Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico
Nei momenti più bui, ricorda sempre di fare un passo alla volta.
Voler ottenere tutto e subito è sciocco
Nei momenti più difficili, ricorda sempre che le abitudini stabiliscono un destino.
Stabilisci quelle che ti danno energia e crescita.
È solo nell’ora più profonda del Duat, nella Notte oscura dell’anima che possiamo vedere noi stessi.
E capire come superare la notte.
Non rifuggire l’oscurità, impara a vederci attraverso.
Tutto passa e scorre, il giorno diviene notte e la notte giorno.
Ciò che è bene per te ora domani diverrà un ostacolo e un impedimento, o un danno, e viceversa.
Tutto finisce e muta, come la pelle di un serpente.
Impara ad essere la volontà pura di vivere e non la pelle morta di un intento esaurito.
Tutto ciò che non supera l’alba del tuo nuovo giorno, non deve essere portato con te.
Il mondo è infinito, non giudicare perdite e guadagni come il piccolo pescatore che non ha mai visto l’Oceano.
Sconfinate sono le possibilità della Ruota.
Impara a fluire e solo allora senza occhi, senza orecchie né pensiero, vedrai, sentirai e capirai il Tao.
(Admin - Shamanism & Co. © 2011 - All rights reserved)


Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico

forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia, spirito critico, terapie alternative, esoterismo. Forum of shamanism, anthropology, criticism, alternative therapies and esoterism
 
IndicePortaleFAQCercaRegistrarsiAccedi

Condividere | 
 

 Gli otto immortali

Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Andare in basso 
AutoreMessaggio
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Gli otto immortali   Mer 4 Ago 2010 - 11:18

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eight_Immortals


Gli otto immortali.

LA leggenda di coloro che attraversarono la soglia.





Eight Immortals

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia



The Eight Immortals (Chinese: 八仙; pinyin: Bāxiān; Wade-Giles: Pa-hsien) are a group of legendary xian ("immortals; transcendents; fairies") in Chinese mythology. Each Immortal's power can be transferred to a power tool (法器) that can give life or destroy evil. Together, these eight tools are called "Covert Eight Immortals" (暗八仙 àn ~). Most of them are said to have been born in the Tang Dynasty or Song Dynasty. They are revered by the Taoists, and are also a popular element in the secular Chinese culture. They are said to live on a group of five islands in the Bohai Sea which includes Penglai Mountain-Island.
The Immortals are:

• Immortal Woman He (He Xiangu),
• Royal Uncle Cao (Cao Guojiu),
• Iron-Crutch Li (Tieguai Li),
• Lan Caihe,
• Lü Dongbin, (leader)
• Philosopher Han Xiang (Han Xiang Zi),
• Elder Zhang Guo (Zhang Guo Lao), and
• Han Zhongli.


For their names in Chinese characters and Wade-Giles, see the individual pages in the list above.
In literature before the 1970s, they were sometimes translated as the Eight Genies. First described in the Yuan Dynasty, they were probably named after the Eight Immortal Scholars of the Han.
Contents

• 1 In art
• 2 In literature
• 3 In Qigong and Chinese Martial Arts
• 4 Reverence
• 5 Modern depictions
• 6 See also
• 7 References
• 8 Further reading
• 9 External links


In art


The tradition of depicting humans who have become immortals is an ancient practice in Chinese art, and when religious Taoism gained popularity, it quickly picked up this tradition with its own immortals[citation needed]. While cults dedicated to various Taoist immortals date back to the Han dynasty, the popular and well known Eight Immortals first appeared in the Jin dynasty (金朝). The art of the Jin tombs of the 12th and 13th centuries depict a group of eight Taoist immortals in wall murals and sculptures. They officially became known as the Eight Immortals in the writings and works of art of the Taoist sect known as the Complete Realization (Quanshen). The most famous art depiction of the Eight Immortals from this period is a mural of them in the Eternal Joy Temple (Yongle Gong) at Ruicheng.
The Eight Immortals are considered to be signs of prosperity and longevity, so they are popular themes in ancient art. They were frequent adornments on celadon vases. They were also common in sculptures owned by the nobility. Their most common appearance, however, was in paintings[citation needed]. Many silk paintings, wall murals, and wood block prints remain of the eight immortals. They were often depicted either together in one group, or alone to give more homage to that specific immortal.
An interesting feature of early Eight Immortal artwork is that they are often accompanied by jade hand maidens, commonly depicted servants of the higher ranked deities, or other images showing great spiritual power. This shows that early on the Eight Immortals quickly became eminent figures of the Taoist religion, and had great importance[citation needed]. We can see this importance is only heightened in the Ming dynasty and Qing dynasties. During these dynasties, the Eight Immortals are very frequently associated with other prominent spiritual deities in artwork. There are numerous paintings with them and the Three Stars (the gods of longevity, emolument, and good fortune) together. Also, other deities of importance, such as the Queen Mother of the West, are commonly seen in the company of the Eight Immortals.
The artwork of the Eight Immortals isn’t limited to paintings or other visual arts. They are quite prominent in written works too. Authors and playwrights wrote numerous stories and plays on the Eight Immortals. One famous story that has been rewritten many times and turned into several plays (the most famous written by Mu Zhiyuan in the Yuan dynasty) is The Yellow-Millet Dream, which is the story of how Lǚ Dòngbīn met Zhongli Quan and began his path to immortality.[1]


In literature



The Eight Immortals crossing the sea, from Myths and Legends of China, 1922 by E. T. C. Werner. Clockwise in the boat starting from the stern: He Xiangu, Han Xiang Zi, Lan Caihe, Li Tieguai, Lü Dongbin, Zhongli Quan, Cao Guojiu and outside the boat is Zhang Guo Lao.
The Immortals are the subject of many artistic creations, like paintings and sculptures. Examples of writings about them include:
• The Yueyang Mansion (《岳陽樓》 yuè yáng lòu) by Ma Zhiyuan (馬致遠 mǎ zhì yuǎn),
• The Bamboo-leaved Boat (《竹葉船》 zhú yè chuán) by Fan Zi'an (范子安 fàn zǐ ān), and
• The Willow in the South of the City (《城南柳》 chéng nán liǔ) by Gu Zijing (谷子敬 gǔ zǐ jìng).
• The most significant of the writings is The Eight Immortals Depart and Travel to the East (《八仙出處東游記》 bā xiān chū chù dōng yoú jì) by Wu Yuantai (吳元泰 wú yuán taì) in Ming Dynasty.
• There is another work in Ming, by an anonymous writer, called The Eight Immortals Cross the Sea (《八仙過海》 bā xiān guò hǎi). It is about the Immortals on their way to attend the Conference of the Magical Peach (蟠桃會 pán taó huì) and encountered an ocean. Instead of going across by their clouds, Lü Dongbin suggested that together, they should use their powers to get across. Stemming from this, the Chinese proverb "The Eight Immortals cross the sea, each reveals its divine power" (八仙過海,各顯神通 ~, gè xiǎn shén tōng) indicates the situation that everybody shows off their powers to achieve a common goal.
In Qigong and Chinese Martial Arts
The Eight Immortals have been linked to the initial development of qigong exercises such as the Eight Piece Brocade. [2] There are some Chinese Martial Arts styles named after the Eight Immortals which uses fighting techniques that are attributed to the characteristics of each immortal. [3]


Reverence

Established in the Song Dynasty, the Xi'an temple Eight Immortals Palace (八仙宮), formerly Eight Immortals Nunnery (八仙庵), where statues of the Immortals can be found in the Hall of Eight Immortals (八仙殿). In Mu-cha (木柵 mù zhà), Taipei City, Taiwan, there is a temple called South Palace (南宮), nicknamed Eight Immortal Temple (八仙廟 ~ miào). And in Singapore, there is a temple called Xian Gu Tian (仙姑殿) worshiping the Eight Immortals with the main deity He Xian Gu.

Modern depictions


In modern China, the Eight Immortals are still a popular theme in artwork. Paintings, pottery, and statues of the Eight Immortals are still common in households across China, and are even gaining some popularity world wide.
Several movies about the Eight Immortals have been produced in China in recent years.
In Jackie Chan's movie "Drunken Master", there were eight "drunken" Kung Fu forms that were said to be originated from the Eight Immortals. At first the protagonist didn't want to learn the Immortal Woman He form because he saw it as a feminine form but eventually created his own version of that form.
The Eight Immortals play an important part in the plot of the video game Fear Effect 2.
In the Andy Seto graphic novel series "Saint Legend", the Eight Immortals reappear to protect the Buddhist faith from evil spirits set on destroying it.
In the X-Men comic book, the Eight Immortals appear to protect China along with the Collective Man, when the mutant Xorn caused a massacre in one small village.
The Eight Immortals played a role in the animated show Jackie Chan Adventures.
Also in the book: "Cathy's Book" by Sean Stewart and Jordan Weisman
In The Forbidden Kingdom, Jackie Chan plays the character Lu Yun, who is one of the eight immortals. This was revealed by the director in the movie's special feature, The Monkey King and The Eight Immortals.


See also


• Ashtamangala
References
1. ^ Stephen Little: "Taoism and the Arts of China", page 313, 319-334. The Art Institute of Chicago, 200
2. ^ Olson, Stuart Alve (2002). Qigong Teachings of a Taoist Immortal: The Eight Essential Exercises of Master Li Ching-Yun. Bear & Company. ISBN 0892819456.
3. ^ Leung, TingAlve (July 2000). The Drunkard Kung Fu and Its Application. Leung Ting Co. ISBN 9627284084.






FONTE: http://qi-journal.com/philosophy.asp?-Token.FindPage=1&-Token.SearchID=Immortals

Daoist (Taoist) immortals are considered "patron saints" of the Daoist belief. Images of them can be found in porcelain, wood, ivory and metal reproductions as well as in paintings. They were representative of typical individuals and represented wealth and poverty, old age and youth, male and female. The Chinese believed that average human beings could, through hard study, learn the secrets of nature and become immortal. These immortals were idolized and respected for their wisdom, humor, and moral lessons and became legends that almost everyone common person was intimently aware of. Normally, only eight immortals are officially recognized, but legends describe several more, some of which we have described below.

Cao Guo Jiu
His name is Jiu and his surname is Cao. He was born in the Sung dynasty, son of a military commander and was an uncle of the emperor. Fearing that he might be involved in trouble caused by his brother's ill behavior, he went to the mountains to learn the doctrines of Daoism. Afterwards, led by Hang Zhong Li and Lu Dong Bin, he joined the society of the celestial beings. He wears an official court headdress and carries a pair of castanets as his trademark symbol. He is considered the "patron saint" of the theatre.

He Xian Gu
She was a native of Guangzhou (Canton) in the Tang dynasty, where she lived near the Yun Mu River. When she was fourteen to fifteen years old, she became a celestial being as a result of taking the Daoist medicine of mother-of-pearl powder. She disappeared one day when on her way to the court of the Empress Wu (AD 690-705) who had sent for her. She was revered for the long distances she travelled to pick dainty bamboo shoots for her mother who as very ill. Some say that she was a Daoist Nun during the Sung dynasty. Literates and officials often make inquiries of her on their future and destiny. She carries a lotus flower or seed pod as her trademark.

Lan Cai He
His name was first mentioned in Shen Fen's "The Celestial Being's Biographies, The Sequel" of the Tang dynasty. He often wears worn-out clothing. He usually holds a bamboo clapper and acts as though he is a common begger. For a living, he often begs for handouts in the busiest areas of the town, singing loudly while as if intoxicated. He was considered "semi-crazed by many. He travels far and wide with great ease. His trademark is a bamboo basket as he is considered the "patron saint" of gardeners.
Han Xiang
It is said that Han Xiang Zi was a nephew of Han Yu. He has a bright and unrestrained disposition. He was carried by his teacher and master to the magic peach tree, where grew the immortal peaches... there an accident occurred (he fell from the branches), and he became an immortal. Once, in early winter, he made the peony flowers blossom in different colors, all within a few days...and inside each of the blossoms was a small poem. His uncle Han Yu was amazed and surprised at this skill level. He is usually pictured carrying a flute and is considered the "patron saint" of musicians.

Zhang Guo Lao
Zhang Guo Lao lives in seclusion on mount Zhong Tiao. During the Tang Dynasty, he was already reported to be over 200 hundred years old. Once, Empress Wu Zhe Tiang dispatched officers to call upon him and bring him back for questioning, but he pretended to be dead...afterwards, some people met him walking around Mount Heng. He was invited by Xuan Zong, the Emperor of the Tang Dynasty, to demonstrate his magic arts (he was a famous magician of the 7th and 8th centuries). He typically is pictured riding a white donkey with his back forward. The donkey is capable of running thousands of miles each day. According to lengend, when he needs to rest, he folds up the white donkey and hides it in a small box. He usually carries a musicial instrument, a bamboo tube beaten by two rods which are carries inside the tube.

Lu Dong Bing
Also called Lu Yan (Chun Yang Zi is another alias). He was a native of Zhong Fu during the Tang Dynasty. When he was young, he tried twice but could not pass the highest imperial examination. When he was sixty-four years old, he met Han Zhong Li, who gave him a lesson in the magic arts. He now lives in Mount Zhong Lan to cultivate himself according to the religious doctrines of Daoism. He named himself Hui Dao Ren. It is said that he once beheaded a flood dragon. He often plays with a crane in Yue Yang City, and drinks copious amounts of wine. He was granted a magic sword as a reward for overcoming ten temptations. This sword is his trademark and he is usually pictured with it and uses it to combat various evils on earth.

Han Zhong Li
Zhong Li is his last name and Quan is his first name. Tie Guai Li helped him learn the religious doctrine of Daoism in the mountains. After finishing his Daoist studies, he went back to the earthly society. He beheaded a tiger with a flying sword and touched a stone and turned it into gold... giving the wealth to the poor. He left the earth for the heaven with his brother. He also helped Lu Dong Bin achieve immortal status. It is said that he lived several hundred yuears before the Christian eara, and is said to be able to revive the souls of the dead with his magic fan, which is his trademark.

Tie Gwai Li

According to legends, his original name is Li Xuang. He met Tai Shang Lao Jun and became a celestrial being. Legends state that he was a personal friend of Lao Tzu, the famous philosopher. When his spirit went adventuring, his body was left in the care of a disciple. On one occasion, the disciple was called away, and when Tie Gwai Li returned, his body had disappeared. He then took possession of the body of a dying beggar, and in such, is always portrayed supported by a crutch and a pilgrim's gourd as his trademark items. He is lame, so he sprinkles water on a bamboo cane and turns it into a iron walking stick. He is also called Tei Guai Li because his surname is connected with "Tie Guai" which means "iron walking stick".

Mang Mu Nian Niang

Also named Xi Wang Mu, Jing Mu, or Xi Lao. According to the "Biography of Emperor Mu Tien Zi", she is a fair and gentle elderly woman with a gift of singing. But according to the "Biography of Emperor Han Mu Ti:", she is about thirty-years old and an exceedingly beautiful goddess. She bestowed the flat peaches, which blossom once every three thousand years, on Emperor Han Wu Ti. When the flat peaches bear fruits, she always entertains the celestial beings with them in celebration of her birthday.

Shou Xin

In Chinese, "Shou Xin" means "Star of Longevity". He is both an immortal and a powerful symbol of long life. His portrait is often displayed during one's birthday for good luck. He is perhaps the most recognized of the immortals because his likeness is used for so many purposes. You can find statues of him and his wife in gift stores around the world and pictures of him appear on posters, gift wrapping, and gift cards.









FONTE: http://www.tuttocina.it/Tuttocina/Simbologia/otto_imm.htm

GLI OTTO IMMORTALI


È nel XII secolo, durante la dinastia Jin, che si assiste alla formazione, in Cina, a partire da elementi disparati, della pleiade degli inseparabili Otto Immortali (Baxian 1 ), che sono stati raggruppati e associati per misteriose ragioni, e situati al centro del pantheon taoista, senza dubbio per rispondere e fare da contrappunto, in una certa misura, al famoso gruppo dei diciotto luohan 2 (o arhat) del buddhismo.

Tre di questi immortali sarebbero personaggi storici, mentre gli altri sono puramente leggendari e nati dall'immaginazione popolare; tra loro citiamo una donna e un personaggio androgino, piuttosto equivoco. Si possono associate o contrapporre in veri e propri binomi: l'aristocratico - il proletario; il ricco - il povero; il giovane - il vecchio; l’uomo - la donna... in loro si vede la rappresentazione di una diversa condizione: l'alto funzionario, il soldato, il vecchio, il ricco... Quest'ottetto dai poteri straordinari, in Cina ha sempre suscitato una passione continua, soprattutto tra gli strati popolari. Indubbiamente è stata la particolare conoscenza dei segreti della natura, che ha consentito loro di diventare immortali.

In particolare il loro gruppo simboleggia la felicità secondo i principi taoisti; e ci sono moltissime rappresentazioni che li raffigurano. Hanno fornito, per secoli, molteplici temi a tutti gli artisti e artigiani. Uno dei più frequenti li mostra nella “Traversata dei Mari”. Un giorno decisero di recarsi ad ammirare le meraviglie del mare, ma la divinità Lu Yuan pretese che rinunciassero al loro abituale veicolo-cavalcatura: una comoda nuvoletta. Dovettero camminare sul mare, ognuno con l'aiuto di un oggetto magico, il suo attributo, come vedremo; per uno il bastone, per un altro la spada, per il terzo il ventaglio, ecc. Strada facendo entrarono in conflitto con un re-drago, a cui inflissero una cocente sconfitta. Le loro peregrinazioni marittime poterono quindi proseguire attraverso mille altre avventure. D'altronde, tra le vane facoltà! - avevano quella di poter diventare visibili o invisibili a piacimento, resuscitare i morti, trasformare in oro tutto quel che toccavano per mezzo di una meravigliosa pietra magica...

Spesso vengono anche rappresentati mentre avanzano in gruppo lungo i sentieri tortuosi della montagna della Longevità, o nel paradiso taoista, un paesaggio boscoso, disseminato di stagni e di torrenti ingombri di rocce. Raggiunto un alto grado di poteri magici, questi personaggi, generalmente solitari, dovevano incontrarsi una volta l’anno nelle montagne della catena Kunlun Shan, tra il Tibet e il Turkestan, luogo di residenza di Xi Wang Mu, la “Dama-Regina dell'Ovest”, importante divinità dell'Olimpo cinese. Questa fata taoista, detta “Madre d'oro”, presiedeva al loro incontro in mezzo a fiori di corallo e ad altri splendori, come pesche dell’immortalità, che maturano soltanto ogni 3.000 anni! Nell'iconografia, Xi Wang Mu talvolta è rappresentata seduta su una grande gru celeste, altra tradizionale cavalcatura degli Immortali, nonché simbolo di vita eterna.

1) Zhongli Quan 3

Posto alla loro testa, ne è il capo. Obeso, grasso, la pancia per aria, barbuto, con due piccoli chignon rotondi sulle tempie, ha come attributo principale un ventaglio che gli serve per cacciare le creature malefiche e anche per risvegliare l'anima dei defunti, proprio come Iside rese il soffio vitale a Osiride morto, creando un vento agitando le ali. Zhongli Quan nell’altra mano ha anche la pesca dell'immortalità o il fungo magico della longevità, oppure anche il frutto che viene detto “mano di Budda”, il Citrus digitata, simbolo di prosperità.

Nato nello Shanxi prima della venuta di Cristo, sembra che Zhongli Quan sia stato maresciallo e, diventato vecchio, sia andato a vivere da eremita nei monti Yang Jiao. Ma esistono diverse versioni riguardanti questo personaggio, che forse è di origine storica. Sembra che fosse in grado di tramutare il rame in argento per mezzo di una droga; distribuiva poi ai poveri il suo metallo prezioso. Un bel giorno una gru celeste lo trasportò nel paradiso dell'immortalità.

2) Lü Dongbin 4

Questo secondo immortale rivaleggia in celebrità con il primo. Si riconosce per il suo berretto taoista, detto berretto del “Maestro (o Patriarca) Lü”, ma anche per lo scacciamosche “Scopa per le nuvole”, e per la spada miracolosa, che porta applicata sulla schiena, e sulla quale poteva salire in piedi e attraversare fiumi e nubi, senza affondare, né cadere. Ma gli serviva, più “naturalmente”, a decapitare i geni malvagi e i mostri di qualsiasi genere.

Secondo la leggenda, sarebbe nato nel 755 d.C. a Yongle, nello Shanxi (città che oggi è celebre per il tempio e i dipinti dell'epoca Yuan) e sarebbe vissuto per 400 anni. La spada magica gli fu donata sul monte Lushan, quando aveva vent’anni, da un drago di fuoco. A cinquant'anni, gli fu confidato da Zhongli Quan il segreto dell'immortalità, insieme all’arte della trasformazione alchimistica che desiderava ardentemente propagare tra gli uomini. Fu dotato di questi poteri e armi magiche dopo aver trionfato nel superamento della prova delle “Dieci tentazioni”. Durante i secoli che trascorse sulla terra, portò a termine innumerevoli imprese meravigliose in tutto l'Impero, uccidendo draghi, liberando il nostro mondo da moltissime calamità. Varie leggende ne raccontano le imprese e le gesta. Nel 1115, l’imperatore Huizong gli conferì il titolo di “Eroe dalla meravigliosa saggezza”. Il soprannome Dong Bin, “Ospite della grotta”, gli deriva dal luogo nascosto e solitario dove amava ritirarsi. È onorato dai letterati per le doti di scrittore che inoltre possedeva, ed è il patrono dei fabbricanti di inchiostro, ma anche quello dei malati e dei barbieri! Particolare strano: su alcune di queste rappresentazioni è vestito con un abito che è un vero e proprio patchwork.

3) Li Tieguai 5 (o "Li stampella di ferro")

Ha l'aspetto di un mendicante cencioso e zoppo con in mano una fiaschetta da pellegrino contenente i suoi medicinali magici e, nell'altra, un bastone di ferro a cui si appoggia. Ha un'aria poco invitante e dalla sua zucca escono turbinando misteriosi vapori. Un tempo la sua immagine era l'emblema delle farmacie. Fu Xi Wang Mu, la "Dama‑Regina dell'ovest", già citata, a rivelargli l'arte di diventare immortale. Talvolta è rappresentato in piedi su un granchio o in compagnia di un cervo o di un daino. La gruccia di ferro gli venne offerta da Laozi per sostituire la gamba paralizzata.

Nel corso delle sue peregrinazioni sulla terra, si dice che sospendesse la propria borraccia a una fessura della parete della propria stanza, e dopo essersi magicamente rimpicciolito fino a raggiungere le dimensioni di una rana, la notte vi si rifugiasse all'interno, per dormire. Il giorno dopo ne usciva, ritornando per incanto alle normali dimensioni. Il suo spirito vitale poteva abbandonare a piacimento gli stracci carnali e assumere una natura eterea e informe. Talvolta si osservano i cinque pipistrelli simboleggianti le “cinque felicità” che volteggiano intorno a fumigazioni medicinali emananti dalla sua zucca.

Il suo brutto aspetto è spiegato da un episodio leggendario. Un tempo, Li Tieguai fu convocato da Laozi nei monti della Longevità. Al momento della partenza, Li affidò provvisoriamente al suo discepolo il proprio involucro carnale, chiedendogli di cremarlo soltanto se non fosse stato di ritorno entro sette giorni. Ma accadde che il sesto giorno il discepolo venne a sapere che sua madre era in fin di vita. Senza aspettare bruciò il corpo del padrone e partì per recarsi al capezzale della moribonda. Ma il giorno dopo l'anima di Li Tieguai era di ritorno; cercò invano il proprio corpo e al suo posto trovò soltanto un mucchietto di ceneri. L'anima, disperata, partì allora alla ricerca di un altro corpo in cui alloggiare e, in un bosco, trovò soltanto il cadavere di un mendicante zoppo e orrendo, morto di fame. In mancanza di meglio l'anima vi si rifugiò, e da quel giorno Li Tieguai, suo malgrado, si trovò in questo corpo d’invalido, piuttosto sgradevole.
Per mitigare le sue sfortune, Laozi gli regalò una gruccia di ferro, da cui deriva il suo soprannome, “Li stampella di ferro!”.

4) Zhang Guolao 6

Altro personaggio storico, Zhang Guolao sarebbe vissuto nell’VIII secolo; simboleggia la vecchiaia. Famoso eremita delle montagne dello Shanxi, declinava regolarmente gli inviti che gli venivano fatti per recarsi a Corte, e morì improvvisamente il giorno in cui alla fine accettò. Tra i poteri magici, aveva quello di diventare invisibile o di bere senza battere ciglio tazze di fortissimi veleni. È raffigurato come un vecchio barbuto, dallo sguardo vivace, talvolta con in testa un berretto da letterato, ornato di una piuma di fenice. Porta sempre sulla schiena un bambù cavo da cui escono due bacchette piegate (uno strumento musicale a percussione). Viaggiava su una infaticabile mula bianca, capace di percorrere quotidianamente centinaia di leghe. Zhang è raffigurato sia seduto normalmente sul dorso della mula, sia seduto alla rovescia, voltato dalla parte della coda! Venuta la notte, appiattiva la sua mula come un foglio di carta, la piegava in quattro o in otto parti e la metteva al riparo nella sua borsa o nella scatola per i fazzoletti, che talvolta gli si vede tenere in mano. La mattina sputava sulla carta e la inumidiva, poirestituiva alla mula le sue forme animali naturali. Ed entrambi riprendevano il cammino. Nell’iconografia popolare, come nel caso della cicogna anglosassone, talvolta si vede il nostro Immortale portare un neonato a giovani donne sposate. Un’altra immagine talvolta lo mostra in piedi su un rospo gigante.

5) Han Xiangzi 7

Incarna la giovinezza e sembra sia vissuto all’inizio del IX secolo. È il patrono dei musicisti e spesso viene raffigurato mentre suona il ftauto silvestre o il flauto traverso. Era l’allievo preferito del nostro secondo Immortale, Lü Dongbin, che lo condusse a far visita al pescatore soprannaturale e meraviglioso; ma Han cadde dall’albero e, in quell’attimo, divenne immortale. Era solito vagabondare in mezzo alla natura. incantando gli uccelli e perfino gli animali selvatici per mezzo del suo flauto. Aveva anche il potere di far crescere istantaneamente piante meravigliose in una semplice manciata di terra. Infine non aveva la minima idea del valore del denaro, e lo disperdeva ai quattro venti!

6) Cao Guojiu 8

Con in testa il potéou o pettinatura deí mandarini, con un corno dietro e alette laterali, Cao è il patrono degli attori e di tutti coloro che esercitano la professione teatrale. Ha in mano delle nacchere (il suo attributo principale), ma talvolta anche uno scacciamosche. Prima di ritirarsi tra i monti, sembra che sia stato ministro della dinastia Song: era inoltre legato alla famiglia imperiale (XI secolo), come fratello dell’imperatrice Cao Hu. Può anche venir rappresentato vestito sfarzosamente con la doppia cintura degli “habitué” della corte imperiale. Talvolta ha anche in mano la sua tavoletta di ammissione alla Corte. Fu scelto e reso immortale dagli altri Sette che occupavano sette delle otto grotte della Sfere Superiori, ed erano alla ricerca di un ottavo compagno meritevole. Era fuggito e diventato eremita per evitare la vergogna di avere un fratello assassino. Si copriva la testa ai piedi della piante selvatiche. I due primi Immortali che incontrò gli proposero ben presto di accoglierlo nella loro cerchía e gli comunicarono la ricetta dell'immortalità. Poco dopo fu cooptato da tutti gli altri Immortali.

7) Lan Caihe 9

È l’ermafrodita, il saltimbanco che generalmente suona il flauto o i piatti; più spesso viene considerato per il suo aspetto femminile. Nell’altro aspetto, maschile, appare come un vecchio cencioso, a piedi scalzi, appoggiato a un bastone, nell’atto di mendicare. Talvolta brandisce un piccolo sarchio. Rappresenta il massimo dell’originalità: d’inverno dormiva nudo, e d’estate si copriva di pellicce! Patrono dei fioristi, Lan Caihe è rappresentato con un abito blu, con un cesto di fiori al braccio; talvolta è scortato da un daino che ha in bocca un fungo sacro. Un giorno la nostra cantante ambulante fu trovata ubriaca ín una locanda e subito, per la stizza, si eclissò su una nuvola, dopo essersi completamente denudata.

Cool He Xiangu 10

Sebbene venga presentata come la figlia di un bottegaio dello Hunan che visse ai tempi della terribile imperatrice Wu Zetian (690-705), la vergine immortale He Xiangu ha l'aspetto di una fata; volteggiava da una cima all’altra nei Monti di Nacre, nutrendo sua madre con i frutti che raccoglieva. Lei poteva fare a meno di mangiare, o si accontentava di una polvere di madreperla o di perle, oppure anche di raggi di luna che rendevano il suo corpo evanescente ed eterno. Nacque con sei capelli in testa e non ne ebbe mai di più! Scomparve e divenne immortale mentre si recava dall’imperatrice Wu Zetian che l’aveva convocata.
È rappresentata come una graziosa ragazza, che porta su una spalla un lungo gambo di loto curvilineo, terminante con un fiore o con una capsula di semi. Questo stelo di loto magico serviva all’"apertura del cuore”. Talvolta ha uno scettro ruyi 11, o suona l’organo a bocca (sheng 12 ), o beve, oppure ha in mano uno scacciamosche, o anche la pesca dell'immortalità. Può essere anche vestita di foglie. È la fata che veglia sui focolari domestici.



Ultima modifica di Admin il Lun 23 Ago 2010 - 6:15, modificato 6 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Mer 4 Ago 2010 - 11:20



FONTE immagine: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/He%20Xiangu.jpg


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Immortal_Woman_He


Immortal Woman He

Named Hé Qióng (何瓊 Hé Qióng), Immortal Woman He or He Xiangu (何仙姑 Hé Xiān Gū in pinyin or Ho Hsien-ku in Wade-Giles) is the only female deity among the Eight Immortals. (The gender of her fellow Immortal Lán Cǎihé is somewhat ambiguous).
She was from Yong Prefecture (永州 Yǒngzhōu) (today Linglin County (零陵縣 Líng Lín Xiàn), Hunan) in Tang Dynasty, or from a wealthy and generous family in Zēngchéng County (增城縣), Guangdong.


Legend


Hé Xiān Gū was the daughter of Ho T‘ai, of the town of Tsêng-ch‘êng, in the prefecture of Guangdong
At birth she had six long hairs on the crown of her head. When she was about 14 or 15, a divine personage appeared to her in a dream and instructed her to eat powdered mica, in order that her body might become etherealized and immune from death. So she swallowed it, and also vowed to remain a virgin.
Later on by slow degrees she gave up taking ordinary food.

The Empress Wu dispatched a messenger to summon her to attend at the palace, but on the way there, she disappeared.
One day during the Jīng Lóng (景龍) period (about 707 CE), she ascended to Heaven in broad daylight, and became a Hsien (Taoist Immortal).
From Lieh Hsien Chuan, ii, 32, 33

Depiction

Her lotus flower improves one's health, mental and physical. She is depicted holding a lotus flower, and sometimes with the musical instrument known as Shēng (笙), or a fènghuáng bird to accompany her. She may also carry a bamboo ladle or fly-whisk.



FONTE: http://www.ohioshaolindo.com/China's%20Arts/He'%20Shiang%20Ku.htm

He' Shiang Ku, (Ho Hsien-Ku )"The fragrant mushroom"; a merchants daughter, represents the feminine aspect or Yin energy
White Lotus Blossom Fly Whisk Magic Peach Floats on Leaf
This fighting form expresses He Siang Ku's slender build through the use of small stances, body twisted teasingly. Holds a wine goblet. Close range fighting techniques, making frequent use of the wrist grabs, elbows and knees, in this form.

associated with the Trigram Kun of the Bagua. Kun, a yin trigram relates to the direction South West, and is represented by the color Pink
He' Shiang Ku
"He' the fragrant mushroom". He' was born in the year of 800 A.D. He' was recognized by a historian as one of the most beautiful girls of all times. Unfortunately, she was born poor. In order to support her old and helpless parents, He' sold her body and became the most celebrated prostitute in China at that time. She taught herself how to read and write well. One day she dreamed that she had a sexual encounter with a very handsome scholar named Li Tung Ping and gained her immortality through this strange experience. The legend has it that the moment she gained her immortality, a pure white lotus flower grew out of her garment and stayed in bloom though eternity with her. In the Eight Immortal fighting system, she represented the feminine or Yin aspect of the fighting technique.


Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:22, modificato 3 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Mer 4 Ago 2010 - 16:50


FONTE immagine: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Cao%20Guojiu.jpg

Royal Uncle Cao

The newest of the Eight Immortals, Royal Uncle Cao or Cao Guojiu (曹國舅 in pinyin: cáo guó jiù or in Wade-Giles: Ts'ao Kuo-ch'iu) is named one of the following:

Cao Yi (曹佾 cáo yì) (courtesy name Gongbo (公伯 gōng bó))
Cao Jing (曹景 cáo jǐng)
Cao Jingxiu (曹景休 cáo jǐng xiū)
Cao You (曹友 cáo yǒu).
He was said to be the uncle of the Emperor of the Song Empire, being the younger brother of Empress Dowager Cao (曹太后 cáo tàihòu).

In historic records, there were several Emperor-consorts Caos in the Song Empire, but only one became empress: Cishengguangxian Empress (慈聖光獻皇后 cí shèng guāng xiàn huáng hoù) (1015 - 1079), the wife of the fourth Song emperor, Rénzōng (仁宗), none of whose children became an emperor.

However, this therefore does not render the historical existence of the "Royal Uncle Cao" impossible as in pre-modern China, the address "uncle" also meant "brother-in-law". Sometimes specified as "Wife-uncle" (妻舅 qī jiù) or as a respect, "Little Uncle" (舅子 jiù zǐ). Císhèngguāngxiàn Empress did have a younger brother named Cao Yi in historical record. But the given name of Royal Uncle Cao being Yi as well could be a post hoc.

Cao Guojiu's younger brother Cao Jingzhi (曹景植 cáo jǐng zhí) was a bully, but no one dared to prosecute him because of his powerful connections, not even after he killed a person. Royal Uncle Cao was so overwhelmed by sadness and shame on his brother that he resigned his office and left home.


Depiction


He is shown in the official's court dress with a jade tablet. Sometimes he holds castanets.

His jade tablet can purify the environment.

Royal Uncle Cao is considered the patron deity of actors


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Uncle_Cao




Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:23, modificato 1 volta
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Gio 5 Ago 2010 - 11:55


FONTE immagine: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/li%20tieguai.jpg

Iron-Crutch Li

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-Crutch_Li

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Iron-Crutch Li (李铁拐/李鐵拐, PY: Lǐ Tiěguǎi, WG: Li T'ieh-kuai, Japanese: Tekkai) is sometimes said to be the most ancient and popular of the Eight Immortals of the Taoist pantheon. He is sometimes described as irascible and ill-tempered, but also benevolent to the poor, sick and the needy, whose suffering he alleviates with special medicine from his gourd (calabash ). He is often portrayed as an ugly old man with dirty face, scraggy beard, and messy hair held by a golden band. He walks with the aid of an iron crutch (t'ieh kuai) and often has a gourd slung over his shoulder or held in his hand (Encyclopædia Britannica). He often is depicted as a clown figure who descends to earth in the form of a beggar who uses his power to fight for the oppressed and needy (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 1)

Path to Immortality


The Eight Immortals, the Pa Hsien, became immortal deities through the means of Taoist religion. Within the myth, they lived on an island paradise called Penglai Shan, found east of China, which only they could traverse due to the "weak water" which would not support ships. Among the eight immortals, Li Tieh-Kuai was one of the more popular, and was depicted as a man leaning on crutch and holding a gourd. Some say that in the myth the "gourd had spirals of smoke ascend from it, denoting his power of setting his spirit free from his body" (Wilson pg. 163). Others say that the gourd was full of medicine which he dispensed to the poor and needy (Encyclopædia Britannica).
The legend says that Iron-crutch Li was born during the Yuan dynasty period (Wilkinson pg. 48), and was originally named "Li Yüan". He studied with Lao Tzu  (founder of Taoism). He is said to have renounced material comforts and led a life of self-discipline as an act of religious devotion for 40 years, often going without food or sleep (Encyclopædia Britannica).
Li Tieh-Kuai, in the beginning of his Taoist training was said to live in a cave. He was said to be a handsome man. Lao Tzu tempted him with a beautiful woman he had made of wood. After refusing to acknowledge the presence of this woman and therefore defeating his temptation, Lao Tzu told him of his trick and rewarded him with a small white tablet. After consuming this tablet, Li Tieh-Kuai was never hungry nor ill (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 86-88). Lao Tzu again tempts Li Tieh-Kuai with money. Some robbers had buried money in Li Tieh-Kuai's field without knowing he was watching. Lao Tzu approached him in disguise and told him he should take any money that came to him. After Li Tieh-Kuai refused, saying that he did not care if he remained poor his whole life, Lao Tzu rewarded him with another pill. This pill bestowed upon Li Tieh-Kuai the ability to fly at amazing speeds (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 88-90).

Before becoming an immortal, it was previously stated that Li Tieh-Kuai was a very handsome man. However, on one occasion his spirit traveled to Heaven to meet with some other Immortals. He had told his apprentice, Li Ching, to wait for seven days for his spirit to return. If he did not return by then, Li Ching was to burn the body because that meant that he had become an immortal; but after six and a half days the student had to go home to see to his sick mother one last time before she died. So the student cremated the body of Li Tieh-Kuai. The student passed a dying beggar on his way to his mother's but did not have time to bury him. (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 90-91) Upon returning, Li Tieh-Kuai's spirit found that his body had been cremated and had to enter the only body available at the time, the corpse of the homeless beggar who had just died of starvation. The beggar, unfortunately, had a long and pointed head, large ears with one large brass earring, a woolly and dishevelled beard and hair. He also had long, scraggy, and dark eyebrows, dark eyes, and he had a pan lid on his head and a lame leg. Lao Tzu appeared and gave him a medicine gourd that could cure any illness and never emptied. Li Tieh-Kuai then brought the apprentice's mother back to life using the liquid from his gourd. Li Ching was then dismissed as his student, after being given a small pill and being told that he would work hard enough to become one of the Immortals himself. This turned out to be true (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 93-94).
"The gourd served as a bedroom for the night and held medicine, which Li dispensed with great beneficence to the poor and needy" (Encyclopaedia Britannica). Lao Tzu also used the bottle to make him an iron crutch that would never rust nor break (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 91). He then told Li Tieh-Kuai that he was ready to join the Immortals. From then on, Li Tieh-Kuai was charged to cure the sick and he travelled to many lands and "could be found wherever the sick lay dying or the poor were persecuted." (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 92)

Religious Influence


Probably the second most popular of the Eight Immortals, Iron-crutch Li is associated with medicine. His symbol of an iron crutch still hangs outside some traditional apothecaries. One of the reasons for him not being extremely popular is due to his "renowned bad temper and eccentricities" (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 26). Sometimes, the non devout seek out prescriptions from him through certain Taoist priests. His magical, medical gourd is his more popular sign which is favoured by professional exorcists. As a beggar, he uses his form to "fight for the rights of the poor and those in need" (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 26). "He is very much a clown figure and his popularity rests upon the twin attractions of being seen as one of the downtrodden, who is really more powerful than the strongest, and the clown who is irascible" (Ho and O'Brien, pg. 26)
The Eight Immortals are examples of how all can obtain immortality. Most of the immortals (including Iron-crutch Li) were common folk who attracted the attention of the gods through suffering unjust treatment, without complaint, and gave more to others than themselves. They were admitted to eternal life as a reward for their acts on earth and bearing gifts to Shoulao, who is the god of long life. (Christy pg.113). "The path to immortality includes achieving physical and spiritual harmony through meditation, diet, exercise, breath control, and the use of herbs. To achieve this state, one also had to eliminate all disease and evil from the body and spirit" (Wilkinson pg, 48).

Iconography


His characteristic emblems are the gourd bottle which identifies him as one of the Eight Immortals and also his iron crutch. A vapour cloud emanates from the gourd, and within it is the sage's hun ([soul ]); which may be depicted as a formless shape or as a miniature double of his bodily self.

References


• Christy, Anthony. Chinese Mythology. Peter Bearick Books: New York, 1983. 113.
• Ho, Kowk Man; O'Brien,Joanne - trans & ed. The Eight Immortals of Taoism: Legends and Fables of Popular Taoism. New York: Penguin Books, 1990. 1,26, 86-94.
• "Li T'ieh-kuai." Encyclopædia Britannica. 2008. Encyclopædia Britannica Online. 26 Oct. 2008 [1]
• Wilkinson, Philip. The Illustrated Dictionary of Mythology: Heroes, Heroines, Gods and Goddesses from Around the World. Readers Digest Association: Montreal, 1993. 48.
• Wilson, Eddie W. The Gourd in Folk Symbolism. Western Folklore, Vol.10, No. 2 (Apr.,1951), pp. 162-164. Western States Folklore Society. 28/10/2008 http://www.jstor.org/stable/1497969 








FONTE immagine: http://www.tao-chi.info/8-Immortals_Li_T_ieh-Kuai-b-555_Kan-o.jpg


Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:24, modificato 2 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Gio 5 Ago 2010 - 16:52


FONTE immagine: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Lan%20Caihe.jpg

Lan Caihe

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lan_Caihe

Lan Caihe (藍采和; pinyin: Lán Cǎihé; Wade-Giles: Lan Ts'ai-ho) is the least defined of the Eight Immortals. Lan Caihe's age and sex are unknown. Lan is usually depicted in sexually ambiguous clothing, but is often shown as a young boy or girl carrying a bamboo flower basket.[1]
Stories of Lan's behaviour are often bizarrely eccentric. Some sources dress Lan Caihe in a ragged blue gown, and refer to him as the patron immortal of minstrels. In another tradition, Lan is a female singer whose song lyrics accurately predict future events.[2]
He is often described as carrying a pair of bamboo castanets which he would clap and make a beat with by hitting the ground, he would then sing to this beat and a group of onlookers would follow and watch in amazement and entertain themselves. After these performances they would give him lots of money as he was beggar, Lan Cai He would then string this cash and coins on a long string of money he carried. As he walked the coins would fall off and Lan Cai He would not care, other beggars would then take the money.
He is often described as wearing only one shoe and other foot being bare, in the Winter it was said he slept naked in the snow and it melted and in the summer it was said he stuffed his clothes full and wore thick clothes despite the heat.
Like all the other immortals he was often said to be in a drunken stupor and he left this world by flying on a heavenly swan or crane into heaven. One day while in a tavern, he had supposedly gotten up to go to the bathroom. But before leaving he flew off on the crane or swan and stripped off his clothes on the way up.
He is sometimes said to be a transvestite or transsexual.

Sometimes shown as a young boy or woman. [1][2]

References


1. ^ Eberhard, Wolfram (1986). A Dictionary of Chinese Symbols: Hidden Symbols in Chinese Life and Thought. Routledge & Kegan Paul, London. ISBN 0415002281.
2. ^ Eberhard, Wolfram (1986). A Dictionary of Chinese Symbols: Hidden Symbols in Chinese Life and Thought. Routledge & Kegan Paul, London. ISBN 0415002281.







FONTE immagine: http://www.tao-chi.info/8-Immortals_Lan_Ts_ai-Ho-b-555_Kun-o.jpg


Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:25, modificato 2 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Gio 5 Ago 2010 - 16:55


http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Lu%20Dongbin.jpg



http://mypage.uniserve.ca/%7Ebggibson/sara/Healing/Lu%20Tung-Pin.jpg

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%BC_Dongbin

Lǚ Dòngbīn (呂洞賓) (spelled Lü Tung-Pin in Wade-Giles) is a historical figure and also a deity/Immortal revered by many in the Chinese culture sphere, especially by Daoists/Taoists. Lǚ Dòngbīn is one of the most widely known of the group of deities known as the Eight Immortals and considered by some to be the de facto leader. (The formal leader is more likely said to be Zhongli Quan or sometimes Iron-Crutch Li.) He is also a historical figure who was mentioned in the official history book "History of Song". Lǚ is widely considered to be one of the earliest masters of the tradition of Neidan, or Internal alchemy.

Names

Lu Dongbin status at Wan Chai Pak Tai Temple, Hong Kong
His name is Lü Yán, with Yán (巖 or 岩 or 喦) being the given name. Dòngbīn is his courtesy name. He is called Master Pure-Yang (純陽子 Chunyang Zi), and is also called Lü the Progenitor (呂祖 lü zŭ) by some Daoist, especially those of the Quanzhen School. He was born in Jingzhao Prefecture (京兆府 Jīngzhào Fŭ) around 796 C.E. during the Tang Dynasty. He is depicted in art as being dressed as a scholar and he often bears a sword on his back that dispels evil spirits.

Birth and early life

When he was born, a fragrance allegedly filled the room. His birthday is said to be on the fourteenth day of the fourth month of the Chinese Calendar. He has been very intelligent since childhood and had many academic achievements. However, according to one story, still unmarried by the age of 20, Lü twice took the top-level civil service exam to become a government official, but did not succeed.
Yellow Millet Dream

The legend has it that one night when Lü Yan was in Chang'an or Handan (邯鄲 Hándān), he dozed off as his yellow millet was cooking in a hotel. He dreamed that he took the imperial exam and excelled, and thus was awarded a prestigious office and soon promoted to the position of vice minister (侍郎). He then married the daughter of a prosperous household and had a son and a daughter. He was promoted again and again, and finally became the prime minister. However, his success and luck attracted jealousy of others, so he was accused of crimes that caused him to lose his office. His wife then betrayed him, his children were killed by bandits, and he lost all his wealth. As he was dying on the street in the dream, he woke up.
Although in the dream, eighteen years had passed, the whole dream actually happened in the time it took his millet to cook. The characters from his dream were actually played by Zhongli Quan in order to make him realize that one should not put too much importance on transient glory and success. As a result, Lü went with Zhongli to discover and cultivate the Dao/Tao. This dream is known as "Dream of the Yellow Millet" (黃粱夢 Húang Líang Mèng) and is described in a writing compiled by Ma Zhiyuan (馬致遠 Mă Zhìyǔan) in Yuan Dynasty.
In volume 82 of Song's Li Fang (李昉 Lǐ Fǎng)'s Extensive Records of Taiping (《太平廣記》), an earlier version of the story, Lü Dongbin was replaced by Student Lu (盧生 Lu Sheng), and Zhongli Quan by Elder Lü (呂翁 Lǚ wēng).
The exact age of Lü Yan when this incident occurred varies in the tellings, from 20 years of age to 40.
Character

Lü Dongbin is usually portrayed as a scholarly, clever man with a genuine desire to help people obtain wisdom/enlightenment and to learn the Tao. However, he is often portrayed as having some character "flaws", not an uncommon theme for the colorful Taoist immortals, all of whom in general have various eccentricities:

• He is said to be a ladies man, even after (or only after) becoming an immortal - and for this reason he is generally not invoked by people with romantic problems. This may also relate to some of the Taoist sexual arts.
• He is portrayed as having bouts of drunkenness, which was not uncommon among the often fun-loving Eight Immortals. This also parallels several Taoist artists renown for their love of drinking.
• One story relates that early on after becoming immortal, he had a strong temper as a "young" Immortal, even deforming a riverbank in a bout of anger.

Zhongli Quan


According to one story, Lü's teacher Zhongli Quan became an immortal and was about to fly to heaven, while saying to Lü that if he kept practicing the Tao he would also be able to fly to heaven himself very soon. Lü Dongbin replied to his teacher that he'll fly to heaven only after he enlightens all the sentient beings on earth (another story says all his relatives). According to the book "The Eight Immortals Achieving the Tao (《八仙得道摶》)," in his previous incarnation, Lü Dongbin was a Taoist master and the teacher of Zhongli Quan.


Stories and legends

Since the Northern Song Dynasty, there have been many stories and legends that are connected to Lü Dongbin. The stories were usually about Lü helping others to learn the Tao. According to the official History of the Song Dynasty (《宋史》), Lü was seen several times visiting the house of Chen Tuan (陳摶), who was believed to be the first person to present to the public the Taijitu.
The kindness of Lü Dongbin is demonstrated in the Chinese proverb "dog bites Lü Dongbin" (狗咬呂洞賓 gŏu yăo Lǚ Dòngbīn), which means an inability to recognize goodness and repay kindness with vice. Some say that the original proverb should actually be "苟杳呂洞賓,不識好人心," stemming from a story about the friendship between Gou Miao (苟杳) and Lü Dongbin, who both did for the other great favors, each of which seemed like a disservice initially, signifying the importance of having faith in one's friends.
According to Richard Wilhelm, Lü was the founder of the School of the Golden Elixir of Life (Jin Dan Jiao), and originator of the material presented in the book "Tai Yi Jin Hua Zong Zhi" (《太一金華宗旨》), or The Secret of the Golden Flower. Also, according to Daoist legend, he is the founder of the internal martial arts style called "Eight Immortals Sword" (八仙剑), considered to be one of the martial treasures of Wudangshan.

Lü is also a very productive poet. His works were collected in the "Quan Tang Shi" (《全唐詩》 Complete Tang Dynasty Poetry ).
According to the Taoist book "History of the Immortals" (《歷代神仙通鑒》), Lü is the reincarnation of the ancient Sage-King "Huang-Tan-Shi" (皇覃氏).



http://fineartamerica.com/images-medium/lu-tung-pin-yuri-leitch.jpg




http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/zoom/F1916.586.jpg


Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:26, modificato 6 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Gio 5 Ago 2010 - 17:01


FONTE immagine: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Zhang%20Guolao.jpg

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elder_Zhang_Guo


Elder Zhang Guo

"Elder Zhang Guo" or "Zhang Guo Lao" (Chinese: 張果老; Pinyin: Zhāng Guǒ Lǎo; Wade-Giles: Chang Kuo Lao; Japanese: Chokaro) is one of the Eight Immortals. Of the Eight Immortals he, along with Chung-li Ch'uan and Lu Yen, was a real historical figure; the rest exist only in legend. His existence is said to have begun around the middle or end of the seventh century A.D., and ended approximately in the middle of the eighth. The epithet "Lao" added at the end of his name means "old".[1]

Life

Elder Zhang Guo was a Taoist fangshi (方士 "occultist-alchemist") who lived as a hermit on Mount Tiáo (條山) in the Heng Prefecture (恒州 Héngzhōu) during the Tang Dynasty. By the time of Empress Wu, he claimed to be several hundred years old. A strong believer in the magic of necromancy, he also declared that he had been Grand Minister to the Emperor Yao during a previous incarnation.[2] Zhang Guo Lao also had a love for wine and winemaking. He was known to make liquor from herbs and shrubs as a hobby. Other members of the Eight Immortals drank his wine, which they believed to have healing or medicinal properties. He was also known to be a master of Taoist Breath or Qigong and could go without food for days, surviving on only a few sips of wine.[3]
He was the most eccentric of the eight immortals, as one can see from the kung fu style that was dedicated to him. The style includes moves such as delivering a kick during a back flip or bending so far back that your shoulders touch the ground. He was known to be quite entertaining, often making himself invisible, drinking off of poisonous flowers, plucking birds from the sky, as well as wilting flowers simply by pointing in their direction, while in the presence of Emperors.[4]

Depiction in Art and Culture

Zhang Kuo Lao appears frequently in Chinese paintings and sculpture, either with the Eight Immortals or alone, and, like the other immortals, can seen in many different common artistic mediums and everyday objects. He can be seen standing or seated, but is most often shown riding his white mule, which he is usually riding backwards. His emblem is a Yü Ku[5], or fish drum, which is a tube-shaped bamboo drum with two iron rods or mallets that he carries with him [6], or carrying a phoenix feather or a peach, representing immortality.[7] Since he represents old age, in the Taoist Feng Shui tradition a picture or statue of Zhang Kuo can be placed in the home or bedroom of an elderly person to help bring them a long life and a good, natural death.[8] A picture of him on his mule offering a descendant to a newly wed couple can also be found in Daoist nuptial chapels.[9]

Legends


Zhang Guo Lao was known for wandering between the Fen River & Chin territories during his lifetime and was known to travel at least a thousand li per day upon a white donkey or mule.[10] When his journey was finished, he folded his mule up and placed it in his pocket or a small box.[11] When he wished to use the mule again, he poured water on it from his mouth and the mule regained its form.[12]
Emperors of the T'ang dynasty (T'ai Tsung and Kao Tsung) often invited Zhang Guo Lao to court, but he always declined these invitations. Once, when asked by Empress Wu, he finally agreed to leave his hermitage. As he reached the gate of the Temple of the Jealous Woman, he died suddenly. His body was seen decomposing and being consumed by worms, but he was later seen, alive and well, on the mountains of Heng Chou in P'ing-yang Fu.[13]
In the twenty-third year (A.D. 735) of the reign-period K'ai Yüan of the Emperor Hsüan Tsung of the Tang dynasty, Zhang Guo Lao was called to Lo-yang in Honan, and elected Chief of the Imperial Academy, with the honorable title of "Very Perspicacious Teacher". At this time, the famous Taoist Yeh Fa-shan was in great favor at Court, thanks to his skill in necromancy. When asked who this Zhang Guo Lao was, the magician replied, "I know, but if I were to tell your Majesty, I should fall dead at your feet, so I dare not speak unless your Majesty will promise that you will go with bare feet and bare head to ask Zhang Guo Lao to forgive you, in which case I should immediately revive."

Hsüan Tsung having promised, Fa-shan then said: "Zhang Guo Lao is a white spiritual bat which came out of primeval chaos." Zhang Guo Lao was believed by some to be able to transform himself into a bat, another symbol of permanence. After giving this information, Fa-shan immediately dropped dead at the Emperor's feet. Hsüan Tsung, with bald head and feet, went to Zhang Guo Lao as he had promised. After begging him for forgiveness for his indiscretion, Zhang Guo Lao then sprinkled water on Fa-shan's face and he revived. Soon after during the period A.D. 742-746, Zhang Guo Lao fell ill and returned to die in the Heng Chou Mountains. When his disciples opened his tomb, they found it empty.[14]

Notes


1. ^ Werner 288, 294-295
2. ^ Werner p. 294
3. ^ Yetts, W. Percival p.786.
4. ^ Werner p. 294
5. ^ Williams, pp.151-153
6. ^ Giles, Lionel p.123.
7. ^ Werner p.296.
8. ^ Too, Lillian p.214
9. ^ Werner p.296
10. ^ Werner p.294
11. ^ Maspero, Henry p.162
12. ^ Werner p.294
13. ^ Werner p.294
14. ^ Werner p.294

References


• Giles, Lionel. A Gallery of Chinese Immortals. Ed. J.L. Cranmer Byng, M.C. London: J. Murray, 1948.
• Maspero, Henry. Taoism and Chinese Religion. Amherst: The University of Massachusetts Press, 1981.
• Too, Lillian. Total Feng Shui: Bring Health, Wellness and Happiness Into Your Life. Chronicle Books, 2004.
• Werner, Edward T. C. Ancient Tales and Folklore of China. London: Bracken Books, 1986.
• Werner, Edward T. C. Myths and Legends of China. London: 1922. Sacred-texts.com, 2002.
• Williams, C. A. S. Outlines of Chinese Symbolism and Art Motives. Rutland, Vt.: C.E. Tuttle Co., 1974.
• Yetts, W. Percival. "The Eight Immortals". The Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland for 1916. London, 1916. sacred-texts.com, 2002.



Ultima modifica di Admin il Ven 10 Dic 2010 - 17:27, modificato 2 volte
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Gio 5 Ago 2010 - 17:04



FONTE: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Zhongli%20Quan(1).jpg


FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhongli_Quan


Zhongli Quan (Chinese: 鐘離權 or 鐘离權; Pinyin: Zhōnglí Quán; Wade-Giles: Chung-li Ch'üan) is one of the most ancient of the Eight Immortals (some others say the oldest is Iron-crutch Li or Elder Zhang Guo, or Lü Dongbin) and the leader of the group. (Some people consider Lü Dongbin to be an informal leader.) He is also known as Zhongli of Han (Han Zhongli 漢鐘離) because he was said to be born during the Han Dynasty. He possesses a fan which has the magical ability of reviving the dead.

Life

Born in Yantai (燕台 Yàntái), Zhongli Quan was once a general serving in the army of the Han Dynasty. According to legends, bright beams of light filled the labour room during his birth. After birth he did not stop crying until seven full days had passed. Later Taoists celebrate his birthday on the fifteenth day of the fourth month of the Chinese Calendar.

In Taoism, he is known as "正陽祖師" (Zhèngyáng Zǔshī), literally the True-Yang Ancestor-Master. He is also called "Master of the Cloud-Chamber" (雲房先生 Yún Fáng Xiān Shēng) in accounts describing his encounter with Lü Dongbin before achieving immortality.

He has a rare Chinese compound surname, Zhongli (鐘離). He is one of three leaders of the group of the eight immortals.


Usually depicted with his chest and belly bare and holding a fan.

Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Admin
Admin
Admin


Maschile Capra
Numero di messaggi : 2142
Data d'iscrizione : 04.02.09
Età : 37
Località : Roma

MessaggioOggetto: Philosopher Han Xiang    Mar 14 Set 2010 - 11:31



FONTE: http://www.chine-informations.com/images/upload2/Han%20Xiangzi.jpg

One of the Eight Immortals, Philosopher Han Xiang (韓湘子 in pinyin: hán xiāng zi) or Han Xiang Zi, in Wade-Giles as Han Hsiang Tzu, was born Han Xiang during the Tang Dynasty, and his courtesy name is Qingfu (清夫 qīng fū). He is said to be the nephew or grandson of Han Yu, a prominent statesman of Tang Court. Han Xiang studied Daoism under Lü Dongbin. Once at a banquet by Han Yu, Han Xiang tried to persuade Han Yu to give up a life of officialdom and to study magic with him. But Han Yu was adamant that Han Xiang should dedicate his life to Confucianism instead of Daoism, so Han Xiang demonstrated the power of the Dao by pouring out cup after cup of wine from the gourd without end.

Because his flute gives life, Han became a protector of flautists.


FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Xiang



FONTE: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/Han_Xiangzi.jpg
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Tila
Iniziato Sciamano
Iniziato Sciamano


Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Ven 6 Lug 2012 - 8:13

Admin inserisco la versione italiana di wikipedia...buona lettura!


FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Otto_Immortali

Otto Immortali
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Gli Otto Immortali (cinese: 八仙; pinyin: Bāxiān; Wade-Giles: Pa-hsien) sono un gruppo di leggendari xian (immortali; trascendenti; santi) nella mitologia cinese. Ciascun potere degli Immortali può essere trasferito a un oggetto (法器) in grado di dare la vita o di sconfiggere il male. Insieme, questi otto oggetti sono chiamati "Otto Immortali Celati" (暗八仙 àn ~). Si dice che la maggior parte di essi sia nata durante la Dinastia Tang o la Dinastia Song. Sono venerati dai taoisti e apprezzati nella secolare cultura cinese. La leggenda narra che vivono su un gruppo di cinque isole nel Mare di Bohai, tra cui la montagna-isola di Penglai.

Tre di questi immortali sarebbero personaggi storici, mentre gli altri sono puramente leggendari.

Zhongli Quan
Lü Dongbin
He Xiangu: la donna
Li Tieguai: il povero;
Zhang Guolao (storico)
Han Xiangzi: il giovane.
Cao Guojiu
Lan Caihe



Il Monte Penglai, uno dei luoghi che secondo la leggenda erano abitati dagli otto immortali.
FONTE IMMAGINE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:YuanJiang-Penglai_Island.jpg

Rapporti tra gli immortali

Si possono associare o contrapporre:

l'aristocratico - il proletario;
il ricco - il povero;
il giovane - il vecchio;
l’uomo - la donna

in loro si vede la rappresentazione di tutta la società.

Nella letteratura antecedente al 1970, essi venivano talvolta definiti come Otto Jinn. Inizialmente descritti durante la Dinastia Yuan, ricevettero l'attuale denominazione dagli Otto Immortali di Huainan.

Nell'arte

La tradizione di descrivere gli uomini che sono diventati immortali è un tòpos nell'arte cinese e quando la religione taoista divenne popolare, abbracciò rapidamente questa tradizione con i suoi immortali. Mentre i culti dedicati ai vari immortali taoisti nascevano nella Dinastia Han, i popolari e meglio conosciuti Otto Immortali nacquero nella Dinastia Jin (金朝). L'arte delle tombe Jin dei secoli XII e XIII mostra un gruppo di otto taoisti immortali in murales e sculture. Divennero ufficialmente conosciuti come Otto Immortali nelle scritture e nelle opere artistiche della setta taoista noto come Completa Realizzazione (Quanshen). La più famosa rappresentazione artistica degli Otto Immortali si trova nel Tempio della Gioia Eterna (Yongle Gong) a Ruicheng.

Gli Otto Immortali sono considerati portatori di prosperità e longevità, quindi erano un tòpos nell'arte antica. Erano frequenti ornamenti sui vasi di celadon. Venivano inoltre rappresentati nelle sculture di proprietà dei nobili. Le loro rappresentazioni più comuni, tuttavia, erano nei dipinti. Molti dipinti di seta e affreschi murali raffigurano gli Otto Immortali. Vengono spesso raffigurati tutti insieme, a volte anche singolarmente, per omaggiare le qualità di quel singolo Immortale.

Un’interessante ricorrenza artistica degli Otto Immortali è quella che li ritrae spesso accompagnati da fanciulle con mani adornate di giada, comunemente rappresentate come serve di divinità di rango maggiore, o altre immagini che mostrano grande potere spirituale. L’importanza degli Otto Immortali per i taoisti è rilevante soprattutto durante la Dinastia Ming e le Dinastie Qing. Durante queste dinastie, gli Otto Immortali sono spesso rappresentati insieme ad altre divinità nelle opere artistiche. Vi sono molti dipinti che li raffigurano insieme alle Tre Stelle (gli dei della longevità, dell’emolumento e della fortuna). Altre importanti divinità, come la Regina Madre dell’Ovest, sono spesso in compagnia degli Otto Immortali.

L’arte degli Otto Immortali non si limita alla pittura o ad opere visive. Sono citati anche nella scrittura. Alcuni autori e commediografi scrissero numerose storie e opere sugli Otto Immortali. Una famosa storia scritta numerose volte e adattata al teatro (la cui rappresentazione più famosa fu scritta da Mu Zhiyuan durante la dinastia Yuan) è The Yellow-Millet Dream ed è la storia di come Lǚ Dòngbīn incontri Zhongli Quan e inizi il suo cammino verso l’immortalità.

Nella letteratura

Gli Immortali sono i soggetti di molte creazioni artistiche, come dipinti e sculture. Esempi di riferimenti nella scrittura includono:

The Yueyang Mansion (《岳陽樓》 yuè yáng lòu) di Ma Zhiyuan (馬致遠 mǎ zhì yuǎn).
The Bamboo-leaved Boat (《竹葉船》 zhú yè chuán) di Fan Zi'an (范子安 fàn zǐ ān).
The Willow in the South of the City (《城南柳》 chéng nán liǔ) di Gu Zijing (谷子敬 gǔ zǐ jìng).
Il riferimento scritto più significativo è The Eight Immortals Depart and Travel to the East (《八仙出處東游記》 bā xiān chū chù dōng yoú jì) di Wu Yuantai (吳元泰 wú yuán taì) nella Dinastia Ming.
C'è un'altra opera composta durante la Dinastia Ming, di uno scrittore anonimo, chiamato The Eight Immortals Cross the Sea (《八仙過海》 bā xiān guò hǎi). Riguarda gli Otto Immortali che si recano alla Conferenza della Pesca Magica (蟠桃會 pán taó huì) e si trovano di fronte ad un oceano. Invece di attraversarlo a bordo delle loro nuvole, Lü Dongbin suggerì che insieme abbiano usato i loro poteri per superarlo. Ispirato da questa narrazione, il proverbio cinese "Gli Otto Immortali attraversano il mare, ciascuno rivela il suo divino potere" (八仙過海,各顯神通 ~, gè xiǎn shén tōng) indica la situazione in cui tutti uniscono le forze per raggiungere un obiettivo comune.

Nel Qigong e nelle arti marziali cinesi

Gli Otto Immortali sono legati allo sviluppo degli esercizi di qigong, come il Baduanjin. Ci sono alcune arti marziali cinesi il cui nome deriva dagli Otto Immortali. Esse prevedono tecniche di lotta ispirate alle caratteristiche di ciascun Immortale.

Venerazione

Inaugurato durante la Dinastia Song, il tempio di Xi'an è chiamato Palazzo degli Otto Immortali (八仙宮), precedentemente Monastero degli Otto Immortali (八仙庵), dove statue degli Immortali possono essere trovate nell'Arca degli Otto Immortali (八仙殿). In Mu-Cha (木柵 mù zhà), Taipei, capitale di Taiwan, c'è un tempio chiamato Palazzo del Sud (南宮), soprannominato Tempio degli Otto Immortali (八仙廟 ~ miào). E a Singapore, c'è un tempio chiamato Xian Gu Tian (仙姑殿) che venera gli Otto Immortali, insieme alla divinità principale He Xian Gu.

Moderne rappresentazioni

Nella Cina odierna, gli Otto Immortali sono una rappresentazione artistica ricorrente. Dipinti, ceramiche e statue degli Otto Immortali sono comuni presso le abitazioni cinesi e si diffondono in tutto il mondo.

Sono stati prodotti alcuni film in Cina sugli Otto Immortali.

Nel film Drunken Master di Jackie Chan, ci sono otto "forme" di Kung Fu ubriache, che si dice siano nate dagli Otto Immortali. Inizialmente il protagonista non vuole apprendere lo stile di He Xiangu perché la ritiene troppo femminea, ma ne svilupperà una personale variante.

Gli Otto Immortali giocano un ruolo importante nella trama del videogame Fear Effect 2: Retro Helix.

Nella serie a fumetti X-Men, gli Otto Immortali appaiono per proteggere la Cina insieme all'Uomo Collettivo, quando il mutante Xorn compie un massacro in un piccolo villaggio.

Gli Otto Immortali sono presenti nella serie animata Le avventure di Jackie Chan. Essi sono coloro che hanno sconfitto gli Otto Stregoni Demoniaci e li hanno sigillati nell'oltretomba usando degli oggetti che simboleggiano il loro potere. Hanno poi aperto il Panku box per trasferirsi nella prigione dei demoni. Negli episodi più recenti, gli oggetti che gli immortali usarono per sigillare i demoni hanno assorbito alcuni dei poteri dei demoni stessi e sono ora cercati da Drago, figlio di Shendu (uno degli Otto Stregoni Demoniaci), affinché incrementino i suoi poteri.

Ne Il regno proibito, Jackie Chan interpreta il personaggio Lu Yun, uno degli Otto Immortali. Questo fu rivelato dal regista in un inserto speciale del film, Sun Wukong e gli Otto Immortali.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhongli_Quan

Zhongli Quan
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Zhongli Quan (cinese tradizionale: 鐘離權; cinese semplificato: 钟离权; pinyin: Zhōnglí Quán; Wade-Giles: Chung-li Ch'üan) è il primo degli Otto Immortali nonché il leader del gruppo.

Nato nello Shanxi prima della venuta di Cristo, fu un generale dell'esercito durante la Dinastia Han e, diventato vecchio, andò a vivere da eremita nei monti Yang Jiao. Ma esistono diverse versioni riguardanti questo personaggio, che forse è di origine storica. Era in grado di tramutare il rame in argento per mezzo di una droga e distribuiva poi ai poveri il suo metallo prezioso. Un giorno una gru celeste lo trasportò nel paradiso dell'immortalità. I moderni taoisti celebrano il suo compleanno il quindicesimo giorno del quarto mese del Calendario Cinese.

Nella cultura taoista è conosciuto come "正陽祖師" (Zhèngyáng Zǔshī). Viene anche chiamato (雲房先生 Yún Fáng Xiān Shēng) nelle storie che descrivono il suo incontro con Lü Dongbin prima di raggiungere l'immortalità.

Possiede un raro cognome composto cinese, Zhongli (鐘離).


Rappresentazione

Obeso, grasso, la pancia per aria, barbuto, con due piccoli chignon rotondi sulle tempie, ha come attributo principale un ventaglio che gli serve per cacciare le creature malefiche e anche per risvegliare l'anima dei defunti, creando un vento agitando le ali. Zhongli Quan nell’altra mano ha anche la pesca dell'immortalità o il fungo magico della longevità, oppure anche il frutto che viene detto “mano di Budda”, il Citrus digitata, simbolo di prosperità.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%C3%BC_Dongbin

Lü Dongbin
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Lü Dongbin (呂洞賓) (Lü Tung-Pin in Wade-Giles) è uno degli Otto Immortali, leader de facto del gruppo (secondo alcune fonti sarebbe Li Tieguai, mentre il leader formale è Zhongli Quan) ed è il patrono dei fabbricanti di inchiostro, dei malati e dei barbieri.

Il sogno del miglio giallo

La leggenda narra che una notte, mentre Lü Yan si trovava a Chang'an o a Handan (邯鄲 Hándān), si addormentò mentre stava cucinando il suo miglio giallo. Sognò di sostenere l'esame imperiale ed eccellere al punto di vedersi affidare un ruolo prestigioso. La sua ascesa al potere fu talmente rapida che presto fu nominato vice-ministro (侍郎 shìláng). Poi sposò la figlia di un ricco familiare, dalla quale ebbe un bambino e una bambina. Intanto veniva promosso più volte, finché venne eletto primo ministro. Tuttavia, il suo successo e la sua fortuna suscitarono la gelosia di altri, quindi fu accusato di aver commesso crimini che gli fecero perdere la carica. Sua moglie poi lo tradì, i suoi bambini furono uccisi dai banditi e perse ogni ricchezza. Mentre stava morendo su una strada nel sogno, si svegliò.

Nonostante nel sogno fossero passati diciotto anni, l'intero sonno aveva impiegato il tempo di cottura del miglio. I personaggi del suo sogno erano stati interpretati da Zhongli Quan per fargli capire che non si dovrebbe dare troppa importanza alla gloria e al successo transitori. Lü decise di seguire Zhongli per scoprire e sviluppare l'arte del Tao. Questo sogno è conosciuto come "Il sogno del miglio giallo" (黃粱夢 Huáng Liáng Mèng) ed è descritto in un'opera di Ma Zhiyuan (馬致遠 Mǎ Zhìyuǎn) nella Dinastia Yuan.
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Tila
Iniziato Sciamano
Iniziato Sciamano


Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Ven 6 Lug 2012 - 8:20

FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/He_Xiangu

He Xiangu
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

He Xiangu (何仙姑 Hé Xiān Gū in pinyin o Ho Hsien-ku in Wade-Giles), Donna Immortale He o Hé Qióng (何瓊 Hé Qióng) è l’unica divinità femminile tra gli Otto Immortali (il genere di un altro Immortale, Lán Cǎihé, è ermafrodita). È la fata che veglia sui focolari domestici.

Nata da un bottegaio dello Hunan ai tempi dell'imperatrice Wu Zetian (690-705), la vergine immortale He Xiangu ha l'aspetto di una fata. Nacque con sei capelli in testa e non le crebbero mai di più. Quando compì 14 o 15 anni, un personaggio divino le apparve in sogno e le consiglio di mangiare polvere di madreperla, in modo che il suo corpo potesse rimanere evanescente ed eterno. Ella seguì il consiglio e, subito dopo, promise di rimanere vergine.

Scomparve e divenne immortale mentre si recava dall’imperatrice Wu Zetian che l’aveva convocata.

Rappresentazione

He Xiangu è rappresentata come una graziosa ragazza, che porta su una spalla un lungo gambo di loto curvilineo, terminante con un fiore o con una capsula di semi. Questo stelo di loto magico è in grado di guarire qualsiasi malessere fisico e mentale. Talvolta porta con sé uno scettro o un organo a bocca.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li_Tieguai

Li Tieguai
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Li Tieguai è uno dei più popolari fra gli Otto Immortali. È descritto come irascibile e irritabile, ma anche generoso con i poveri, i malati e i bisognosi, le cui sofferenze vengono alleviate da una speciale medicina estratta dalla sua zucca. Simboleggia la medicina e la sua immagine veniva usata come emblema delle farmacie cinesi.

La leggenda narra che, prima di diventare Immortale, Li Tieguai fosse un uomo molto attraente. Fu convocato da Laozi nei monti della Longevità per incontrare gli altri Immortali. Prima di partire, disse al suo discepolo, Li Ching, di aspettare per sette giorni il suo ritorno. Se non fosse tornato entro questo periodo di tempo, Li Ching avrebbe dovuto bruciare il suo corpo, perché significava che Li Tieguai sarebbe diventato un Immortale; dopo sei giorni e mezzo, l'allievo fu costretto a tornare a casa per visitare la madre malata che era ormai in punto di morte e bruciò il corpo del maestro in anticipo. Quando lo spirito di Li Tieguai tornò, vide che il suo corpo era stato bruciato e partì allora alla ricerca di un altro corpo in cui alloggiare. In un bosco, trovò soltanto il cadavere un mendicante zoppo e orrendo, morto di fame. In mancanza di meglio l'anima vi si rifugiò, e da quel giorno Li Tieguai, suo malgrado, si trovò in questo corpo d’invalido. Laozi apparve e gli consegnò una medicina in grado di guarire ogni male e che non si esauriva mai, attraverso cui riportò in vita la madre di Li Ching. Lo studente fu poi destituito dal suo incarico, perché Li Tieguai confidava che, attraverso il duro lavoro, anche Li Ching sarebbe diventato Immortale. Per mitigare le sue sfortune, Laozi gli regalò una gruccia di ferro, da cui deriva il suo soprannome, “Li stampella di ferro”. Laozi gli disse che era pronto per unirsi agli Immortali.

Rappresentazione

Ha l'aspetto di un mendicante cencioso e zoppo con in mano una fiaschetta da pellegrino contenente i suoi medicinali magici e, nell'altra, un bastone di ferro a cui si appoggia. Ha un'aria poco invitante e dalla sua zucca escono turbinando misteriosi vapori. Talvolta è rappresentato in piedi su un granchio o in compagnia di un cervo o di un daino. La gruccia di ferro gli venne offerta da Laozi per sostituire la gamba paralizzata. Nel corso delle sue peregrinazioni sulla terra, si dice che sospendesse la propria borraccia a una fessura della parete della propria stanza, e dopo essersi magicamente rimpicciolito fino a raggiungere le dimensioni di una rana, la notte vi si rifugiasse all'interno, per dormire. Il giorno dopo ne usciva, ritornando per incanto alle normali dimensioni. Il suo spirito vitale poteva abbandonare a piacimento gli stracci carnali e assumere una natura eterea e informe. Talvolta si osservano i cinque pipistrelli simboleggianti le “cinque felicità” che volteggiano intorno a fumigazioni medicinali emananti dalla sua zucca.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhang_Guolao

Zhang Guolao
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Zhang Guolao (cinese: 張果老; Pinyin: Zhāng Guǒ Lǎo; Wade-Giles: Chang Kuo Lao; giapponese: Chokaro) è uno degli Otto Immortali. È uno dei tre Immortali realmente esistiti; sarebbe vissuto nell’VIII secolo e simboleggia la vecchiaia. L'epiteto Lao posto alla fine del suo nome significa "vecchio".

Zhang Guo era un fangshi (方士 occultista-alchimista)) che viveva da eremita sulle montagne dello Shan Xi durante la Dinastia Tang. Declinava regolarmente gli inviti che gli venivano fatti per recarsi a Corte, e morì improvvisamente il giorno in cui alla fine accettò. Tra i poteri magici, aveva quello di diventare invisibile o di bere senza battere ciglio tazze di fortissimi veleni. Era un amante del vino, al punto dal saper creare dei liquori da semplici erbe. Gli altri Immortali bevevano i suoi prodotti, credendo che avessero proprietà curative. Era anche un noto praticante del Taoismo e del Qigong ed era in grado di resistere molti giorni senza cibo, affidandosi al vino da lui stesso creato.

Rappresentazione

È raffigurato come un vecchio barbuto, dallo sguardo vivace, talvolta con in testa un berretto da letterato, ornato di una piuma di fenice. Porta sempre sulla schiena un bambù cavo da cui escono due bacchette piegate (uno strumento musicale a percussione). Viaggiava su una infaticabile mula bianca, capace di percorrere quotidianamente centinaia di leghe. Zhang è raffigurato sia seduto normalmente sul dorso della mula, sia seduto alla rovescia, voltato dalla parte della coda. Venuta la notte, appiattiva la sua mula come un foglio di carta, la piegava in quattro o in otto parti e la metteva al riparo nella sua borsa o nella scatola per i fazzoletti, che talvolta gli si vede tenere in mano. La mattina sputava sulla carta e la inumidiva, poi restituiva alla mula le sue forme animali naturali. Ed entrambi riprendevano il cammino. Nell’iconografia popolare, come nel caso della cicogna anglosassone, talvolta si vede l'Immortale portare un neonato a giovani donne sposate. Un’altra immagine talvolta lo mostra in piedi su un rospo gigante.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Han_Xiangzi

Han Xiangzi
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Han Xiangzi (韓湘子 in pinyin: Hán Xiāng Zi) o Han Xiang Zi (in Wade-Giles: Han Hsiang Tzu), è uno degli Otto Immortali e nacque come Han Xiang durante la Dinastia Tang. Il suo nome di cortesia è Qingfu (清夫 Qīng Fū). È il patrono dei musicisti.

Incarna la giovinezza e sembra sia vissuto all’inizio del IX secolo. Si dice che fosse nipote di Han Yu, un importante uomo di Stato della corte Tang. Era l’allievo preferito del secondo Immortale, Lü Dongbin. Mentre si dedicava alla pesca insieme a Lü Dongbin, Han Xiangzi cadde da un albero e divenne Immortale. Era solito vagabondare in mezzo alla natura, incantando gli uccelli e perfino gli animali selvatici per mezzo del suo flauto. Aveva anche il potere di far crescere istantaneamente piante meravigliose in una semplice manciata di terra. Infine non aveva la minima idea del valore del denaro, e lo disperdeva.

Rappresentazione

Han Xiangzi viene raffigurato mentre suona il flauto silvestre o il flauto traverso.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cao_Guojiu

Cao Guojiu
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Cao Guojiu (曹國舅 in pinyin: Cáo Guó Jiù o in Wade-Giles: Ts'ao Kuo-ch'iu) è l'ultimo degli Otto Immortali ed è il patrono degli attori e di tutti coloro che esercitano la professione teatrale. Possiede le seguenti denominazioni:

Cao Yi (曹佾 Cáo Yì) (nome di cortesia: Gongbo (公伯 gōng bó))
Cao Jing (曹景 Cáo Jǐng)
Cao Jingxiu (曹景休 Cáo Jǐng Xiū)
Cao You (曹友 Cáo Yǒu).

Prima di ritirarsi tra i monti, sembra che sia stato ministro della dinastia Song: era inoltre legato alla famiglia imperiale (XI secolo), essendo il fratello minore dell’imperatrice Cao Hu.

Il fratello minore di Cao Guojiu, Cao Jingzhi (曹景植 cáo jǐng zhí) era un prepotente, ma nessuno osò mai ribellarsi alle sue angherie, a causa delle sue conoscenze altolocate, nemmeno dopo averlo visto uccidere una persona. Cao Guojiu era così carico di tristezza e vergogna per suo fratello che rinunciò al suo incarico e fuggì, diventando eremita. I due primi Immortali che incontrò gli proposero ben presto di entrare nel gruppo e gli comunicarono la ricetta dell'immortalità. Fu scelto e reso immortale dagli altri Sette che occupavano sette delle otto grotte della Sfere Superiori, ed erano alla ricerca di un ottavo compagno meritevole.

Rappresentazione

Cao Guojiu viene rappresentato con in testa il potéou o pettinatura dei mandarini, con un corno dietro e alette laterali. Ha in mano delle nacchere (il suo attributo principale), ma talvolta anche uno scacciamosche. Può anche venir rappresentato vestito sfarzosamente con la doppia cintura dei frequentatori della corte imperiale.



FONTE: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lan_Caihe

Lan Caihe
Da Wikipedia, l'enciclopedia libera.

Lan Caihe (藍采和; pinyin: Lán Cǎihé; Wade-Giles: Lan Ts'ai-ho) è il meno noto degli Otto immortali ed è considerato patrono dei fiori.

L'età ed il sesso di Lan Caihe sono sconosciuti. La divinità può essere un ermafrodito, ma nella sua rappresentazione più nota è un ragazzo effeminato con un cesto di fiori in bambù.

Lan Caihe proviene, secondo la leggenda, dalla Dinastia Tang ed e conosciuto per il carattere fuori dal normale e per le sue stravaganze. Indossa solamente calzoncini e piccole leggere magliette d'inverno e una pesante giubba e pantaloni lunghi d'estate. Cammina normalmente con un piede scalzo e l'altro calzato.

Rappresentazione

Lan Caihe è variamente ritratto come un giovane effeminato, un anziano oppure una ragazza; nelle rappresentazioni moderne è generalmente una ragazza. Suoi emblemi distintivi sono il cesto di fiori, e spesso una zappa portata sulla spalla; alcune volte viene rappresentato seguito da un daino che tiene in bocca un fungo sacro. Il cesto contiene diversi tipi di fiori che vengono associati all'idea di longevità.
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Contenuto sponsorizzato




MessaggioOggetto: Re: Gli otto immortali   Oggi a 15:23

Tornare in alto Andare in basso
 
Gli otto immortali
Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Tornare in alto 
Pagina 1 di 1

Permesso di questo forum:Non puoi rispondere agli argomenti in questo forum
Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico :: SCIAMANESIMO :: I MONDI DELLO SCIAMANESIMO - WORLDS OF SHAMANISM :: ASIA :: CHINESE SHAMANISM- Sciamanesimo Cinese-
Andare verso: