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MessaggioOggetto: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:23

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bardic_poetry


Bardic poetry

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Bardic Poetry refers to the writings of poets trained in the Bardic Schools of Ireland and the Gaelic parts of Scotland, as they existed down to about the middle of the 17th century, or, in Scotland, the early 18th century. Most of the texts preserved are in Middle Irish or in early Modern Irish, however, even though the manuscripts were very plentiful very few were printed. It was considered a period of great literary stability due to the formalized literary language that changed very little. This allowed Bardic poets to travel over parts of Ireland and Gaelic Scotland with little difficulty.

Background

Irish file or bards (there was a technical distinction between the ranks, but the terms in later times were used interchangeably) formed a professional hereditary caste of highly trained, learned poets. The bards were steeped in the history and traditions of clan and country, as well as in the technical requirements of a verse technique that was syllabic and used assonance, half rhyme and alliteration. As officials of the court of king or chieftain, they performed a number of official roles.The bards' approach to the official duties of whatever the situation might have been was very traditional and drawn from precedent. However, even though many Bardic poets were traditional in their approach, there were also some who added personal feelings into their poems and also had the ability to adapt with changing situations although conservative.They were chroniclers and satirists whose job it was to praise their employers and damn those who crossed them.Much of their work would not strike the modern reader as being poetry at all, consisting as it does of extended genealogies and almost journalistic accounts of the deeds of their lords and ancestors: the Irish bard was not necessarily an inspired poet, but rather a professor of literature and a man of letters, highly trained in the use of a polished literary medium, belonging to a hereditary caste of high prestige in an aristocratic society (very conservative and based on prestige), holding an official position therein by virtue of his training, his learning, his knowledge of the history and traditions of his country and his clan (Bergin 1912).See also Chief Ollam of Ireland

Example

The following is an example of a Bardic poem from the translations of Osborn Bergin:<blockquote>Consolations

Filled with sharp dart-like pens
Limber tipped and firm, newly trimmed
Paper cushioned under my hand
Percolating upon the smooth slope
The leaf a fine and uniform script
A book of verse in ennobling Goidelic.

I learnt the roots of each tale, branch
Of valour and the fair knowledge,
That I may recite in learned lays
Of clear kindred stock and each person's
Family tree, exploits of wonder
Travel and musical branch
Soft voiced, sweet and slumberous
A lullaby to the heart.

Grant me the gladsome gyre, loud
Brilliant, passionate and polished
Rushing in swift frenzy, like a blue edged
Bright, sharp-pointed spear
In a sheath tightly corded;
The cause itself worthy to contain.

Anonymous</blockquote>An example of a Bardic Poet can also be seen in the book "The Year of the French" by Thomas Flanagan. In this book, a character by the name of Owen MacCarthy is bard known for his training with the native language as well as English. He is turned to in order to write specific, important letters by a group named the "Whiteboys". They are in need of someone skilled with writing letters, such as a bard like MacCarthy.Bardic texts


  • Tinnakill Duanaire
  • Royal Irish Academy MS 24 P 33
  • 23 N 10
  • The Book of the White Earl
  • Egerton 1782
  • Dunaire Mheig Shamhradháin (Book of Maguran)
  • Saltair na Rann
Selected poets


  • Mael Ísu Ó Brolcháin Muircheartach Ó Cobhthaigh Gilla Mo Dutu Úa Caiside Baothghalach Mór Mac Aodhagáin
  • Giolla Brighde Mac Con Midhe Gofraidh Fionn Ó Dálaigh Flann mac Lonáin Donnchadh Mór Ó Dálaigh


  • Lochlann Óg Ó Dálaigh Fear Flaith Ó Gnímh Mathghamhain Ó hIfearnáin Cormac Mac Con Midhe
  • Eoghan Carrach Ó Siadhail Fear Flaith Ó Gnímh Fear Feasa Ó'n Cháinte Tadhg Olltach Ó an Cháinte


  • Eochaidh Ó hÉoghusa Proinsias Ó Doibhlin Tarlach Rua Mac Dónaill Gilla Cómáin mac Gilla Samthainde
  • Tadhg Dall Ó hÚigínn Niníne Éces Colmán mac Lénéni Cináed Ua Hartacáin Muireadhach Albanach


  • Gofraidh Fionn Ó Dálaigh Cearbhall Óg Ó Dálaigh Máeleoin Bódur Ó Maolconaire Diarmaid Mac an Bhaird
  • Cú Choigcríche Ó Cléirigh Dallán Forgaill Óengus Céile Dé


  • Sedulius Scottus Saint Dungal Philip Ó Duibhgeannain (d.1340)
Selected poems


  • Amra Choluim Chille Le dís cuirthear clú Laighean Is acher in gaíth in-nocht...
  • Is trúag in ces i mbiam Sen dollotar Ulaid ... Sorrow is the worst thing in life ...


  • An Díbirt go Connachta A aonmhic Dé do céasadh thrínn Foraire Uladh ar Aodh
  • A theachtaire tig ón Róimh An sluagh sidhe so i nEamhuin? Cóir Connacht ar chath Laighean


  • Dia libh a laochruidh Gaoidhiol Pangur Bán Liamuin Buile Shuibhne
  • The Prophecy of Berchán Bean Torrach, fa Tuar Broide Timna Cathaír Máir Caithréim Cellaig
References


  • Osborn Bergin, 'Bardic Poetry: a lecture delivered in 1912', in Irish Bardic Poetry, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies (1970).
  • Michelle O'Riordan, Irish Bardic Poetry and Rhetorical Reality, Cork University Press [1] (2007)
  • The Oxford Companion to Irish Literature by Robert Welch, Bruce Stewart
External links


  • http://bill.celt.dias.ie/vol4/browseatsources.php?letter=A#ATS7714
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/plantation/bardic/index.shtml
  • http://www.ria.ie/publications/journals/journaldb/index.asp?select=abstract&id=100714
  • http://www.ria.ie/publications/journals/journaldb/index.asp?select=abstract&id=100750
  • http://www.ucc.ie/celt/bardic.html
  • http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/plantation/bardic/index.shtml
See also


  • Bard
  • Early Irish literature
  • Irish poetry
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:25

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tinnakill_Duanaire

Tinnakill Duanaire

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The Tinnakill Duanaire (Trinity College Dublin MS 1340) is an early seventeenth-century manuscript "prized for its important collection of bardic religious verse".[citation needed] It is believed to have been compiled for Aodh Buidhe Mac Domhnaill (1546–1619) of Tinnakill, Queen's County, Leinster, who is the subject of one of its poems, along with his brother, Alasdar (d. 1577).The poem concerning Aodh Buidhe — Le dís cuirthear clú Laighean — is thought to have been composed about 1570 by Muircheartach Ó Cobhthaigh.References


  • Anne Sullivan, The Tinnakill dunaire, in: Celtica; 11, (1976), pp. 214–28.
  • Eoghan Ó Raghallaigh, "A poem to Aodh Buidhe and Alasdar Mac Domhnaill of Tinnakill", in: Ossory, Laois and Leinster; 2 (2006)
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:25

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Royal_Irish_Academy_MS_24_P_33


Royal Irish Academy MS 24 P 33


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Royal Irish Academy MS 24 P 33 is an Irish dunaire or 'poem-book' compiled by the scribe Ruaidhrí Ó hÚigínn, sometime in the late seventeenth century. It was made for the Clandeboy O'Neills. Alongside the poems are two prose historical tracts, dating from apparently the late sixteenth century; An Leabhar Eoghanach, and Ceart Uí NéillReferences


  • Leabhar Cloinne Aodha Buidhe, ed. T. Ó Donnchadha, Dublin, 1931, pp. ix-xii.
  • Tyrone's Gaelic Literary Legacy, by Diarmaid Ó Diobhlin, in Tyrone: History and Society, 403-432, ed. Charles Dillon and Henry A. Jefferies, Geography Publications, Dublin, 2000. ISBN 0906602 718.


Ultima modifica di Admin il Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:26, modificato 1 volta
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:26

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/23_N_10





23 N 10

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MS 23 N 10, formerly Betham 145, is a late sixteenth-century Irish manuscript currently housed in the Library of the Royal Irish Academy, Dublin. It was formerly in the possession of Sir William Betham (1779–1853).The manuscript is highly valuable for its compilation of medieval Irish literature, copied in 1575 at Ballycumin, County Roscommon. The responsible scribes were Aodh, Dubhthach and Torna, three scholars of the Ó Maolconaire (anglicised: O'Mulconry), a learned family also known for compiling Egerton 1782 (British Library) in 1517.[1]
Contents

[hide]

  • 1 See also
  • 2 Notes
  • 3 Further reading
  • 4 External links
See also


  • Ó Maolconaire
  • Ollamh Síl Muireadaigh
  • Ó Duibhgeannáin
Notes


  1. ^ R.I. Best, MS. 23 N 10, pp. vi-viii; The Oxford companion to Irish literature. 445-6

Further reading


  • Best, R.I. (1954). MS. 23 N 10 (formerly Betham 145) in the library of the Royal Irish Academy. Irish Manuscripts Commission. Facsimiles in collotype of Irish manuscripts 6. Dublin: Stationary Office. Facsimile edition, with descriptive introduction
  • Mulchrone, Kathleen; O'Rahilly, T.F., et al., eds (1926-70). Catalogue of Irish Manuscripts in the Royal Irish Academy. Dublin. pp. 2769–80 (MS 967).
  • Brian Lalor, ed (2003). The Encyclopaedia of Ireland. Dublin: Gill & Macmillan. ISBN 0 7171 300 2.
  • Mac Dermot, Dermot (1996). Mac Dermot of Moylurg: The Story of a Connacht Family.
  • Moody, T.W., F.X. Martin and Francis John Byrne, ed (1982). A New History of Ireland VIII: A Chronology of Irish History to 1976 - A Companion to Irish History Part I. ISBN 0 19 821744.
External links


  • Bibliography of Irish Linguistics and Literature
  • Scéla
  • MS OMIT
  • CELT

    • The Dindshenchas of Emain Macha
    • "Abenteuer Königs Aed Oirdnide"
    • Verba Scáthaige
    </li>
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:27

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Book_of_the_White_Earl

The Book of the White Earl is an Irish religious and literary miscellany created c. 1404–1452.The Book of the White Earl, now Bodleian Laud Misc. MS 610, consists of twelve folios inserted into Leabhar na Rátha, aka The Book of Pottlerath. It was created by Gaelic scribes under the patronage of James Butler, 4th Earl of Ormonde (1392–1452). Henry and Marsh-Michel describe it as follows:<blockquote>"The sumptuous initials of this book are not more or less servile repetition of twelfth-century work ... the work of the scribe also is dazzling. He plays like a virtuoso with various sizes of script, the larger size having a majestic decorative quality. The contents are no less remarkable; the 'Martyrology of Óengus', the 'Acallam na Senórach' and a dindsenchus. ... The foliage pattern is probably inspired by foreign models, but is so completely integrated that the borrowing is only realised on second thoughts. The initials are large, bold, and drawn in firm lines and bright colours"</blockquote>Butler was known to have been strongly Gaelicised. He was an Irish-speaker and seems to have been the very first of the Anglo-Irish lords to appoint a brehon, Domhnall Mac Flannachadha, for his service. Butler granted Mac Flannchadha lands in Tipperary.Sources


  • Manuscripts and illuminations 1169-1603, by Francoise Henry and Genevieve Louise Marsh-Micheli, in A New History of Ireland, pp. 801–803, volume two.
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:28

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egerton_1782

Egerton 1782

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MS Egerton 1782 is the index title of an early sixteenth-century Irish vellum manuscript housed in the Egerton collection of the British Library, London. The compilation dates from c. 1517 and is the work of several scribes of the Ó Maolconaire (anglicised: O'Mulconry), a learned family of lawyers and historians, known also for compiling MS 23 N 10 later in the century.In spite of its relatively late date (compared to, for instance, the Book of Leinster, Lebor na hUidre or the Yellow Book of Lecan), it is one of the most important documents for the study of early Irish literature. Some texts, such as Aislinge Oenguso, are preserved nowhere else. Here follow some of the texts found in the manuscript:

  • Necrology for Art Buidhe mac Domhnaill Riabhaigh, f. 3-4.
  • Amra Choluim Chille (incomplete), f. 9b.
  • Baile Bricín. f. 17a
  • Forfess Fer Falgae, f. 19ra-b.
  • Verba Scáthaige, f. 19va-b.
  • Echtra Chondla, f. 19vb-20rb
  • Seilg Sléibhe na mBan "The Chase of Sliabh na mBan (Slievenaman)", f. 20 b 1.
  • Tesmolta Cormaic 7 Aided Finn, f. 24rb-25rb
  • Airem muintire Finn, f. 25rb-vb
  • Imthechta Tuaithe Luchra ocus Aided Fergusa / Echtra Fhergusa maic Léti, f. 30va-34va.
  • Aided Diarmata meic Fergusa Cherrbeóil, f. 37ra-40vb
  • Miscellaneous prose material, f. 40b2, 41a1.[1]
  • "Trí túatha fuilet i nhÉrinn" (prose), f. 44a.[1]
  • "Eol dam aided, erctha gním" (poem), f. 44a1.[2]
  • "Cormac and Ciarnat" (prose introduction and poem), f. 44 b.[3]
  • Suidigud Tige Midchuarta, f. 45v.
  • Fulacht na Morrígna, f. 46a.[4]
  • The Colloquy between Fintan and the Hawk of Achill, f. 47a.1-49b1.[5]
  • Cinaed húa hArtacáin, poem, f. 52a.
  • Cinaed húa hArtacáin, poem, f. 53b.
  • Eochaid Eolach ua Céirín, Apraid a éolchu Elga, f. 53va-54rb.[6]
  • Two Middle Irish poems, f. 56a.[7]
  • Egerton Annals: Mionannala, f. 56-64.
  • Cath Cairn Chonaill, f. 59v-61r
  • Longes mac n-Uislenn / Longes mac Uisnig, f. 67r-69v.
  • Tochmarc Ferbe (including episode 'Togail Duin Geirg'), f. 69v-70r.
  • Aislinge Oenguso, f. 70r-71v
  • Echtra Nera / Táin Bé Aingen, f. 71v-73v.
  • De Chophur in dá Muccida, f. 73v-76v.
  • Táin Bó Regamna, f. 76v-77v.
  • Compert Chonchobair (version 2), f. 77v-78v.
  • Compert Chon Culainn / Feis Tige Becfoltaig (two versions), f. 78v-80r.
  • Táin Bó Dartada, f. 80r-81r.
  • Táin Bó Regamain, f. 81r-82r.
  • Táin Bó Flidais, f. 82r-82v.
  • Táin Bó Fraích, f. 82v-87v.
  • Do Faillsigud Tána Bó Cúailnge, f. 87v.
  • Táin Bó Cúailnge (Recension II), f. 88r-105v, with a gap at f. 98.
  • Tochmarc Étaine (middle part, introducing Togail Bruidne Da Derga), f. 106ra-108vb
  • Togail Bruidne Dá Derga, f. 108vb-123vb.
  • Imram Curraig Maíle Dúin (fragments from the prose text), f. 124r-125v.
  • Eachtra an Mhadra Mhaeoil "The Adventures of the Crop-eared Dog."[8]
  • Seacht n-Urgarta Rígh Temruch "Seven prohibitions of the king of Tara"
Notes


  1. ^ a b http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G105019.
  2. ^ http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100051
  3. ^ Kuno Meyer (ed. and tr.). "Stories and songs from Irish MSS." Otia Merseiana II. 75-105.
  4. ^ See The Celtic Review 8 (1905): 74-6.
  5. ^ http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G109001. For "Kaland Enair for domnach", ascrbed to Fintan, f. 48 a, see Kuno Meyer (ed. and tr.). The Instructions of King Cormac mac Airt. 1909. 55.
  6. ^ http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G503000
  7. ^ Kuno Meyer (ed. and tr.), "Two Middle-Irish Poems." Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie (1896): 112-3.
  8. ^ Available from the Internet Archive.

Sources


  • Flower, Robin (ed.). Catalogue of Irish manuscripts in the British Library, formerly the British Museum. 2 vols: vol 2. London, 1926. 259-98.
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MessaggioOggetto: Re: Bardic Poetry   Lun 13 Dic 2010 - 7:28

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saltair_na_Rann


Saltair na Rann

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For the manuscript referred to as Saltair na Rann, see Rawlinson B 502The title Saltair na Rann “Psalter of Quatrains” refers to a series of 150 early Middle Irish religious cantos, written in the tenth century. Together they narrate the sacred history of the world, from its creation down to the last days of humanity. In the principal manuscript, Rawlinson B 502 (Bodleian, Oxford), it is followed by two poems of devotion and ten ‘Songs of the Resurrection’, which were added in the late tenth century.In the second devotional poem, Poem 152, the author identifies himself as Óengus Céile Dé: is me Oengus céle Dé (line 8009). Whitley Stokes took this to mean that the work as a whole was ascribed to the famous Óengus mac Óengobann, monk of Tallaght and author of the Félire Óengusso (Martyrology of Óengus), who since the 17th century also happens to have been nicknamed Céile Dé (Culdee). However, since the ascription occurs in appended material and therefore outside the core of Saltair na Rann, it is possible that it refers to the one or two devotional poems, which were either attributed to the earlier Óengus or composed by a late tenth-century namesake.[1]Notes


  1. ^ Follett, Céli Dé in Ireland. 162.

Primary sources


  • Stokes, Whitley (ed.). Saltair na Rann. A Collection of Early Middle Irish Poems. Oxford, 1883. Available in html markup from CELT and PDF available from Celtic Digital Initiative
  • Carey, John (tr.). King of Mysteries. Early Irish Religious Writings. 2nd ed. Dublin, 2000. 98-124 (with short introduction at p. 97). Translation of cantos 1-3.
Poem 151, beginning “Isam aithrech (febda fecht)” (c. 987):

  • Murphy, Gerard (ed. and tr.). "Prayer for forgiveness." Early Irish Lyrics. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1956. 36-9 (no. 16). Available from CELT
  • Stokes, Whitley (ed.). Saltair na Rann. 114-5.
  • Kinsella, Thomas (tr.), "The time is ripe and I repent." In The New Oxford Book of Irish Verse. Oxford, 1986. 54-55 (poem no. 54). Sixth stanza left untranslated.
Further reading


  • Howlett, Westley. Céli Dé in Ireland. Monastic Writing and Identity in the Early Middle Ages. London, 2006.
  • Mac Eoin, Gearóid (1982). "Observations on Saltair na Rann". Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 39: 1–28.
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