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 Is Reiki Healing Legitimate?

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MessaggioOggetto: Is Reiki Healing Legitimate?   Gio 9 Lug 2009 - 11:41

It is hard to prove that Reiki exists, under contruction of confutability law of science.

People believe in reiki, and of course researches or writers have found a lot of reason for which reiki can works.

It would be interesting to find and group a series of essay about reiki, and how it is perceived from Occidental people, to compare with the original version of reiki, and its iconography.

This is an official invitation to each person, reiki one or not, that want contribute to create one of the first data data bank about reiki, and of course to developp a sereis of researches regarding history, iconography and compared study for the hundred different kind of "reiki" that historically and sociologically exists.


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FONTE: http://ezinearticles.com/?Is-Reiki-Healing-Legitimate?&id=688020

Is Reiki healing legitimate? The short answer is “yes”, if the practitioner has been trained in the art. Just as with any other type of therapy, the “therapist” can make all the difference. Here’s a little general information about Reiki and those who practice it.

Reiki is considered a form of “complementary” medicine. People who are seriously ill and have other treatment options should not choose Reiki instead of conventional treatment, but as a complementary or adjunctive therapy, it can be very helpful in many conditions.

Skeptics generally say that people who practice Reiki and other forms of non-conventional medicine are playing on the desperation of those who are seriously ill. But, no reputable therapist would advise patients to stop other forms of treatment, to stop seeing their doctors or to keep “secrets” from their doctors about what complementary treatments they are using. Whether it be Reiki, herbal remedies or any thing else, in order to receive the most effective treatment, patients need to be able to openly discuss all of their options with their doctors.

It is no surprise that people wonder is Reiki healing legitimate. At one time, the fundamentals of this type of medicine were kept secret. High fees were charged for training and for healing. The secrecy and fee structure alone were enough to draw criticism.

Reiki healers are sometimes compared to faith healers and most of us have heard the stories about faith healers like Peter Popoff, whose so-called miracles were proven to be fraudulent. But, Reiki is a legitimate form of energy medicine or “healing touch therapy”. It is not practiced by ministers or preachers, but by licensed massage therapists, nurses and anyone who is interested in learning to tap into the “universal life force”.

Reiki is actually more closely related to Ayurvedic and traditional Chinese medicine than to faith healing. Ayurvedic medicine is widely practiced throughout India and is recognized as a legitimate form of medicine. Traditional Chinese medicine, while considered a form of alternative medicine in the West, is an integral part of the health care system in China and Taiwan.

In the United States, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine is currently sponsoring scientific research to answer is Reiki healing legitimate, to learn how it may work and to identify conditions in which it may be most beneficial. With research of this nature, it is difficult to be sure that everything is conducted scientifically. In other words, it may be hard to “prove”. As yet, we have been unable to “prove” that the life energy or “Ki” that is used in Reiki healing exists, but maybe, with time.

Is Reiki healing legitimate? You can answer the question for yourself. Anyone can learn to use Reiki energy to improve their own health and well-being. Training is much less expensive than it was at one time and books that cover the basics are available on-line. To learn more, please visit Understanding Reiki.com.

Patsy Hamilton was a health care provider for over twenty years before becoming a health writer. Currently she is writing a series of articles about Reiki. Read more at http://understanding-reiki.com

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Patsy_Hamilton
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MessaggioOggetto: The Nature of the Reiki Experience   Gio 9 Lug 2009 - 11:52

FONTE: http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/9434/nature.html


The Nature of the Reiki Experience



From 'The Mystery and Meaning of Reiki'

A Thesis in progress by Darryl Harris. RN., Dip.App.Sc.(Nursing)., B.Hlth.Sc.(Nursing)., MCN(NSW)., MRCNA.

Despite the controversies surrounding the use of Reiki within mainstream health care, there still existsba conspicuous lack of understanding and knowledge of this healing art. Criticism of Reiki is often fuelled by citing the absence of research to support claims espousing the benefits of Reiki. (1,2,3) It is also important to note that the same critics often fail to acknowledge, albeit scarce, existing research. (4,5,6,7,8,9,10)

As Reiki practitioners we are being challenged to substantiate that which we know to be true, that Reiki has merit in healing the spirit, body and mind. I concur with Tattam (2) who stated that "... it is important to debate therapies such as Reiki, used in mainstream health care. (We believe orthodox treatments should also be open to the same sort of scrutiny). Anything that is used on patients or clients must be subject to review ...."

It is my contention that for Reiki to move into the health care arena we must embrace this challenge. We must produce reliable, accessible material that authenticate the claims, and we must create a forum for increased awareness and understanding. By illuminating the nature of the Reiki experience this research aims to address these issues.

German philosopher Martin Heidegger posited that as human beings we exist as participants in our world. We mould the world as we too are shaped by our experiences and our interactions. Our stories and our storytelling are the means by which we interact with, and make sense of, our world. In his seminal work, 'Being and Time' (11,12) Heidegger proposed a process for uncovering meanings which lay embedded in everyday experiences. It is this process I used to illuminate the nature of the Reiki experience.

Over the course of the study I met with five women whose experiences provided the primary focus of this thesis. Each conversation was taped, transcribed and analysed. As I read and listened to the conversations two prevailing themes emerged; Mystery and Meaning.

The first theme, Mystery, refers to the notion that there is a certain Mystery to Reiki. A sense that it cannot be understood, or known, in terms of words or language. What is experienced is a connection which transcends intellectualisation. It is known on an intuitive level. It is a sense of a connection with, or an awareness of, a divine entity. Through this connection a person being 'treated' is able to effect healing from within.

The second theme, Meaning, refers to the notion that despite the mystique Reiki has meaning to those who experience it. For some, Meaning comes in the form of relief from pain, which is to say that when they experience acute or chronic pain they have available to them a means by which they can act to relieve that pain. They feel a sense of empowerment, rather than feeling debilitated by their situation. Another Meaning relates to an emergence from emotional distress. Reiki becomes meaningful, in this instance, as away to encounter each day with a positive perspective, a away of taking control of one's own state of being. Meaning is also found in the synchronicity of life, that events occur not as a matter of random chance, rather one is led, or guided, to act in their life. Thus Reiki is experienced as a way of being-in-the-world with purpose and potential.

If we are to see Reiki become widely accepted within the mainstream healthcare system, efforts must be made to document its efficacy. The Mystery and Meaning of Reiki has shown that although the precise mechanism of Reiki is unknown it has positive effects on those that integrate it into their lives. Their experiences show that Reiki supports healing on an emotional, physical and spiritual level. Whilst further research is needed to expand on the phenomena unveiled in this study, it does lend support to the efficacy of Reiki as a complementary therapy.




References.

Anonymous. (1994, June). 'A warning about Reiki healing' [Letter to the editor]. Australian Nursing Journal. 1 (11), 4.
Tattam, A. (1994, August). 'Reiki - healing and dealing'. Australian Nursing Journal. 2 (2), 3,52.
Vega, M., Mitchell, S., Burns, L., Martinez, A. & Lewis, R. H. (1996). 'Reiki article draws praise, a request, and denunciation'. RN. 59 (7), July, 9 - 10.
Milton, G. & Chapman, E. (1995). 'The benefits of Reiki treatment in drug and alcohol rehabilitation programmes'. Conference Proceedings, 1995. Pathways to Healing: Enhancing Life through Complementary Therapies, September 24 - 25.
Canberra: Royal College of Nursing Australia.
Thornton, L. M. (1996a). 'A study of Reiki, an energy field treatment, using Rogers' Science'. Rogerian Nursing Science News. 8 (3), 14 - 15.
Thornton, L .M. (1996b). 'A study of Reiki using Rogers' science'. Rogerian Nursing Science News. 8 (4), 14 - 15.
Van Sell, S. L. (1996). 'Reiki: An ancient touch therapy'. RN. 59 (2), February, 57 - 59.
Wetzel, W. S. (1989). 'Reiki healing: A physiologic perspective'. Journal of Holistic Nursing. 7 (1), 47 - 54.
Wetzel, W. S. (1988). 'Reiki Healing: A Physiologic Perspective and Implication for Nursing'. Unpublished Masters Thesis. Sonoma State University: USA.
Wirth, D. P., Brenlan, D. R., Levine, R. J. & Rodriguez, C. M. (1993). 'The effect of complementary healing therapy on post operative pain after surgical removal of impacted third molar teeth'. Complementary Therapies in Medicine. 1, 133 - 138.
Heidegger, M. (1993). 'Being and Time'. (Macquarrie, J. & Robinson, E. trans.). Oxford: Blackwell.
Gelven, M. (1989). 'A Commentary on Heidegger's Being and Time'. (2cnd ed.). Illinois: Northern Illinois University Press.
Author's Note.

This article was originally published in 'Reiki Connexions: Newsletter for the Australasian Independent Reiki Practitioners' Association'. December 1997, 3 - 4.

The Thesis on which this article is based, The Mystery and Meaning of Reiki, was completed in 1998 and submitted to the School of Nursing and Health Studies, University of Western Sydney Nepean: Australia. It was awarded a Second Class Division One Honours.

It is my hope that if you have not yet, that you will be inspired by this work to seek out your own experience of Reiki. If you are a Reiki practitioner / master I hope you will continue your path with Reiki sharing its abundant universal love with all those you have contact with. I would also encourage any one who has a desire to do so, to take the opportunity to conduct your own research into the benefits and efficacy of Reiki as a valid tool in integrative medicine.

Questions, or comments, regarding this article, The Mystery and Meaning of Reiki, or researching Reiki can be directed to the author via email to stargazer17@hotmail.com

Peace Profound,

Darryl Harris
18 April, 1999.
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Is Reiki Healing Legitimate?   Gio 9 Lug 2009 - 12:02

FONTE: http://www.ncahf.org/articles/o-r/reiki.html

Reiki


William T. Jarvis, Ph.D.
The word, Reiki, is of Japanese origin. Rei means "universal spirit, unlimited," and ki refers to the "life force" or "energy." Proponents credit a Dr. Mikao Usui with "re-discovering" Reiki some time around 1846 as part of his search of "sacred texts."

It is clear from proponents' descriptions that Reiki is but a variation of other healing superstitions such as "pranic healing" (ritual of ancient fertility religion, Wicca [ie, witchcraft]), qigong (based upon traditional Chinese medicine), Therapeutic Touch (a pseudomedical practice done by 20th Century American nurses), and unnamed shamanic healing practices that involve hand-waving, or laying-on-of-hands, healing rituals. Such rituals are magical practices that purport to manipulate unseen "spiritual" forces.

First degree Reiki practitioners learn to treat through a series of 12 specific hand positions placed gently on the body. This allegedly facilitates the flow of Reiki energy through the practitioner, said to be manifested by a heightened feeling of warmth in the hands. The practitioner is said to merely serve as a conduit for the Reiki energy. A second degree Reiki practitioner allegedly "learns to send Reiki over distance through the use of special symbols which involve the opening up to the experience of the energy and listening to one's inner voice." The third level is Reiki Master, a process lasting a year or more while working as an apprentice with another Reiki Master. During this time the apprentice learns to embody the energy and is then able to teach Reiki to others." [1]

There is no evidence that clinical Reiki's effects are due to anything other than suggestion, or that they are superior to massage or any other healing ritual. Reiki's metaphysical beliefs may be in conflict with an individual patient's religious beliefs. Full disclosure of the belief system should precede its use in any setting. An investigation of proponent literature casts serious doubt as to whether Reiki practitioners can be trusted with such full disclosure. Reiki literature presents misinformation as fact, and instructs practitioners on how to skirt the law in order to protect themselves from regulation and accountability.

Reference
Bullock M. Reiki: a comprehensive therapy for life. American Journal of Hospice and Palliative Care 14:31-3, 1997.

Copyright Notice
© 1999 National Council Against Health Fraud. With proper citation, this article may be reproduced for noncommercial purposes
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Is Reiki Healing Legitimate?   Gio 9 Lug 2009 - 12:04

FONTE: http://skepdic.com/reiki.html


reiki


Reiki (pronounced ray-key) is a form of energy healing that centers on the manipulation of ki, the Japanese version of chi. Rei means spirit in Japanese, so reiki literally means spirit life force.

Like their counterparts in traditional Chinese medicine who use acupuncture, as well as their counterparts in the West who use therapeutic touch (TT), the practitioners of reiki believe that health and disease are a matter of the life force being disrupted. Belief in a life force, known as vitalism, was common in the West until the 19th century. Since then, the concept of life force has joined phlogiston, ether, and many other superannuated ideas on the rubbish heap of discarded scientific notions.

The belief in vitalism is still strong in China, India (where the life force is called prana), Africa (animism), and Japan Each believes that the universe is full of some sort of vital energy that cannot be detected by any scientific instruments, but which can be felt and controlled, often by special people who learn the tricks of the trade.

Reiki healers differ from acupuncturists in that they do not try to unblock a person's ki, but to channel the ki of the universe so that the client or patient heals. The channeling is done with the hands, and like TT no physical massaging is necessary since ki flows through the body of the healer into the patient. The reiki master claims to be able to draw upon the energy of the universe and increase his or her own energy while performing a healing. Reiki healers claim to channel ki into ill or injured individuals for "rebalancing." Depending on the training and beliefs of the healer, reiki is used to treat a wide array of ailments. Larry Arnold and Sandra Nevins claim in The Reiki Handbook (1992) that reiki is useful for treating brain damage, cancer, diabetes, and venereal diseases. Many reiki healers are more modest and treat lesser problems such as fatigue or muscle soreness. I was once treated by a reiki practitioner for a wrist injury. The treatment didn't work because I was a non-believer, or so I was told. If the healing fails—and it will inevitably fail for such things as cancer—it is because the patient is resisting the healing energy. Non-belief is one of the great blocks to healing energy. There is a reason for that, which we will explore below.

Reiki is popular among New Age spiritualists who are fond of "attunements," "harmonies," and "balances." I have read that Reiki apprentice healers used to pay up to $10,000 to their masters to become masters themselves. The price has come down and, according to one correspondent, "prices for first level are around $100, second level $150-300 and master around $600-800." Other practitioners claim to pass on their knowledge for nothing.

Reiki training involves going through several levels of attunement. One must learn which symbols to use, when to call up the universal life force, how to heal an emotional or spiritual illness, and how to heal someone who isn't present.

Reiki was popularized by Mikao Usui (1865-1926). After fasting and meditating for several weeks, he began hallucinating and hearing voices giving him "the keys to healing."

Does it work? Yes. Reiki works as well as any other placebo medicine. It works primarily by the power of suggestion and classical conditioning, both of which can bring about physiological changes in the believer or the open-minded skeptic who knows little about placebo energy medicine. Reiki, however, will have no effect on someone who thinks the reiki ritual is superstitious showmanship. My reiki healer vigorously rubbed his hands across his pants before waving them over my wrist. He seems to have produced some heat and some static electricity, which I could feel when he got close to my skin. (As noted above, the healer doesn't actually touch the patient.) There are many kinds of reiki practitioners, just as there are many kinds of acupuncture. All, however, claim to be manipulating ki to assist in healing. The evidence for the existence of ki is the same as the evidence for suggestion and conditioning. Applying Occam's razor, we find no need for ki to explain how reiki works.

Is reiki or any other energy healing dangerous? The practices are not inherently dangerous, but they could be deadly to patients who try to treat something like diabetes or cancer by having someone wave her hands in the air over parts of the body or stick needles in the neck or thigh. Read, for example, the tragic story of Debra Harrison, a diabetic and co-founder of a type of energy healing called Consegrity, who was in effect killed by her own medicine.

One of the great promoters of energy medicine, Oprah Winfrey, often features Dr. Mehmet Oz on her television program. Oz is married to a reiki practitioner.

See also aura therapy, chakra, ch'i kung (qi gong), crystal power, e-meter, Kirlian photography, magical thinking, orgone energy, Q-Ray, Q-Link, radionics, sham acupuncture (for a breakdown of the differences between placebo and false placebo effects), the New Age page of links and "Energy Healing: Looking in All the Wrong Places."
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Is Reiki Healing Legitimate?   Lun 12 Ott 2009 - 16:01

FONTE: http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/mar/31/us-catholic-bishops-reiki

Catholic bishops in US ban Japanese reiki


Reiki, an alternative Japanese therapy with a growing band of followers in the west, is "unscientific" and "inappropriate" for use in Catholic institutions, according to America's bishops.
Guidelines issued by the committee on doctrine at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops warn healthcare workers and chaplains that the therapy "lacks scientific credibility" and could expose people to "malevolent forces".
The document also claims that for a Catholic to believe in reiki presents "insurmountable problems".
Reiki means "universal life energy" and was developed by the theology professor Dr Mikao Usui at the turn of the 20th century, from Buddhist beliefs and Sanskrit teachings. The client lies on a couch, clothed and relaxing, while the therapist's hands rest lightly on the body in a special sequence. Clients often report heat and tingling sensations.
The church's guidelines state: "A Catholic who puts his or her trust in reiki would be operating in the realm of superstition, the no man's land that is neither faith nor science. Superstition corrupts one's worship of God by turning one's religious feeling and practice in a false direction."
The document goes on to state that since reiki therapy is incompatible with Christian teaching and scientific evidence, "it would be inappropriate" for Catholic institutions, such as healthcare facilities and retreat centres, or people representing the church, such as chaplains, to promote or provide support for it.
Reiki master Judith White, who is a Christian, said the bishops had misunderstood the therapy. "There is so much bad information about reiki, anti-Christian information, on the internet," she said. "It says we channel spirits and that's not true. Reiki balances energy in the same way as acupuncture or reflexology. I know of two nuns in the Philadelphia area, one who runs a retreat centre, who have done wonderful work. The bishops weren't talking to women like that."
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