Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico
Nei momenti più bui, ricorda sempre di fare un passo alla volta.
Voler ottenere tutto e subito è sciocco
Nei momenti più difficili, ricorda sempre che le abitudini stabiliscono un destino.
Stabilisci quelle che ti danno energia e crescita.
È solo nell’ora più profonda del Duat, nella Notte oscura dell’anima che possiamo vedere noi stessi.
E capire come superare la notte.
Non rifuggire l’oscurità, impara a vederci attraverso.
Tutto passa e scorre, il giorno diviene notte e la notte giorno.
Ciò che è bene per te ora domani diverrà un ostacolo e un impedimento, o un danno, e viceversa.
Tutto finisce e muta, come la pelle di un serpente.
Impara ad essere la volontà pura di vivere e non la pelle morta di un intento esaurito.
Tutto ciò che non supera l’alba del tuo nuovo giorno, non deve essere portato con te.
Il mondo è infinito, non giudicare perdite e guadagni come il piccolo pescatore che non ha mai visto l’Oceano.
Sconfinate sono le possibilità della Ruota.
Impara a fluire e solo allora senza occhi, senza orecchie né pensiero, vedrai, sentirai e capirai il Tao.
(Admin - Shamanism & Co. © 2011 - All rights reserved)


Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico

forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia, spirito critico, terapie alternative, esoterismo. Forum of shamanism, anthropology, criticism, alternative therapies and esoterism
 
IndicePortaleFAQCercaRegistrarsiAccedi

Condividere | 
 

 Miwok - Coast Miwok

Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Andare in basso 
AutoreMessaggio
Tila
Iniziato Sciamano
Iniziato Sciamano


Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Miwok - Coast Miwok   Gio 18 Nov 2010 - 20:30

FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miwok

Miwok
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Miwok (also spelled Miwuk, Mi-Wuk, or Me-Wuk) can refer to any one of four linguistically related groups of Native Americans, native to Northern California, who spoke one of the Miwokan languages in the Utian family. The word Miwok means people in their native language.

In 2008, ancient artifacts related to Miwok ancestors were unearthed in Calaveras County, some as many as 5000 years old. Many of the artifacts will be reburied with a special ceremony. The Miwok believe the artifacts belong to the land.[3]


FONTE IMMAGINE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:House_Miwok_Yosemite_CA.jpg

Contents
[hide]

* 1 Subgroups
* 2 Federally recognized tribes
o 2.1 Non-federally recognized tribes
* 3 Culture
o 3.1 Food
o 3.2 Mythology
o 3.3 Population size
* 4 See also
* 5 Notes
* 6 References
* 7 External links

[edit] Subgroups

Anthropologists commonly divide the Miwok into four geographically and culturally diverse ethnic subgroups. These distinctions were unknown among the Miwok before European contact.[4]

* Plains and Sierra Miwok: from the western slope and foothills of the Sierra Nevada, the Sacramento Valley, San Joaquin Valley and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

* Coast Miwok : from present day location of Marin County and southern Sonoma County. (This includes the Bodega Bay Miwok and Marin Miwok).

* Lake Miwok: from Clear Lake basin of Lake County.

* Bay Miwok: from present-day location of Contra Costa County.

[edit] Federally recognized tribes

The United States Bureau of Indian Affairs officially recognizes eleven tribes of Miwok, Mi-Wuk or Me-Wuk descent in California, as follows:

* Buena Vista Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians[5]
* California Valley Miwok Tribe (formerly known as the Sheep Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians)[6][7]
* Chicken Ranch Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians
* Ione Band of Miwok Indians, of Ione, California[8]
* Jackson Rancheria of Me-Wuk Indians
* Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract)[9]
* Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk Indians of the Tuolumne Rancheria
* United Auburn Indian Community of Auburn Rancheria[10]
* Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, formerly known as the Federated Coast Miwok[11]
* Middletown Rancheria (Members of this tribe are of Pomo, Lake Miwok, and Wintun descent)
* Wilton Rancheria Indian Tribe[12]

[edit] Non-federally recognized tribes

* Miwok Tribe of the El Dorado Rancheria
* Nashville-Eldorado Miwok Tribe]]
* Colfax- Todds Valley Consolidated Tribe of the Colfax Rancheria
* Southern Sierra Miwuk Nation
* Calaveras Band of Mi-Wuk Indians

[edit] Culture

The Miwok lived in small bands without centralized political authority before contact with European Americans in 1769. They had domesticated dogs and cultivated tobacco, but were otherwise hunter-gatherers.

[edit] Food

The Sierra Miwok preferentially exploited acorns from the California Black Oak, Quercus kelloggii; in fact, the modern-day extent of the California Black Oak forests in some areas of Yosemite National Park is partially due to preferential cultivation by Miwok tribes. They burned understory vegetation to reduce the fraction of Ponderosa Pine.[13] Nearly every other kind of edible vegetable matter was exploited as a food source, including bulbs, seeds, and fungi. Animals were hunted with arrows, clubs or snares, depending on the species and the situation. Grasshoppers were a highly prized food source, as were mussels for those groups adjacent to the Stanislaus River.

The Miwok ate meals according to appetite rather than at regular times. They stored food for later consumption, primarily in flat-bottomed baskets.

[edit] Mythology

Miwok mythology and narratives tend to be similar to those of other natives of Northern California. Miwok had totem animals, identified with one of two moieties, which were in turn associated respectively with land and water. These totem animals were not thought of as literal ancestors of humans, but rather as predecessors.[14]

[edit] Population size

In 1770, there were an estimated 500 Lake Miwok, 1,500 Coast Miwok, and 9,000 Plains and Sierra Miwok, totaling about 11,000 people, according to historian Alfred L. Kroeber, although this may be a serious undercount; for example, he did not identify the Bay Miwok.[14] The 1910 Census reported only 671 Miwok total, and the 1930 Census, 491. See history of each Miwok group for more information.[15] Today there are about 3,500 Miwok in total.[2]

Notes

1. ^ Craig D. Bates Museum Anthropology 17(2):13 (June 1993)
2. ^ a b "Miwok", California Indians and Reservations, San Diego State University, Library, accessed 30 Jun 2010
3. ^ "Ancient Artifacts Found At Construction Site", CBS 13 Retrieved: April 26, 2008
4. ^ Eugene L. Conrotto (1973). Miwok Means People: The Life and Fate of the Native Inhabitants of the California Gold Rush Country. Fresno, Calif.: Valley Publishers. p. 4. ISBN 0913548138.
5. ^ Buena Vista Rancheria - Me-Wuk Indians
6. ^ California Valley Miwok Tribe (CVMT GovPortal) - Official Website of the California Valley Miwok Tribe
7. ^ California Valley Miwok Tribe (CVMT WebPortal)
8. ^ Ione Band of Miwok Indians
9. ^ See this notice dated Tuesday, August 11, 2009 from the United States Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs Agency entitled "Indian Entities Recognized and Eligible To Receive Services From the United States Bureau of Indian Affairs" (Federal Register Vol. 74, No. 153)http://www.bia.gov/idc/groups/public/documents/text/idc002655.pdf). The "Shingle Springs Band of Miwok Indians, Shingle Springs Rancheria (Verona Tract)" is a single federally recognized Tribe.
10. ^ Welcome — United Auburn Indian Community
11. ^ Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria
12. ^ "Wilton Rancheria Announces Restoration of Status as Federally Recognized Indian Tribe", Sacramento Business Journal
13. ^ C. Michael Hogan (2008) Quercus kelloggii, Globaltwitcher.com, ed. Nicklas Stromberg
14. ^ a b Kroeber, 1925, p. 456
15. ^ Cook, 1976, pages 236-245.

[edit] References

* Access Genealogy: Indian Tribal records, Miwok Indian Tribe. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. Main source of "authenticated village" names and locations.
* Barrett, S.A. and Gifford, E.W. Miwok Material Culture: Indian Life of the Yosemite Region. Yosemite Association, Yosemite National Park, California, 1933. ISBN 0-939666-12-X
* Cook, Sherburne. The Conflict Between the California Indian and White Civilization. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press, 1976. ISBN 0-520-03143-1.
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1925. Handbook of the Indians of California. Washington, D.C: Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin No. 78. (Chapter 30, The Miwok); available at Yosemite Online Library.
* Silliman, Stephen. Lost Laborers in Colonial California, Native Americans and the Archaeology of Rancho Petaluma. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press, 2004. ISBN 0-8165-2381-9.



FONTE:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coast_Miwok

Coast Miwok
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Coast Miwok were the second largest group of Miwok Native American people. The Coast Miwok inhabited the general area of modern Marin County and southern Sonoma County in Northern California, from the Golden Gate north to Duncans Point and eastward to Sonoma Creek. The Coast Miwok included the Bodega Bay Miwok from authenticated Miwok villages around Bodega Bay and Marin Miwok.

Contents
[hide]

* 1 Culture
o 1.1 Religion
o 1.2 Traditional narratives
+ 1.2.1 Mythology
* 2 Authentic villages
* 3 History
o 3.1 Olompali and Nicasio
o 3.2 Recognition
* 4 Population
* 5 Notable Coast Miwoks
* 6 External links
* 7 Notes
* 8 References

[edit] Culture

The Coast Miwok spoke their own Coast Miwok language in the Utian linguistic group. They lived by hunting and gathering, and lived in small bands without centralized political authority. In the springtime they would head to the coasts to hunt salmon and other seafood. Otherwise their staple foods were primarily acorns, nuts and wild game such as California Mule Deer. They were skilled at basketry.

The Coast Miwok language is no longer natively spoken, but the Bodega dialect is documented in Callaghan (1970).

There is a recreated Coast Miwok village called Kule Loklo located at the Point Reyes National Seashore.

[edit] Religion

The original Coast Miwok people world view included Shamanism, and one form this took was the Kuksu religion that was evident in Central and Northern California. This included elaborate acting and dancing ceremonies in traditional costume, an annual mourning ceremony, puberty rites of passage, shamanic intervention with the spirit world and an all-male society that met in subterranean dance rooms.[1][2] Kuksu was shared with other indigenous ethnic groups of Central California, such as their neighbors the Pomo, also Maidu, Ohlone, Esselen, and northernmost Yokuts. However Kroeber observed less "specialized cosmogony" in the Miwok, which he termed one of the "southern Kuksu-dancing groups", in comparison to the Maidu and other northern California tribes.[3]

[edit] Traditional narratives
Main article: Coast Miwok traditional narratives

In their myths, legends, tales, and histories, the Coast Miwok participated in the general cultural pattern of Central California.[1]

[edit] Mythology
Main article: Miwok mythology

Coast Miwok mythology and narratives were similar to those of other natives of Central and Northern California. The Coast Miwok believed in animal and human spirits, and saw the animal spirits as their ancestors. Coyote was seen as their ancestor and creator god. In their case the earth began with land formed out of the Pacific Ocean.[4]

[edit] Authentic villages

The authenticated Coast Miwok villages are:[5]

* On Bodega Bay: Helapattai, Hime-takala, Ho-takala, Suwutenne, Tiwut-huya, Tokau. Also in this vicinity: Awachi (at the mouth of Estero Americano Creek), Amayelle (on San Antonio Creek), Kennekono (at Bodega Corners).
* On Tomales Bay: Echa-kolum, Shotommo-wi (near the mouth of San Antonio Creek), Sakloki (opposite Tomales Point, Dillon Beach area), Utumia (Near present-day town of Tomales.)
* At the present-day City of Petaluma: Etem, Petaluma (east of River). Also in this vicinity: Tuchayelin (northwest), Likatiut (on Petaluma River north of town), Meleya (on San Antonio Creek southwest of Petaluma), Susuli (northwest), Tulme (northwest), Wotoki (on the south side of the Petaluma River).
* At the present-day City of San Rafael: Awani-wi.
* At the present-day City of Sonoma: Huchi. Also in this vicinity: Temblek (west), Tuli (northwest), Wugilwa (on Sonoma Creek).
* At the present-day City of Cotati: Kotati, Lumen-takala (northeast). Also in this vicinity: Payinecha (west).
* At the present-day town of Nicasio: Echa-tamai.
* At the present-day town of Olema: Olema-loke.
* At the present-day City of Sausalito: Liwanelowa.
* Near the present-day town of Bolinas: Bauli-n
* Near the present-day town of Freestone: Oye-yomi, Pakahuwe, Patawa-yomi.
* Near the present-day town of Ignacio: Ewu, Puyuku (south), Shotokmo-cha (southeast).
* Near the present-day City of Novato: Chokeche, Olompolli (northwest).
* Near the present-day town of Valley Ford: Ewapalt, Uli-yomi (at the headwaters of Estero Americano Creek).
* Near the present-day town of Salmon Creek: Pulya-lakum (on the ocean, near the mouth of Salmon Creek).

[edit] History

Documentation of Miwok peoples dates back as early as 1579 by a priest on a ship under the command of Francis Drake. Other verification of occupancy exists from Spanish and Russian voyagers between 1595 and 1808.[6][7] Over 1000 prehistoric charmstones and numerous arrowheads have been unearthed at Tolay Lake in Southern Sonoma County - some dating back 4000 years. The lake was thought to be a sacred site and ceremonial gathering and healing place for the Miwok and others in the region.[8]

Coast Miwok would travel and camp on the coast and bays at peak fishing seasons.

After the Europeans arrived in California, the population declined from diseases introduced by the Europeans. Beginning in 1783, mission ecclesiastical records show that Coast Miwok individuals began to join Mission San Francisco de Asis, now known as Mission Dolores. They started joining that mission in large numbers in 1803, when the marriages of 49 couples from their Huimen and Guaulen local tribes (San Rafael and Bolinas Bay) appeared in the Mission San Francisco Book of Marriages.[9] Local tribes from farther and farther north along the shore of San Pablo Bay moved to Mission San Francisco through the year 1812. Then in 1814 the Spanish authorities began to split the northern groups—Alagualis, Chocoimes (alias Sonomas), Olompalis, and Petalumas—sending a portion of each group to Mission San Francisco and another portion to Mission San Jose in the southeast portion of the San Francisco Bay Area. By the end of the year 1817, 850 Coast Miwok had been converted.[10]

Mission San Rafael was founded by the Spanish Franciscans in Coast Miwok territory in the late fall of 1817. By that time the only Coast Miwok people still on their land were those on the Pacific Coast of the Marin Peninsula, from Point Reyes north to Bodega Bay.[11] The Spanish authorities brought most of the Coast Miwoks who had been at Missions San Francisco and San Jose back north to form a founding population for Mission San Rafael.[12] But some who had married Ohlone or Bay Miwok-speaking Mission Indians remained south of the Golden Gate. Over time in the 1820s Mission San Rafael became a mission for Coast Miwok and Pomo speakers. Mission San Francisco Solano, founded in 1823 in the Sonoma Valley (the easternmost traditional Coast Miwok region), came to be predominately a mission for Indians that spoke the Wappo or Patwin languages.[13]

At the end of the Mission period (1769–1834) the Coast Miwoks were freed from the control of the Franciscan missionaries. At the same time the Mission lands were secularized and ceded to Californios. Most Coast Miwok began to live in servitude on the ranchos for the new California land grant owners, such as those who went to work for General Mariano G. Vallejo at Rancho Petaluma Adobe. The ranch owners were dependent upon the labor pool of Indians with agricultural and ranching skills.[6][7] Other Miwok chose to live independently in bands like those at Rancho Olompali and Rancho Nicasio.

In 1837, a smallpox epidemic decimated all the native populations of the Sonoma region, and the Coast Miwok population continued to decline rapidly from other diseases brought in from the Spaniards as well as the Russians at Fort Ross.[7][14]

By the beginning of California statehood (1850), many Miwok of Marin and Sonoma Counties were making the best of a difficult situation by earning their livelihoods through farm labor or fishing within their traditional homelands. Others chose to work as seasonal or year-round laborers on the ranches that were rapidly passing from Mexican ownership into Anglo-American ownership.[7][15]

[edit] Olompali and Nicasio

After Mission San Rafael closed during the 1834-1836 period, the Mexican government deeded most of the land to Californios, but allowed the Indians ex-neophytes to own land at two locations within traditional Coast Miwok territory: Olompali and Nicasio.

The Coast Miwok leader Camilo Ynitia, secured a land grant of 2 sq. leagues known as Rancho Olompali, from Governor Micheltorena of Alta California in 1843, which included the prehistoric Miwok village of Olompali (his home village) and is north of present-day Novato.[16]

The village of Olompali dates back to 500, had been a main center in 1200, and might have been the largest native village in Marin County.[17] Ynitia held onto the Rancho Olompoli land title for 9 years, but in 1852 he sold most of the land to James Black of Marin.[17] He retained 1,480 acres (6.0 km2) called Apalacocha. His daughter eventually sold Apalacocha.

The other Indian-owned rancho was at Rancho Nicasio northwest of San Rafael. Near the time of secularization (1835), the Church granted the San Rafael Christian Indians 20 leagues (80,000 acres, 320 km²) of mission lands from present-day Nicasio to the Tomales Bay. About 500 Indians relocated to Rancho Nicasio. By 1850 they had but one league of land left. This radical reduction of land was a result of illegal confiscation of land by non-Indians under protest by Indian residents. In 1870, José Calistro, the last community leader at Nicasio, purchased the small surrounding parcel. Calistro died in 1875, and in 1876 the land was transferred by his will to his four children. In 1880 there were 36 Indian people at Nicasio. The population was persuaded to leave in the 1880s when Marin County curtailed funds to all Indians (except those at Marshall) who were not living at the Poor Farm, a place for "indigent" peoples.[18]

By the early 20th century, a few Miwok families pursued fishing for their livelihoods; one family continued commercial fishing into the 1970s, while another family maintained an oyster harvesting business. When this activity was neither in season nor profitable, Indian people of this area sought agricultural employment, which required an itinerant lifestyle. The preferred locality for such work was within Marin and Sonoma counties.
[edit] Recognition

The Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, formerly the Federated Coast Miwok, gained federal recognition of their tribal status in December 2000. The new tribe consists of people of both Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo descent.

[edit] Population

Estimates for the pre-contact populations of most native groups in California have varied substantially. (See Population of Native California.) Alfred L. Kroeber put the 1770 population of the Coast Miwok at 1,500.[19] Sherburne F. Cook raised this figure to 2,000.[10]

The population in 1848 was estimated as 300, and it had dropped to 60 in 1880.[20]

[edit] Notable Coast Miwoks

* José Calistro, was the last community leader at Nicasio.

* Chief Marin was a Coast Miwok of the Huimen local tribe, baptized as a child in 1803 at Mission San Francisco and noted as an alcalde at Mission San Rafael in the 1820s. He died on March 15, 1839.[18] Marin County and the Marin Islands are named in his honor.[21] He was the "great chief of the tribe Licatiut", according to General Vallejo's semi-historical report to the first California State Legislature (1850).

* Quintin, was renowned as the sub-chief of Marin and skipper at Mission Dolores, according to General Vallejo. San Quentin Peninsula (1840) is reputed to be named after him. San Quentin State Prison was added much later.[21]

* Ponponio (aka Pomponio) was a leader of a band of Native American fugitives in California who called themselves Los Insurgentes. Evading authorities, he was eventually captured in Marin County, and executed in Monterey in 1824.

* Greg Sarris is the current Tribal Chairman of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, also a college professor and author.

* William Smith was born a Bodega Bay Coast Miwok, was forced relocation to Lake County during the late 19th century, but returned to Bodega Bay where he and his relatives founded the commercial fishing industry in the area.

* Camilo Ynitia (1816–1856) was a Coast Miwok leader who became the owner of an 8,800 acres (36 km2) land grant secured for the Miwok, named Rancho Olompali, now the Olompali State Historic Park. Ynitia also forged a ranch labor-alliance with General Vallejo, and secured semblance of peace with the white settlers (about 1830s-1840s).[6][22]

[edit] External links

* Access Genealogy: Indian Tribal records, Miwok Indian Tribe
* Angel Island State Park Miwok Page
* Coast Miwok Language Tutorial
* Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria Web Site
* Kule Loklo (Bear Valley) Coast Miwok village
* Miwok Archeological Preserve of Marin
* Native Tribes, Groups, Language Families and Dialects of California in 1770 (map after Kroeber)
* U.S. National Park Service: Coast Miwok at Point Reyes
* Short radio episode Mouse Steals Fire from Coast Miwok lore in Californian Indian Nights Entertainments, 1930, California Legacy Project.

[edit] Notes

1. ^ a b Kroeber, 1907, Vol. 4 #6, sections titled "Shamanism", "Public Ceremonies", "Ceremonial Structures and Paraphernalia", and "Mythology and Beliefs".
2. ^ The Kuksu Cult paraphrased from Kroeber.
3. ^ Kroeber, 1925:445. "A less specialized type of cosmogony is therefore indicated for the southern Kuksu-dancing groups. [1. If, as seems probable, the southerly Kuksu tribes (the Miwok, Costanoans, Esselen, and northernmost Yokuts) had no real society in connection with their Kuksu ceremonies, the distinctness of their mythology appears less surprising.]".
4. ^ Clark 1910, Gifford 1917.
5. ^ "Miwok Indian Tribe". Access Genealogy. http://www.accessgenealogy.com/native/california/miwokindianhist.htm. Retrieved 2008-01-11.
6. ^ a b c Cook, 1976.
7. ^ a b c d Silliman, 2004.
8. ^ Tolay Lake Park: Natural and Cultural History, County of Sonoma Regional Parks Department: Tolay Lake Regional Park, August 20, 2007.
9. ^ Milliken 1995:176-179
10. ^ a b Cook, 1976:182.
11. ^ Goerke 2007:49, 70
12. ^ Goerke 2007:71-77; Milliken 2008:60
13. ^ Milliken 2008:59-60,64
14. ^ Cook 1976:213-214.
15. ^ Goerke 2007:155-168
16. ^ Goerke 2007; Shumway 1988:39.
17. ^ a b Reutinger 1997.
18. ^ a b Goerke 2007
19. ^ Kroeber, 1925:883.
20. ^ Cook, 1976:239, 351.
21. ^ a b Teather, 1986
22. ^ Teather has full name and acreage

[edit] References

* Access Genealogy: Indian Tribal records, Miwok Indian Tribe. Retrieved on 2006-08-01. Main source of "authenticated village" names and locations.
* Callaghan, Catherine. 1970. Bodega Miwok Dictionary. Berkeley, CA: University Of California Press.
* Cook, Sherburne. 1976. The Conflict Between the California Indian and White Civilization. Berkeley and Los Angeles, CA: University of California Press. ISBN 0-520-03143-1.
* Goerke, Betty. 2007. Chief Marin, Leader, Rebel, and Legend: A History of Marin County's Namesake and his People. Berkeley, CA: Heyday Books. ISBN 13:978-1-59714-053-9
* Kelly, Isabel. 1978. "Coast Miwok", in Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 8 (California). William C. Sturtevant, and Robert F. Heizer, eds. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1978. ISBN 0-16-004578-9 / 0160045754, pages 414-425.
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1907. The Religion of the Indians of California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 4:#6. Berkeley, sections titled "Shamanism", "Public Ceremonies", "Ceremonial Structures and Paraphernalia", and "Mythology and Beliefs"; available at Sacred Texts Online
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1925. Handbook of the Indians of California. Washington, D.C: Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin No. 78. (Chapter 30, The Miwok); available at Yosemite Online Library
* Merriam, C. Hart. 1916. "Indian Names in the Tamalpais Region. California Out-of-Doors No. 118, April, 1916.
* Milliken, Randall. 1995. A Time of Little Choice: The Disintegration of Tribal Culture in the San Francisco Bay Area 1769-1910. Menlo Park, CA: Ballena Press Publication. ISBN 0-87919-132-5 (alk. paper)
* Milliken, Randall. 2008. Native Americans at Mission San Jose. Banning, CA: Malki-Ballena Press Publication. ISBN 978-0-87919-147-4 (alk. paper)
* Reutinger, Joan. Olompali Park Filled With History, The Coastal Post, Sept. 1997.
* Silliman, Stephen. 2004. Lost Laborers in Colonial California, Native Americans and the Archaeology of Rancho Petaluma. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. ISBN 0-8165-2381-9.
* Shumway, Burgess M. 1988. California Ranchos: Patented Private Land Grants Listed by County. San Bernardino, CA: The Borgo Press. ISBN 0-89370-935-2
* Teather, Louise. Place Names of Marin. San Francisco, CA: Publisher Scottwall Associates, 1986. ISBN 0-9612790-9-5 paper



Paiute ceremony in 1872 at current site of Yosemite Lodge
FONTE IMMAGINE:http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Miwok-Paiute_ceremony_in_1872_at_current_site_of_Yosemite_Lodge.jpeg
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
Tila
Iniziato Sciamano
Iniziato Sciamano


Femminile Serpente
Numero di messaggi : 1826
Data d'iscrizione : 22.03.10
Età : 39
Località : Prov. CN

MessaggioOggetto: Re: Miwok - Coast Miwok   Gio 18 Nov 2010 - 20:38

Sono molto interessanti i loro miti e le leggende legati agli animali totem...due in particolare il coyote e il corvo...buona lettura!


FONTE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miwok_mythology

Miwok mythology
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The mythology of the Miwok Native Americans are myths of their world order, their creation stories and 'how things came to be' created. Miwok myths suggest their spiritual and philosophical world view. In several different creation stories collected from Miwokan people, Coyote was seen as their ancestor and creator god, sometimes with the help of other animals, forming the earth and making people out of humble materials like feathers or twigs.[1]

According to Miwok mythology, the people believed in animal and human spirits, and spoke of animal spirits as their ancestors. Coyote in many tales figures as their ancestor, creator god, and a trickster god. The Miwok mythology is similar to other Native American myths of Northern California.

Contents
[hide]

* 1 Creation of the World
o 1.1 First People
o 1.2 Coast Miwok (Coyote & Walik)
o 1.3 The Diver
o 1.4 Coyote & Silver Fox
* 2 Creation of Mankind
o 2.1 Coast Miwok (Coyote & Turkey Buzzard)
o 2.2 Coast Miwok (Coyote & Chicken Hawk)
o 2.3 Sierra Miwok (How Ravens Became People)
o 2.4 Sierra Miwok (Coyote & Lizard)
* 3 Death and After-Life Stories
o 3.1 Coast Miwok (Ocean Path West)
* 4 Context
* 5 Notes
* 6 References
* 7 See also

[edit] Creation of the World
[edit] First People

The Miwok believed there existed a "people who lived before real people" who in some tales have died out, in others are the same as the supernatural animal spirits.[2]

Several creation fragments exist detailing Coyote's place in the family of the "first spirits" on earth. According to the Coast Miwok, Coyote was the declared grandfather of the Falcon. There existed animal spirits and a few star-people spirits.[3] From the Sacramento river area the Miwok gave the following names of the first spirits:

* O-let'-te Coyote-man, the Creator
* Mol'-luk the Condor, father of Wek'-wek
* Wek'-wek the Falcon, son of Mol'-luk and grandson of O-let'-te
* Hul'-luk mi-yum'-ko the two beautiful women chiefs of the Star-people
* Os-so-so'-li Pleiades, one of the Star-women
* Ke'-lok the North Giant
* Hoo-soo'-pe the Mermaids or Water-maidens, sisters of Wek'-wek
* Choo'-hoo the Turkey Buzzard
* Kok'-kol the Raven
* Ah-wet'-che the Crow
* Koo-loo'-loo the Humming-bird[4]

[edit] Coast Miwok (Coyote & Walik)

According to one Coast Miwok version "Coyote shook his walik" (something similar to a blanket of tule) to the four directions south, east, north and west. The water dried, and land appeared. [5]

[edit] The Diver

In one creation myth called The Diver Coyote creates the earth and land from the Ocean or endless water. Coyote sends a duck to dive for some "earth". The duck dives to the bottom and comes up with some "earth". Coyote takes the earth and mixes it with "Chanit" seeds and water. The mixture swells and "the earth was there."[6]

[edit] Coyote & Silver Fox

Another creation story says that there is "no earth, only water". Silver Fox (a female) feels lonely and mentions this in a prayer song, and then meets the Coyote. Silver Fox makes an artistic proposal: "We will sing the world". They create the world together by dancing and singing. As they do so, the earth forms and takes shape.[7]

[edit] Creation of Mankind

[edit] Coast Miwok (Coyote & Turkey Buzzard)

In The Creation of Man myth, Coyote catches a turkey buzzard, raven and crow, plucks their feathers and place the feathers in different parts of the earth. They turn into the Miwok people and their villages. [8]

[edit] Coast Miwok (Coyote & Chicken Hawk)

Coyote comes from the west alone, followed by Chicken Hawk, who is his grandson. Coyote turned "his first people" into animals. He made the Pomo people from mud and the Miwok people out of sticks.[5]

[edit] Sierra Miwok (How Ravens Became People)

In the myth How Kah'-kah-loo The Ravens Became People, there was an epic flood, and the first world people climbed a mountain to avoid drowning. The water finally receded. They were starving, and they thought it was safe to come down and look for food. But they sank into the mud and died. The ravens came to sit on the holes where the people died, one raven at each hole. The ravens turned into new people the Miwok.[9]

[edit] Sierra Miwok (Coyote & Lizard)

From the Sierra Miwoks, another creation myth is more comparable to Pomo mythology: Coyote and Lizard create the world "and everything in it". Coyote create human beings from some twigs. They argue over whether human beings should have hands. Lizard wants humans to have hands but Coyote does not. Lizard wins a scuffle, and humans are created with hands.[10]

[edit] Death and After-Life Stories

[edit] Coast Miwok (Ocean Path West)

According to Coast Miwok, the dead jumped into the ocean at Point Reyes and followed something like a string leading west beyond the breaker waves, that took them to the setting sun. There they remained with Coyote in an afterworld "ute-yomigo" or "ute-yomi", meaning "dead home." [5]

[edit] Context

Many of the ideas, plots and characters in Miwok mythology are shared with neighboring people of Northern California. For example the Coyote-lizard story is like the tale told by their neighbors, the Pomo people. In addition, the Ohlone also believed that Coyote was the grandfather of the Falcon and maker of mankind. The relationship and similarity to Yokuts mythology is also evident.[11]

The myths of creation after an epic flood or ocean, the Earth Diver, and the Coyote as ancestor and trickser compare to Central and Northern California mythemes of Yokuts mythology, Ohlone mythology and Pomo mythology. The myths of "First People" dying out to be replaced with the Miwok people is a "deeply impressed conception" shared by Natives in Northwestern California.[12]

[edit] Notes

1. ^ Forester, 2006.
2. ^ Merriam, 1910, page 31, Stories of the First People--People Who Lived Before Real People Were Created.
3. ^ Merriam, 1910, page 83-84, The Creation of Man.
4. ^ This list of people comes from Merriam, 1910, page 83-84, The Creation of Man
5. ^ a b c Kelly, 1978, page 423.
6. ^ Kroeber, 1907, Indian Myths, page 203, The Diver.
7. ^ Bruchac, 2002.
8. ^ Merriam, 1910, page 83-84, The Creation of Man.
9. ^ Merriam, 1910, page 101, How Kah'-kah-loo The Ravens Became People.
10. ^ Merriam, 1910, page 58, The Coyote and the Lizard.
11. ^ Kroeber, 1925, page 446.
12. ^ Kroeber, 1907, The Religion of the Indians of California, section titled "Mythology and Beliefs".

[edit] References

* Barrett, Samuel A. "Myths of the Southern Sierra Miwok", University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology, March 23, 1927, Vol. 16, pages 1-28.
* Bruchac, Joseph, editor. "Silver Fox and Coyote Create Earth", Native American Animal Stories, edited by Joseph Bruchac (Fulcrum Pub.: Golden, CO, 1992), 3-4.
* Kelly, Isabel. 1978. "Coast Miwok", in Handbook of North American Indians, vol. 8 (California). William C. Sturtevant, and Robert F. Heizer, eds. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 1978. ISBN 0-16-004578-9 / 0160045754, (Religion and ritual, page 423. mythology informants: Tom Smith and Maria Copa Frias).
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1907. "Indian Myths of South Central California". University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 4:203. Berkeley. (Southern Sierra Miwok myths: Earth Diver, p. 203.); available at Sacred texts Online and 3Rocks Publications
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1907. The Religion of the Indians of California, University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnology 4:#6. Berkeley, sections titled "Shamanism", "Public Ceremonies", "Ceremonial Structures and Paraphernalia", and "Mythology and Beliefs"; available at Sacred Texts Online
* Kroeber, Alfred L. 1925. Handbook of the Indians of California. Washington, D.C: Bureau of American Ethnology Bulletin No. 78. (Chapter 30, The Miwok); available at Yosemite Online Library
* Gifford, Edward W., editor. Miwok Myths, Published by University of California Publications in American Archaeology and Ethnicity, May 11, 1917, Vol. 12, No. 3, pages 283-338. (Fourteen versions, including Theft of Fire and Bear and Fawns, collected in 1913-1914 from Central Sierra informants William Fuller and Thomas Williams.); available at Sacred Texts Online
* Merriam, C. Hart, editor.The Dawn of the World, Myths and Weird Tales Told by the Mewan (Miwok) Indians of California. Cleveland OH: Arthur H. Clarke Co, 1910. Reprinted as The Dawn of the World: Myths and Tales of the Miwok Indians of California, in 1993 with an introduction by Lowell J. Bean, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln; available at Sacred Texts Online



FONTE IMMAGINE: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Canis_latrans.jpg
Tornare in alto Andare in basso
 
Miwok - Coast Miwok
Vedere l'argomento precedente Vedere l'argomento seguente Tornare in alto 
Pagina 1 di 1

Permesso di questo forum:Non puoi rispondere agli argomenti in questo forum
Forum di sciamanesimo, antropologia e spirito critico :: SCIAMANESIMO :: I MONDI DELLO SCIAMANESIMO - WORLDS OF SHAMANISM :: NORTH & SOUTH AMERICA :: AMERICAN INDIAN SHAMANISM - Sciamanesimo Indiano Americano-
Andare verso: