the Shakyamuni Buddha is credited with saying: "With our
thoughts we shape our reality".
So too, I would venture to suggest: "With our thoughts we shape our Reiki..."
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Takata-Sensei's Explanation of Reiki:
When asked what 'Reiki' meant, Takata-Sensei frequently gave a very simplistic
answer, along the lines of: Rei means 'Universal', and Ki means 'Energy'.
[Yet it has been said on more than one occasion that this particular explanation was
something that only came to prominence, probably during the latter 60's, to fit a more
generalised 'frame of reference' of the people drawn to her as potential students]
However, in attempting to transmit a deeper understanding of the meaning of Reiki to
her students, Takata-Sensei spoke of Reiki as:
"...a universal force from the Great Divine Spirit"
and
"...a cosmic energy to heal the ill..."*
and yet more specifically, as:
"God Power".
" It is not associated with any visible material being.", she said of it, "It's an unseen
spiritual power that radiates vibration and lifts one into harmony. This power is
incomprehensible to man, yet every single living being is receiving its blessings..."
[This interpretation of Reiki as: 'God Power' has lead many to the conclusion that, in
giving the 'simplistic' interpretation: "...Rei means 'Universal', and Ki means
'Energy'...", Takata Sensei was actually using 'Universal' in the sense that many
mystics have used it, i.e.: as being a contraction of: 'the Universal' - an alternative
(and intentionally less religious) term for 'the Divine', ' the Numinous' or 'God''.]
The usual way in which Reiki Teachers tend to explain Reiki to new students, is to
opt for the simplistic approach [generally a very good place to start] - the "Rei" part of
the name being translated as "Universal" (though some do explain that in essence, it
refers, more properly, to something Spiritual or Sacred, and can mean "Soul"), and
"Ki", translated simply as "Life-Force Energy" (though a few mention that it also
implies 'Spiritedness', 'Feelings', or the effect of energy in action.)
Some Reiki Teachers, seeking a middle ground between, on the one hand, the more
''Newtonian' / 'scientific' concept of 'Reiki as Energy', and on the other, the more
'Spiritual' concept of 'Reiki as the Power of God', express Reiki as: "Spirituallyinfluenced
(or "Spiritually-guided") Life-Force Energy"; or even as "Charismatic
Healing Radiance".
Others, seeking to play down the (I personally feel, undue) emphasis on the concept
of 'Reiki as Energy', without necessarily using terminology implying 'Things of the
Spirit', prefer to speak of Reiki as an 'Experiential Phenomenon'.
'Reiki' - in common Japanese usage:
In many modern Japanese-English dictionaries, the term Reiki, (written using the
modern style kanji-pair) is given (in common usage) as meaning: 'Aura'.
'Reiki' can also refer to the 'Holy Atmosphere' one experiences at a Shrine, Temple
Holy Mountain, or other sacred site.
And of latter years, probably due to the resurgence of interest in the modality and its
growing popularity - 'Reiki' (written using the 'traditional' or 'old style' kanji-pair) is
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beginning to appear in some modern Japanese-English dictionaries to denote the
'Healing Method'.
The Reiki Kanji themselves:
As a general guide, the meaning of a kanji-pair is derived from a synthesis of
meanings of the individual kanji making up that pair; and so, the meaning of 'Reiki' is
ultimately derived from meanings attributed to the individual kanji: 'Rei' & 'Ki'.
NOTE: We should always remember that the 'romanised' five-letter word: 'Reiki' is
simply a transliteration of the Japanese, and just as in English where (for example)
the words 'rite', 'write' and 'right' all have the same sound, so too in Japanese there
are often many words that sound the same, yet are written in different kanji - and
have very different meanings.
As distinct from 'Reiki' i.e. the spiritual/therapeutic 'phenomenon' associated with
Usui-Sensei, there are also several other, un-connected, written forms of the doublesyllable:
'rei-ki', each having their own distinct meanings - including: sacred ground or
sacred precincts; established rule; cold, chill, cold weather, cold wave, cold air; &
(electrical) excitation.
Here, obviously, we are concerned solely with the 'Rei' and 'Ki' kanji as used to
denote 'Reiki' - the spiritual/therapeutic 'phenomenon'.
As is the nature of kanji in general, the kanji 'Rei' & 'Ki' can have many levels of
meaning.
A linguist (or for that matter, a good academic Japanese-English Dictionary) will
explain that -
'Rei' encapsulates/refers to:
The Divine, the Numinous
The Mysterious
The Supernatural
A supernatural Being or Spirit
The Spiritual nature
Luminosity of the spirit; the luminosity of a God or Sage
Charisma, charismatic power
Inconceivable spiritual ability
The Soul
Something Pure, Unpolluted
Bright, Clear
Goodness
Something wonderful; a wonder
Excellence, Efficacy
A shaman, a person or being with spiritual or supernatural powers
A rainmaker, a diviner
'Ki' primarily encapsulates/refers to:
Heart
Mind
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Influence
Spirit (in the sense of 'Spiritedness')
Feelings
and also:
Will
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 7:00

Intent
Invisible life-force
Vital Energy
The generative forces of Heaven & Earth
The material force of the Universe
Air
Breath
Steam (the kanji for 'ki' implies steam rising from a covered pot of rice cooking over a
fire, with the lid of the pot being lifted by the steam.)
The effect/result of energy being expended
Reiki as 'Energy' or ...
When we speak of Reiki in terms of 'energy', what do we understand by this - many
have a perception akin to that of electricity flowing through a wire, to others it may be
one of 'emoting' or motivating force, yet others still will hold a perception of 'Love'.
As mentioned, Takata-Sensei also referred to Reiki as 'God Power' - something
Spiritual or Sacred.
It is commonly expressed that "Reiki has its own Intelligence" - that it is "Spirituallyinfluenced"
or "Spiritually-guided".
Would this not put it more in the category of 'Energy-Presence' or 'Energy-
Sentience'?
Since the latter part of the 19thC, when metaphysical, mystical, and spiritually
minded people began to adopt a 'more scientific' vocabulary in which to attempt to
express their conceptualisations, it has been a common (and often unconscious)
practice to substitute terms such as 'energy', 'energies', 'vibrations', etc. for
supposedly 'less scientific' terms such as Spirit, Spirits, Presences, etc
So just where does 'Energy' end and 'Spiritual Entity' or 'Presence' begin?
Depending on the given context, the word Reiki can be used to suggest a Spirit, an
Aura - even, in certain cases, to refer to the influence of a Ghost or Ancestral Spirit.
The manifestation of some form of Numinous Being or Presence is a common
concurrence with instances of kantoku (visionary mystical experiences) or satori
(lesser-enlightenments) in Japanese Culture.
The following is an extract from the writings of Morihei Ueshiba - the founder of the
Spiritual Discipline and Martial Art: Aikido - describing his 'satori'-like mystical
experience out of which the art of Aikido was created:
"Then in the spring of 1925, if I remember correctly, when I was taking a walk in the
garden by myself, I felt that a golden Spirit sprang up from the ground, veiled my
body and changed my body into a golden one.
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At the same time my mind and body turned into light. I was able to understand the
whispering of the birds, and was clearly aware of the mind of God, the Creator of this
Universe..."
Now, in the account of Usui-Sensei's experience on Mt. Kurama, recorded on his
monument, it states:
"One day he went to Kurama Yama on a 21-day retreat to fast and meditate. At the
end of this time, he suddenly felt a great Reiki over his head and received spiritual
insight into the Reiki healing method..."
"...a great Reiki over his head..." - this is usually interpreted as meaning he felt 'Reiki
energy' but it may in fact be simply stating that he had a kantoku visionary
experience of a great (in the sense of 'important') Spirit over his head. A vision of, as
Takata-Sensei put it 'God Power' - the Power of God - what in western terminology
we might refer to as the 'Holy Spirit' - an 'energy' in the sense of a Numinous Being
(in the Japanese conceptual view, possibly: a kami, butsu, or bosatsu) rather than
'energy' in our Newtonian understanding of the term.
So, while the commonly-held perception of Reiki may well be that of Healing Energy -
possibly even 'Spiritually-influenced' or 'Spiritually-guided' Healing Energy, perhaps it
may help to deepen the quality of our connection if we allow ourselves to perceive
Reiki - not so much in terms of a 'Universal Energy' - as in terms of a 'Universal
Spiritual Presence' - a 'Holy, Healing, Spirit Presence'.
In this perception, Reiki as a system can truly be claimed to be a system of Spiritual
Healing - a charism - a 'Gift of the Spirit'.
_________
Note:
*It seems that in hearing Takata-sensei speak of Reiki as a "...a universal force from the
Great Divine Spirit" and '... a cosmic energy...' , many of her students took this to mean that
Reiki - as an 'energy' - was something outside of ourselves: something 'out there' - beyond
us. Something we 'channeled', rather than something arising within us. And this is the
understanding these students passed on to their own students.
However, this idea of Reiki as being something external is perhaps only part of the truth...
In a diary entry dated Dec. 10 1935, Takata-sensei wrote about Reiki being:
"...Energy within oneself " - and also about how we must "...meditate to let the "Energy" come
out from within."
Concerning the "Energy" she said: "It lies in the bottom of your stomach about 2 in. below the
navel."
* * * * * * *
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REIKI - TIBETAN ORIGINS? - part 1
Copyright © 2003 James Deacon
In Takata Sensei's 'teaching story' Usui Sensei is said to have discovered a 'key' to
healing in the Buddhist Sutras.
This is the first suggestion that Reiki may have had Buddhist origins. However, as to
precisely which Sutras (there are a vast number of Buddhist Sutras - primarily in
Sanscrit and Pali, but a great many also translated into, Tibetan, Chinese and
Japanese), and exactly what form this 'key' took, was never explained by Takata
Sensei.
[The Takata account also states that in his quest for the ability to heal, Usui Sensei
traveled to the West to study. If this was in fact the case, in the course of his studies
would no doubt have encountered the occidental healing practices which had
become highly popular since the 18th century - the various forms of 'animal
magnetism' or 'animal electricity' (also referred to as Mesmerism or Mesmeric
Healing, ' Stroaking', 'Magnetic Healing', etc); and also various forms of (usually
Christian-based) 'Spiritual Healing'.]
The idea that Reiki was a long-forgotten, ancient Tibetan form of healing,
rediscovered by Usui Sensei, seems to have first been suggested by Arthur
Robertson, a student of Iris Ishikuro (one of Takata-Sensei's 22 'Masters').
Arthur was the creator - in the early 1980's - of the first so-called 'Tibetan' Reiki style:
Raku Kei Reiki.
Tibet has long been seen as the secret fount of seemingly all Spiritual Wisdom - this,
in the main, being due to the 'hype' created in the 19th century by various Esoteric
groups such as the Theosophists, and others, who became obsessed with Tibetan
Esoteric Buddhism, Mysticism and Magic. So perhaps it was only to be expected that
the idea of Reiki being a practice from the 'mysterious land of Tibet' [an idea, it must
be clearly stated, that has never been backed up with any factual evidence] would
grip the hearts and imaginations of a great many of the' new age' Reiki contingent.
The notion that Reiki originated in Tibet became widely popularised as a result of the
marketing success of Diane Steine's book: 'Essential Reiki', which (while not actually
being the first book to do so) became (in)famous for openly depicting versions of the
Reiki Symbols. (However, Steine sought not only to merge Reiki with Tibetan Tantra,
but also with Wiccan 'Goddess-centred' beliefs as well.)
Richard Blackwell (AKA Lama Yeshe Drugpa Trinley Odzer) - a Clinical Psychologist
who claimed to be ordained as both a Tibetan Lama and Japanese Shingon Priest, is
perhaps, along with Diane Steine, one of the primary individuals responsible for
propagating the supposed Tibetan origins of Reiki.
Essentially responsible for the creation of 'Medicine Dharma Reiki', 'Universal
Healing Reiki' and 'Men Chhos Rei-Ki', Blackwell claimed to be in possession of
many of Usui Sensei's original papers, including the very 'Sutra' in which Usui-Sensei
(re-)discovered Reiki.
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Blackwell claimed that this 'Sutra' - apparently called the 'Tantra of the Lightning
Flash' - and supposed to be a Tibetan Esoteric (i.e.. 'Vajra' or ''Tantric') Buddhist text
- outlined a comprehensive healing method - the original 'Reiki'.
Blackwell even went so far as to claim that the 'Tantra of the Lightning Flash' had
been brought to Japan by Kobo Daishi (aka: Kukai), the founder of Shingon - one of
the two major branches of Japanese Mikkyo (Esoteric) Buddhism.
[It is historical fact that Kukai had actually returned to Japan (from China) with the
sacred texts on which Shingon was founded, several years before Guru Rinpoche
(founder of Tibetan Tantric Buddhism) had even taken the Tantric teachings from
India to Tibet. Further, the original catalogue of the texts brought to Japan by Kukai
still exists, and this 'Tantra of the Lightning Flash' is not one of them].
More recently, it has emerged that Blackwell based his whole premise for the Tibetan
origins of Reiki almost entirely on so-called 'channeled' information...
Much of the (unfounded) 'evidence' that Reiki comes from Tibet, revolves around the
fact that in Tibetan Buddhism there is a deity: Sangye Menla referred to as the
'Medicine Buddha' - a Buddha of Healing. It is frequently suggested that this
'Medicine Buddha' is the source of Reiki healing.
However, Sangye Menla is simply the Tibetan name for the Buddhist deity known in
India as: Bhaishajya-guru.
And most of those who are of the 'Reiki comes from Tibet' persuasion seem to either
gloss over (or be unaware of ) the fact that this same Buddhist deity - under the
name:Yakushi - has, from the very outset, played an important role in Japanese
Mikkyo tradition, which as mentioned above, was actually established before Vajra
(Tantric) Buddhism was taken from India to Tibet...
Others of the 'Reiki comes from Tibet' persuasion, cite the fact that Tibetan Buddhist
traditions utilise initiation procedures to confer ability/'spiritual power' from master to
student as evidence - but miss the point that all esoteric Buddhist traditions - Indian,
Chinese & Japanese, etc., also make use of such practices...
Many have claimed that the Reiki Symbols (that is, the four original symbols taught
by Usui-Sensei himself - as opposed to later additions, modifications and 'othercultural
imports') are secret Tibetan symbols.
Now while the origin of the socalled 'power' symbol is still disputed, it is generally
accepted that the 'mental/emotional' symbol is almost certainly a stylisation of a
character [from a form of the Sanscrit script known as 'Siddham' - or shittan in
Japanese] which is used in esoteric Japanese Buddhism as the 'spiritual emblem' of
the Buddha Amida.
The 'distance' symbol and the 'master' symbol however, are actually Japanese
phrases written in kanji characters. While adopted by the Japanese, kanji are
originally Chinese ideograms, not Tibetan characters or symbols. Tibet had (and still
has) it's own independent system of writing. The Chinese system of writing was not
used in ancient Tibet.
* * * * * * *
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Reiki History and Reiki Myth   Ven 3 Lug 2009 - 7:00

WHY BOTHER WITH A REIKI TEACHER
- WHY NOT JUST SELF-ATTUNE?
Copyright © 2006 James Deacon
Reiki ability is something, to quote John Gray (one of Takata-sensei's master level
students), that is passed:
"Hand to hand"
i.e.: from one living person (in whom the ability is already awakened - and developed)
to another (who wishes to awaken and develop the ability)
IMO, it is not something you can self-attune to - unless perhaps, you are willing to go
down the whole "21-days of starvation, prayer and meditation" route as Usui-sensei
did - and maybe not even then.
Numerous others have attempted this - both before and after Usui-sensei - without
achieving anything close to the same results...
There is more to becoming a Reiki practitioner than receiving attunement
Also, I feel, it is important to remember that originally (and even in Takata-sensei's
day,) attunement - be it to master or any other Reiki level - was only one part of Reiki
Training; only one element of the process of awakening and developing the Reiki
ability.
But somewhere down the line, folk began fixating on this one part, in some cases, to
the almost total exclusion of the rest of the training - forgetting that in relation to
Reiki, the concept of 'initiation' - in the fullest sense of the word - while it includes the
energetic 'attunement', also includes the teachings accompanying it [and by
teachings, I refer to more than 'information'].
Often, much of our real 'learning' comes from simply spending time in the physical
company of an experienced Reiki Teacher.
We are not merely gaining 'information' [which we could read in a book/manual], but
are also gaining insights, awarenesses, understandings - in part, via the conscious
process of 'observing and practising' - but perhaps more importantly, subliminally, as
we interact on a subconscious level with the body-language of one experienced in
the Reiki art.
The initiation ritual (i.e. the 'attunement' itself), may constitute the formal aspect of, as
it were: 'fine-tuning the student to the Reiki frequencies'.
However, beyond the 10 minutes or so over which the actual ritual occurs -in fact
right throughout the entire time we spend with the teacher during the course of
training - we are still participating (albeit subconsciously) in a profound 'energetic'
interaction that follows on from, and IMO 'rounds out' the effects of, the attunement
itself.
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SOME THOUGHTS ON REIKI FORA...
Copyright © 2007 James Deacon
Reiki fora (/forums) are 'virtual' micro-communities, and just like their 'real world'
counterparts, are dynamic - in a constant state of flux.
Fora arise; some become popular, some do not.
Some are cliquish, limiting their focus to a particular lineage or Reiki Ryoho style,
while others are more open and inclusive.
Some arise in response to a specific need, or for a very specific purpose - only to
dissolve back into the electronic ether once more when that purpose has been
achieved.
Others, simply lose their dynamism, and are gradually abandoned to the
'tumbleweeds' - their one-time members having moved on to other, newly-discovered
and seemingly more vital, more relevant, manifestations of the online Reiki
community…
Certainly over the last decade, the number of Reiki fora has increased exponentially -
more recently it seems, there has been particular growth in Indonesian Reiki-fora - in
itself a clear indication of the recent surge of interest in the therapeutic discipline in
this part of the world.
For many practitioners, especially (though not solely) those for whom the journey
with Reiki has only recently begun, fora can play an important role.
They provide an all-important sense of community. They are a source of access to
the views and personal experience of others; a medium for eliciting feedback, help
and advice - essentially, they provide a support mechanism.
They offer the opportunity to participate in wide-ranging (and yes, often heated)
discussion on of all manner of Reiki-related topics.
They can be an effective tool for the exchange and dissemination a wide variety of
Reiki-related information; including up-to-the-minute news concerning events, offlinemeetings,
legal issues impacting on professional practice, etc, etc.
And many fora also function as 'distance' healing-lists, where practitioners and nonpractitioners
alike can come to request therapeutic intervention for themselves or
others.
Particularly for those who are practising Reiki Ryoho in places where they do not
have the opportunity of meeting 'hand to hand' with fellow practitioners, fora are
commonly the primary (and in some cases the only) medium of post-training contact
with like-minded souls.
Recognising this fact, several Reiki teachers do utilise private fora via which to keep
in touch with their own personal students - providing ongoing support, access to
updated teaching materials, etc, etc.
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
14
Of course, there are also many practitioners who perhaps have not managed, for
whatever reasons, to remain in communication with the individuals from whom they
have received Initiation.
Or alternatively, have simply never received any form of 'hand to hand' Initiation (- let
alone training) in the first place - having instead participated in online 'distance' Reiki
Initiation.
(A concept that is itself a topic of often heated debate on Reiki fora!)
Certainly, for people in this latter category, fora are in many cases their sole source
of training materials, and instruction in the practice of Reiki Ryoho.
Now while for many, the thinking is that we should use whatever means available to
'get Reiki out there' to as many people as possible, I personally feel that in attempting
to do so, we as teachers, must not lose sight of our Duty of Care to those who come
to us seeking Initiation
- a Duty of Care, irrespective of whether we provide this service with or without
charge.
It is perhaps all too easy for some to simply pass the 'attunement' element of the
Initiation and then leave the student to rely solely on 'virtual' sources for their training
instruction and informational resources.
Yet to my mind, such an approach cannot be viewed as a viable alternative to 'hand
to hand' training and development.
Of course, Reiki fora can also provide a very positive point of 'interactive first contact'
for many people seeking to venture into the world of Reiki Ryoho:
A place where people, drawn towards the possibility of integrating therapeutic and /
or spiritual elements of Reiki Ryoho into their lives, can visit and be made to feel
welcome.
Where they can ask their questions, get a 'feel' for things - and when they feel ready,
move forward to Initiation and well-presented formal training.
There are some very active fora where quite a high percentage of the membership is
made up of people who, although having previously been aware of Reiki Ryoho,
possibly would not have taken the life-changing step into initiation and training, had it
not been for the interaction with, and support provided by, the other members of
these online Reiki communities...
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
15
REIKI MYTHS...
Some commonly-held erroneous beliefs concerning the Art of Usui Reiki Ryoho
Copyright © 2007 James Deacon
MYTH: # "The majority of 'Japanese' Reiki styles are not based on Western
Reiki"
MYTH: # "Usui-sensei received the Reiki ability while performing something
called the 'Gumonji ho' (Morning Star Meditation) at Mt Kurama"
MYTH: # "Usui-sensei received the Reiki ability while performing something
called the 'Lotus Repentance' ritual at Mt Kurama"
MYTH: # "The Reiki Principles come originally from the Meiji Emperor"
MYTH: # "The Reiki symbols must be kept secret"
MYTH: # "The word Reiki means 'Universal Energy'"
MYTH: # "Reiki comes from Tibet (China/Egypt/Atlantis/Lemuria, etc)"
MYTH: # "Reiki is a Buddhist healing practice"
MYTH: # "Originally there were more than four Reiki symbols, but many have
been lost"
MYTH: # "Originally there were more than four Reiki symbols, but Mrs Takata
was only taught four - because she was only a woman, and technically
a foreigner"
MYTH: # "The Reiki symbols have no power of their own"
MYTH: # "Reiki knows where to go"
MYTH: # "The Reiki symbols are merely 'training wheels' - something to be, in
time, discarded"
MYTH: # "Reiki is a religion"
MYTH: # "Reiki was re-discovered in the 19thC"
MYTH: # "Reiki can do no harm"
MYTH: # "You don't need to be attuned ( / initiated) in order to use Usui Reiki
Ryoho"
MYTH: # "Jesus used Reiki to perform his healing miracles"
MYTH: # "Some new forms of Reiki are more powerful than Usui Reiki"
MYTH: # "Reiki energy flows in through the crown chakra and out through the
palm-chakras"
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
16
MYTH: # "The more powerful the Reiki, the more effectively it will heal "
MYTH: # "The symbols permit us to access different energies within the Reiki
energy itself"
MYTH: # "It is OK to send someone Reiki without their permission - just intend
that it works for their 'highest good'"
MYTH: # "A weekend seminar can make you a Reiki Master"
MYTH: # "Reiki is an 'intelligent energy' "
MYTH: # "Reiki was re-discovered in the 20thC"
MYTH: # "It doesn't matter if you're not really sure what your doing - it's your
intent that counts. If you make a mistake, your 'guides' will correct it"
MYTH: # "Mrs Takata made up the story about Dr.Usui being a Christian - to
make Reiki more acceptable to Americans"
MYTH: # "Mrs Takata started the practice of charging large fees for teaching
Reiki"
MYTH: # "Reiki will only be accepted if the individual's 'higher self' permits it"
MYTH: # "A Reiki Initiation is permanent - it can never be undone"
MYTH: # "The chakra-system was part of Usui-sensei's teachings"
* * * * * * *
_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
17
__________________________________________________
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_________________________________
James Deacon’s REIKI PAGES - w w w . a e t w . o r g
18
The contents of this E-book may be updated from time to time.
The availability of newer versions of this E-Book will be publicized on the
Free Reiki E-books page at: http://www.aetw.org
USE OF MATERIALS
You may freely publish the material contained in this e-book on your own website,
or in your Reiki Manuals*, newsletter*, or other 'not-for-profit'* publication
( - you may also translate it into other languages )
providing you publish it in its entirety
- including full Author and Copyright credits,
and:
If used on a website, you provide a live link back
[from the page where you place the material] to:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
If used in a manual*, newsletter*, or other printed medium*, you clearly credit:
JAMES DEACON'S REIKI PAGES: http://www.aetw.org
as the source of the material.
*There must be NO FINANCIAL GAIN from the use of this material.
If however, you do wish to include this material in a 'for-profit' publication,
you must seek and receive my express permission before doing so.
_______
If you simply wish to quote extracts from this material,
please make it obvious that they ARE extracts - i.e. use quotation marks
- and again clearly credit the source of the material.
Please do not use quotes out of context.
THANK YOU
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